Box Office Mojo

Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic, algorithmic way. The site was founded in 1999, and was bought in 2008 by IMDb, which itself is owned by Amazon. The website is widely used within the film industry as a source of data.

From 2002–11, Box Office Mojo maintained popular forums on its website.

Box Office Mojo
Box Offce Mojo Logo
Box Office Mojo screenshot
Box Office Mojo homepage
Type of site
Film, box office revenue
Available inEnglish
OwnerIMDb (Amazon)
Created byBrandon Gray
Websiteboxofficemojo.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 3,179 (October 2018)[1]
CommercialYes
RegistrationNot compulsory
Launched1999
Current statusActive

History

Brandon Gray began the site in 1999. In 2002, Gray partnered with Sean Saulsbury and grew the site to nearly two million readers.[2] In July 2008, the company was purchased by Amazon.com through its subsidiary, the Internet Movie Database.[3][4]

From 2002–11, Box Office Mojo had forums, which were a popular place for box office "fanatics", and the site at one time was home to several popular movie games and quizzes, tests (e.g., Fantasy Box Office (created in 2006) and Create a Year of Movies), until these were summarily canceled for undisclosed reasons. Box Office Mojo had forums with more than 16,500 registered users. On November 2, 2011 the forums were officially closed along with any user accounts, and users were invited to join IMDb's message boards, even though not all the same features were available there.[5]

Tracking is still done very closely to the day by day, actual tabulation of distributors, making it possible to see the general trend of a film's "earnings trajectory".[6]

Box Office Mojo International

The international section covers the weekly box office of 50 countries and includes historical box office information from three more, as well as provides information for box office results for individual films from up to 107. The site also creates an overall weekend chart, combining all box office returns from around the world, excluding the United States and Canada. The overall weekend chart currently tracks the Top 40 films as well as approximately fifty additional films with no ranking.

Box Office Mojo International also reports the release schedule of upcoming films for Australia, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Norway, Russia and the CIS, South Korea, China, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and India. The site additionally has yearly and all time features for its various territories.

Redirection to IMDb, October 2014

On October 10, 2014, all traffic to Box Office Mojo was redirected to IMDb's box office page,[7][8] before returning the following day.[9]

Queries about the closure to IMDb and Amazon representatives were met with no response. Neither Brandon Gray, who founded the website but left several years ago after its sale to Amazon, nor Ray Subers, the operator at that time, would respond either.[10] On Ray Subers' Twitter[11] account, he revealed the website's return, but also stated he would not answer any questions pertaining to closure.[12] Subers subsequently left the website seven months later.[13]

References

  1. ^ "Boxofficemojo.com Traffic, Demographics and Competitors - Alexa". www.alexa.com. Retrieved 2 October 2018.
  2. ^ "About Box Office Mojo" Archived 2010-11-19 at the Wayback Machine. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  3. ^ Eric Engleman (December 17, 2008). "Amazon's IMDb movie trivia site acquires rival Box Office Mojo". TechFlash. American City Business Journals. Archived from the original on 2018-07-01. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  4. ^ Ben Fritz (December 15, 2008). "IMDB links up with Box Office Mojo". Variety. Archived from the original on December 19, 2008. Retrieved December 17, 2008.
  5. ^ "Forums" Archived 2011-03-02 at the Wayback Machine. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  6. ^ "Moviesboxoffice.in". Archived from the original on 2016-08-09. Retrieved 2016-07-03.
  7. ^ Jeff Sneider (October 10, 2014). "Box Office Mojo Redirecting to IMDb.com". The Wrap. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  8. ^ Natalie Jarvey (October 10, 2014). "Box Office Mojo Fate Uncertain; IMDb Remains Silent". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  9. ^ Dave McNary (October 11, 2014). "Box Office Mojo Returns After One-Day Absence". Variety. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  10. ^ Michael Cieply (October 10, 2014). "With a Click, the Data Site Box Office Mojo Disappears". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  11. ^ "Twitter". Archived from the original on 2015-01-07. Retrieved 2014-10-12.
  12. ^ Jeff Labrecque (October 13, 2014). "Box Office Mojo is back online, and its editor isn't taking questions". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  13. ^ "Twitter". Archived from the original on 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2015-09-15.

External links

1990s in film

The decade of the 1990s in film involved many significant developments in cinema. Continuing from the 1980s, low-budget independent films unceasingly rose and maintained their popularity in the industry within the decade.

2000s in film

The decade of the 2000s in film involved many significant developments in the film industries around the world, especially in the technology used. Building on developments in the 1990s, computers were used to create effects that would have previously been more expensive, from the subtle erasing of surrounding islands in Cast Away (leaving Tom Hanks' character stranded with no other land in sight) to the vast battle scenes such as those in Gladiator, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Matrix Reloaded, and 300.

In addition, film genres not known for their popular appeal in North America became increasingly attractive to filmgoers: films in foreign languages like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, The Passion of the Christ and Letters from Iwo Jima; and documentary films like An Inconvenient Truth, March of the Penguins, Super Size Me, and Fahrenheit 9/11, became very successful.

The 2000s saw the resurgence of several genres. Comic book superhero films became a mainstream blockbuster genre following the releases of Unbreakable, X-Men and Spider-Man. The film Gladiator similarly sparked the revival of epic films, while the Bollywood-inspired Moulin Rouge! sparked the revival of musical films in the Western world, where Bollywood musical films such as Lagaan and Devdas also began gaining mainstream exposure. The battle royale genre also began with the release of Japanese film Battle Royale.

Also gaining popularity was the use of computer-generated imagery (CGI) to produce films. These types of films were originally seen in the 1990s with the likes of Toy Story, and

Antz, but CGI films became more popular in 2001 with the release of Shrek. Other popular CGI films include The Ant Bully, A Christmas Carol, Bee Movie, Barnyard, Beowulf, Bolt, Cars, Chicken Little, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, Finding Nemo, Flushed Away, Happy Feet, Hoodwinked!, Horton Hears a Who!, Ice Age, Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie, Kung Fu Panda, The Incredibles, Madagascar, Meet the Robinsons, Monsters vs. Aliens, Monster House, Open Season, Over the Hedge, The Polar Express, Surf's Up, Shark Tale, Ratatouille, Robots, Up, and WALL-E. In addition, Up became the second animated feature ever to receive an Oscar nomination for The Best Picture.

2010s in film

The 2010s in film are discussed in the following articles:

2010 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2010

2011 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2011

2012 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2012

2013 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2013

2014 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2014

2015 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2015

2016 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2016

2017 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2017

2018 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2018

2019 in film: film releases and landmarks in 2019

Film in the 2010s: overviewing cinematographic landmarks for the entire decadeThe 2010s in film have seen a rise in reboots, remakes, sequels, and superhero films.

A24 (company)

A24 is an American independent entertainment company founded on August 20, 2012, by Daniel Katz, David Fenkel, and John Hodges and based in New York City. It specializes in film distribution, and film and television production.

Katz, Fenkel and Hodges prior to A24 worked in film and production, before leaving to eventually co-found the company, originally A24 Films, which specialized in film distribution. Starting off moderately in 2013 with A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III, the company's growth started with the release of Spring Breakers later that year. They became better-known after picking up the U.S. rights to Ex Machina and Room, and worldwide rights to The Witch, growing substantially since then. They entered into deals with DirecTV Cinema and Amazon Prime in late 2013, with some films distributed through them, and the name was shortened to A24 in 2016.

As of 2018, the company has received a total of twenty-five Academy Award nominations. In 2016, films distributed by A24 won Academy Awards for Best Actress (Brie Larson in Room), Best Documentary Feature (Amy), and Best Visual Effects (Ex Machina). In 2017, Moonlight won the Academy Award for Best Picture (the first such award for the company), Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor (Mahershala Ali). A24's television division released The Carmichael Show.

Interscope Communications

Interscope Communications (also known as Interscope Pictures) was a motion picture production company founded in 1982 by Ted Field. Its divisions included Interscope Records (which was founded in 1990 as a joint venture with Atlantic Records).

Legendary Entertainment

Legendary Entertainment (also known as Legendary Pictures or simply Legendary) is an American media company based in Burbank, California. The company was founded by Thomas Tull in 2000 and in 2005 concluded an agreement to co-produce and co-finance films with Warner Bros. and Universal Pictures. Since 2016, Legendary has been a subsidiary of the Chinese conglomerate Wanda Group.

List of 2013 box office number-one films in Japan

This is a list of films which placed number one at the weekend box office in Japan for the year 2013. It lists the films with the highest box office gross only.

List of 2016 box office number-one films in France

The following is a list of 2016 box office number-one films in France. Variety proclaimed that in 2016, France’s 2016 total box office was "the second-best in the last 50 years" and that after combining admissions for all films of any nationality, the total box office came in at 213 million, up 3.6% on 2015 and only bettered by 2011’s 217 million. The most popular films at the French box office were That Hollywood animation and action films and the latest new films in contemporary French comedy franchises.

List of 2016 box office number-one films in South Korea

The following is a list of 2016 box office number-one films in South Korea. When the number-one film in gross is not the same as the number-one film in admissions, both are listed.

List of Pixar films

This is a list of films from Pixar, an American CGI film production company based in Emeryville, California, United States. As of 2018, Pixar has released 20 feature films, which were all released under the Walt Disney Pictures banner. The company produced its first feature-length film, Toy Story, in 1995. Their second production, A Bug's Life, was released in 1998, followed by their first sequel, Toy Story 2, in 1999. Pixar had two releases in a single year twice: Inside Out and The Good Dinosaur in 2015 and Cars 3 and Coco in 2017.

Their upcoming slate of films include Toy Story 4 (2019), Onward (2020), an untitled film set to be released in 2020 , another untitled film set to be released in 2021, and two more untitled films set to be released in 2022.

List of biggest box-office bombs

In the film and media industry, if a film released in theatres fails to break even by a large amount, it is considered a box office bomb or box office flop, thus losing money for the distributor, studio, and/or production company that invested in it. Due to the secrecy surrounding costs and profit margins in the film industry, figures of losses are usually rough estimates at best, and there are often conflicting estimates over how much a film has lost. To accommodate this uncertainty the losses are presented as ranges where this is the case and the list is ordered alphabetically in the absence of a definitive order. Because the films on the list have been released over a large span of time currency inflation is also a factor that must be considered, so the losses are adjusted for inflation using the United States Consumer Price Index to enable a fair comparison.

Some films on this list grossed more than their production budgets yet are still regarded as flops. This can be due to Hollywood accounting practices that typically manipulate profits or keep costs secret to avoid profit-sharing agreements, but it is also possible for films to lose money legitimately even when the theatrical gross exceeds the budget. This is because a distributor does not collect the full gross, and the full cost of a film can substantially exceed its production budget once distribution and marketing is taken into account. For example, tax filings in 2010 for Cinemark Theatres show that only 54.5 percent of ticket revenues went to the distributor, with the exhibitor retaining the rest. While the distributor's cut will vary from film to film, a Hollywood studio will typically collect half the gross in the United States and less in other parts of the world. Marketing often represents a substantial share of the overall cost of the picture too: for a film with an average sized budget the promotion and advertising costs are typically half that of the production budget, and in the case of smaller films it is not unusual for the cost of the marketing to be higher than the production budget. In some cases, a company can make profits from a box office bomb when ancillary revenues are taken into account, such as home media sales and rentals, television broadcast rights, and licensing fees, so a film that loses money at the box office can still eventually break even.

List of film sequels by box-office improvement

This is a list of film sequels that outgrossed their predecessors. This list only includes North American grosses (United States and Canada), not worldwide totals. It is not adjusted for inflation.

List of highest-grossing animated films

Included on the list are charts of the top box-office earners, a chart of high-grossing animated films by calendar year, a timeline showing the transition of the highest-grossing animated film record, and a chart of the highest-grossing animated film franchises and series. All charts are ranked by international theatrical box office performance where possible, excluding income derived from home video, broadcasting rights and merchandise.

Animated family films have performed consistently well at the box office, with Disney films enjoying lucrative re-releases prior to the home video era. Disney also enjoyed later success with its Pixar brand, of which Incredibles 2, Toy Story 3, the Finding Nemo films, and Inside Out have been the best performers; beyond Pixar animation, the Shrek, Ice Age, Madagascar and Despicable Me series have met with the most success. The Peter Pan, Jungle Book, Mickey Mouse, and Bambi series saw successful returns after lying dormant for decades.

List of highest-grossing anime films

The following are lists of highest-grossing anime films. It includes the all-time highest-grossing anime films, the highest-grossing anime films by year and the highest-grossing anime film franchises. This article only covers box office revenue, and does not include ancillary revenue from other sources such as home entertainment or merchandise sales.

List of highest-grossing films

Films generate income from several revenue streams, including theatrical exhibition, home video, television broadcast rights and merchandising. However, theatrical box office earnings are the primary metric for trade publications in assessing the success of a film, mostly because of the availability of the data compared to sales figures for home video and broadcast rights, but also because of historical practice. Included on the list are charts of the top box office earners (ranked by both the nominal and real value of their revenue), a chart of high-grossing films by calendar year, a timeline showing the transition of the highest-grossing film record, and a chart of the highest-grossing film franchises and series. All charts are ranked by international theatrical box office performance where possible, excluding income derived from home video, broadcasting rights and merchandise.

Traditionally, war films, musicals and historical dramas have been the most popular genres, but franchise films have been among the best performers in the 21st century. Five Harry Potter films and five films from Peter Jackson's Middle-earth series are included in the nominal earnings chart, while the Star Wars, Jurassic Park and Pirates of the Caribbean franchises feature prominently. There is also strong interest in the superhero genre, with six films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe featuring among the nominal top-earners. Marvel Comics has also had success with its Spider-Man and X-Men properties, while films based on Batman and Superman from DC Comics have generally performed well. Although the nominal earnings chart is dominated by films adapted from pre-existing properties and sequels, it is headed by Avatar and Titanic (both directed by James Cameron), which are original works. Animated family films have performed consistently well, with Disney films enjoying lucrative re-releases prior to the home-video era. Disney also enjoyed later success with films such as Frozen (the highest-grossing animated film), Zootopia and The Lion King, as well as with its Pixar brand, of which Incredibles 2, Toy Story 3, and the Finding Nemo films have been the best performers. Beyond Disney and Pixar animation, the Despicable Me, Shrek and Ice Age series have met with the most success.

While inflation has eroded away the achievements of most films from the 1960s and 1970s, there are franchises originating from that period that are still active. Besides the Star Wars and Superman franchises, James Bond and Star Trek films are still being released periodically; all four are among the highest-grossing franchises. Some of the older films that held the record of highest-grossing film still have respectable grosses by today's standards, but no longer compete numerically against today's top-earners in an era of much higher individual ticket prices. When properly adjusted for inflation, however, on that comparative scale Gone with the Wind—which was the highest-grossing film outright for twenty-five years—is still the highest-grossing film of all time. All grosses on the list are expressed in U.S. dollars at their nominal value, except where stated otherwise.

List of highest-grossing films in the Philippines

Films in the Philippines derive income mainly from theatrical exhibitions as revenues from home video, television broadcast rights and merchandising share a small portion of the studio earnings. Even more, unlike in the United States and other territories, gross receipts of movies in the country were not officially disclosed in detail through the years. Third-party organizations that focus on box-office statistics were not present in the industry until the website Box Office Mojo started providing comprehensive weekly performance of releases in 2007. Although the website is a reliable source, it does not summarize the highest grosses of all time for the reason that its scope is limited to the Metro Manila Film Festival, an annual event during December to January.

List of highest-grossing horror films

The following page lists the highest-grossing horror films of all time, the highest-grossing horror film franchises at the box office and the biggest opening weekends for horror films. The figures have not been adjusted for inflation.

List of highest-grossing superhero films

The following page lists the highest-grossing superhero films of all time, the highest-grossing superheroes at the box office and the biggest opening weekends for superhero films. The figures have not been adjusted for inflation.

List of highest grossing live-action/animated films

The following is a list of the highest-grossing live-action/animated films, films that combine live action and animation characters. CGI characters are counted as animation if the film tries to make them look real. Otherwise a large part of modern films with non-human characters would be included.

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