Boyd Dowler

Boyd Hamilton Dowler (born October 18, 1937) is a former professional football player, a wide receiver in the National Football League. He played twelve seasons from 1959 to 1971, eleven with the Green Bay Packers and one with the Washington Redskins.

Born in Rock Springs, Wyoming, Dowler grew up in Cheyenne, where his father Walter was a high school history teacher.[1] He was also a former football coach who had played college football at Wyoming.[2][3] Boyd was a three-sport athlete at Cheyenne High School.[4] He played college football at the University of Colorado as a single-wing quarterback under head coach Dal Ward.[5][6] Dowler led the Big Seven conference in receiving as a junior in 1957, but spent more time as a passer and runner during his senior season.[2] While at Colorado, he was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity.

The 25th overall pick in the 1959 NFL Draft, Dowler was the NFL rookie of the year in 1959, Vince Lombardi's first season as head coach. Dowler was a two-time Pro Bowler in 1965 and 1967, and a key contributor on the Packers dynasty in the 1960s, assisting the team to five NFL championship wins and victories in Super Bowls I and II. A late hit by Dallas Cowboys defensive back Mike Gaechter in the end zone following a third quarter touchdown catch resulted in a shoulder injury in the 1966 NFL Championship Game. Dowler aggravated the shoulder early in the first quarter of the first Super Bowl two weeks later, allowing seldom-used Max McGee to be a significant contributor in the game with two touchdown catches. Dowler made a big impact the following year in Super Bowl II with a 62-yard touchdown reception from quarterback Bart Starr in the first half. He finished the game as the top receiver for the Packers, with two receptions for 71 yards and a touchdown. Dowler is a member of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame and the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team.

After eleven seasons with the Packers ending in 1969, Dowler played one year for the Washington Redskins in 1971.

Dowler retired with a career record of 474 receptions for 7,270 yards and 40 touchdowns. He led the Packers in receptions for seven seasons.

Dowler is currently a scout for the Atlanta Falcons.

Boyd Dowler
No. 86
Position:Wide receiver, Punter
Personal information
Born:October 18, 1937 (age 81)
Rock Springs, Wyoming
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school:Cheyenne (WY)
College:Colorado
NFL Draft:1959 / Round: 3 / Pick: 25
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receiving yards:7270
Receptions:474
Receiving TDs:40
Punting yards:3987
Punts:93
Games played:162
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Coaching history

After retiring, he served as a longtime assistant coach.

References

  1. ^ Held, Tom (January 22, 1997). "Fervor struck early". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on January 27, 2014. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Packers sign Dowler, 3rd draft choice". Milwaukee Sentinel. June 11, 1959. p. 9, part 2.
  3. ^ Paige, Woody (February 3, 2012). "Ex-Buff Boyd Dowler enjoyed a Super career with Packers". Denver Post. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  4. ^ "Dowler shares honor with coach". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. December 29, 1959. p. 4, part 2.
  5. ^ Christopulous, Mike (December 29, 1962). "Packers' Dowling Wyoming 'rarity'". Milwaukee Sentinel. Wisconsin Salutes (special section). p. 2.
  6. ^ Huang, Jonathan (November 12, 2012). "Hall Of Fame Profile: Boyd Dowler". University of Colorado Athletics. press release. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-07. Retrieved 2014-06-10.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1959 Green Bay Packers season

The 1959 Green Bay Packers season was their 41st season overall and their 39th season in the National Football League and 41st overall. The club posted a 7–5 record in the 1959 season under first-year coach Vince Lombardi to earn a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

It was the Packers' first winning season in a dozen years, the last was a 6–5–1 mark in 1947. Green Bay had just one victory during the previous season in 1958 with the worst record in the 12-team league, and were 3–9 in 1957, tied for worst.

1961 Green Bay Packers season

The 1961 Green Bay Packers season was their 43rd season overall and their 41st season in the National Football League. The club posted an 11–3 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference and ending a fifteen-year playoff drought. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 37–0 in the NFL Championship Game, the first title game ever played in Green Bay. This was the Packers 7th NFL league championship.

The 1961 season was the first in which the Packers wore their trademark capital "G" logo on their helmets.

1961 NFL Championship Game

The 1961 National Football League Championship Game was the 29th title game. It was played at "New" City Stadium, later known as Lambeau Field, in Green Bay, Wisconsin on December 31, with an attendance of 39,029.The game was a match-up of the Eastern Conference champion New York Giants (10–3–1) and the Western Conference champion Green Bay Packers (11–3). The home team Packers were a 3⅓-point favorite.Packers Ray Nitschke, Boyd Dowler, and Paul Hornung, were on leave from the U.S. Army. Hornung scored 19 points (a touchdown, three field goals, and four extra points) for the Packers and was named the MVP of the game, and awarded a 1962 Chevrolet Corvette from Sport magazine.The victory was the first of five NFL titles won in a seven-season span by the Packers and their head coach, Vince Lombardi. It was the Packers' seventh league title and their first in 17 years.

1962 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1962. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Boyd (given name)

Boyd may refer to:

Boyd Adams

Boyd Alexander

Boyd Atkins

Boyd Banks

Boyd Bartlett

Boyd Henry Bode

Boyd Clack

Boyd A. Clark, American politician and jurist

Boyd Coddington

Boyd Converse

Boyd Cordner, Australian rugby league footballer

Boyd Devereaux

Boyd Douglas

Boyd Dowler

Boyd Dunlop Morehead

Boyd Estus

Boyd Gaines

Boyd Georgi

Boyd GordonBoyd Haley

Boyd Holbrook

Boyd Hoyland

Boyd Huppert

Boyd Irwin

Boyd Jones

Boyd Kane

Boyd Kestner

Boyd Kirkland

Boyd Kosiyabong

Boyd Langton

Boyd Matson

Boyd Melson, American boxer

Boyd Merriman, 1st Baron Merriman

Boyd Morgan

Boyd Mwila

Boyd Neel

Boyd Orr (politician)

Boyd K. Packer

Boyd Petersen

Boyd Jay Petersen

Boyd Raeburn

Boyd Rankin

Boyd Rice

Boyd Anderson Tackett

Boyd Tinsley

Boyd Travers

Boyd Vance

Boyd Wettlaufer

Boyd Winchester

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Dowler

Dowler may refer to:

Annabelle Dowler (born 1974), English actress

Arthur Dowler KCB KBE (1895–1963), General Officer Commanding the East Africa Command of the British Army

Beau Dowler (born 1987), former Australian rules footballer

Boyd Dowler (born 1937), former professional football player, a wide receiver in the National Football League

Brendan Dowler, OAM (born 1968), Australian wheelchair basketball player

Jean Dowler (1926–1992), female Baseball catcher and pitcher

Joseph Dowler (1879–1931), British tug of war competitor

Lawrence Dowler (born 1954), American former competition swimmer

Maxine Crouse Dowler, teacher, administrator, director

Mike Dowler, retired Welsh professional football goalkeeper

Milly Dowler, 13-year-old English girl who was abducted in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey in 2002 and subsequently murdered

Thomas Dowler (1903–1986), American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach of football and basketball

William Dowler Morris (1857–1931), mayor of Ottawa, Canada in 1901

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

Jesse Whittenton

Urshell James "Jesse" Whittenton (May 9, 1934 – May 21, 2012) was an American football player who played nine seasons in the NFL, mainly for the Green Bay Packers.

Whittenton also played on the Senior PGA Tour in the late 1980s. His best finish was T-21 at the 1989 Showdown Classic.

Johnnie Gray

Johnnie Lee Gray (born December 18, 1953) is an American retired professional football player. Gray was a safety in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers.

List of Green Bay Packers Pro Bowl selections

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are currently members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL), and are the third-oldest franchise in the NFL. The team has had representatives to the Pro Bowl every year since 1950 except for nine seasons. Below is a list of the Pro Bowl selections for each season.

Super Bowl II

The second AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional football, known retroactively as Super Bowl II, was played on January 14, 1968, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. The National Football League (NFL)'s defending champion Green Bay Packers defeated the American Football League (AFL) champion Oakland Raiders by the score of 33–14. This game and Super Bowl III are the only two Super Bowl games to be played in back-to-back years in the same stadium.

Coming into this game, like during the first Super Bowl, many sports writers and fans believed that any team in the NFL was vastly superior to any club in the AFL. The Packers, the defending champions, posted a 9–4–1 record during the 1967 NFL season before defeating the Dallas Cowboys, 21–17, in the 1967 NFL Championship Game (also popularly known as the Ice Bowl). The Raiders finished the 1967 AFL season at 13–1, and defeated the Houston Oilers, 40–7, in the 1967 AFL Championship Game.

As expected, Green Bay dominated Oakland throughout most of Super Bowl II. The Raiders could only score two touchdown passes from quarterback Daryle Lamonica. Meanwhile, Packers kicker Don Chandler made four field goals, including three in the first half, while defensive back Herb Adderley had a 60-yard interception return for a touchdown. Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr was named the MVP for the second straight time, becoming the first back-to-back Super Bowl MVP for his 13 of 24 passes for 202 yards and one touchdown.

The Over-the-Hill Gang (American football)

The Over-the-Hill Gang was the George Allen-coached Washington Redskins team of the early 1970s, so named due to the large number of veteran players on the team. Many of those players also played for Allen when he coached the Los Angeles Rams from 1966–1970.

The start of the Over-the-Hill Gang was the 1971 NFL Draft. Of the Redskins first five picks that year, they only used one, deciding to trade the rest. Allen had decided to build his team with experienced players who "did not have to mold to the NFL game". One of these trades was for Billy Kilmer, a quarterback who had been playing for the New Orleans Saints. As a starter for the Redskins, Kilmer threw for 3,869 yards and 32 touchdown passes. More importantly, he led the Redskins to back-to-back playoff appearances and became the first Redskins quarterback to start a Super Bowl.

This, however, was not the most important event in the '71 Draft that led to the creation of the gang. Allen later dealt seven draft choices (including the first- and third-round picks in 1971) as well as linebacker Marlin McKeever to his former team, the Rams. In exchange, the Redskins received linebackers Jack Pardee, Myron Pottios and Maxie Baughan, defensive tackle Diron Talbert, guard John Wilbur and special teams player Jeff Jordan. These players soon became a large part of the Over-the-Hill Gang defense. The Redskins also picked up Boyd Dowler, an eleven-year veteran with the Green Bay Packers, who won five championships as a Packer. He would later pick up strong safety Richie Petitbon (again from the Rams) and defensive tackle Ron McDole from the Buffalo Bills.

The average age of starters was 31 years old. Allen's strategy turned the Redskins around as the team improved to a 9-4-1 record in 1971, and finished the 1972 season with an NFC-best 11-3 record. The retooled Redskins' nine victories in 1971 was the most by a Washington team in 29 years. In his seven seasons with the club, Allen and his veterans produced seven winning records, five playoff appearances, and one trip to the Super Bowl.

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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