Bourlon's genet

Bourlon's genet (Genetta bourloni) is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. It is known from only 29 zoological specimens in natural history museum and has been described as a new Genetta species in 2003.[3] It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as the global population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals.[1]

Bourlon's genet
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
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Subfamily:
Genus:
Species:
G. bourloni
Binomial name
Genetta bourloni[2]
Gaubert, 2003
Bourlon's Genet area
Bourlon's genet range

References

  1. ^ a b Gaubert, P.; Greengrass, E.J. & Do Linh San, E. (2015). "Genetta bourloni". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2015: e.T136223A45220931. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-4.RLTS.T136223A45220931.en. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta bourloni". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 555. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  3. ^ Gaubert, P. (2003). "Description of a new species of genet (Carnivora; Viverridae; genus Genetta) and taxonomic revision of forest forms related to the Large-spotted Genet complex". Mammalia. 67 (1): 85–108. doi:10.1515/mamm.2003.67.1.85.
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Extant Carnivora species

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