Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark

The Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian: konvertibilna marka, Cyrillic: конвертибилна марка); sign: KM; code: BAM) is the currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is divided into 100 pfenigs or fenings (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian: pfenig/fening; Cyrillic: пфениг/фенинг), and locally abbreviated KM.[1]

Bosnia and Herzegovina
convertible mark
Konvertibilna marka (Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian)
Конвертибилна марка (Bosnian and Serbian)
Convertible marks coins and banknotes
Convertible marks coins and banknotes1
ISO 4217
CodeBAM
Number977
Exponent2
Denominations
Subunit
 1/100Fening/Pfenig
"Fening" was introduced later and is used officially alongside "pfenig".
Pluralmarks (marke)
The language(s) of this currency belong(s) to the Slavic languages. There is more than one way to construct plural forms.
 Fening/Pfenigfenings/pfenigs (feninzi/pfenizi)
SymbolKM
 Fening/Pfenigpf
Nicknamemark (marka)
 Fening/Pfenignone
Banknotes10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 marks
 Freq. used10, 20, 50 and 100 marks
 Rarely used200 marks
Coins5, 10, 20 and 50 fenings/pfenigs;
1, 2 and 5 marks
 Freq. usedall of the above
 Rarely usednone
Demographics
Date of introduction22 June 1998
 Source[1]
User(s) Bosnia and Herzegovina
Issuance
Central bankCentral Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Websitewww.cbbh.ba
PrinterImprimerie Oberthur
(by François-Charles Oberthür)
MintRoyal Mint, Llantrisant
Valuation
Inflation−0.9%
 SourceThe World Factbook, 2014 est.
 MethodCPI
Pegged withEuro (€) = 1.95583 convertible marks
1 Designs for 10, 20, 50 and 100 KM banknotes differ for two entities of FBiH and RS in some aspects (images, order of scripts etc.). Residual banknote (200 KM) and all of the coins are same for both entities.

History

The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par.[1]

Etymology

The names derive from the German language. Three official languages in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian) have adopted German nouns die Mark and der Pfennig as loanwords marka and pfenig. The Official Gazette of BiH (Bosnian: Službeni glasnik BiH), Official newspaper of FBiH (Bosnian: Službene novine FBiH) and other official documents recognized pfenig or пфениг[2] (depending on the script; Bosnian and Serbian use both Latin and Cyrillic on an equal footing, while Croatian uses only Latin) as the name of the subdivision.

Banknotes of 50 fenings/pfenigs were in circulation from 1998 to 2000.[1] They were denoted as "50 KONVERTIBILNIH PFENIGA" / "50 КОНВЕРТИБИЛНИХ ПФЕНИГА"; however, the word convertible should never be next to the pfenig because only the mark can be convertible.[3] (See Mistakes for all of the mistakes on banknotes and coins.) Coins of 10, 20 and 50 pfenigs have been in circulation since 1998[1] (the 5-pfenigs coin was released in 2006).[1] All of them are inscribed "~ feninga" / "~ фенинга" on the obverse. Misspelling fening/фенинг has never been corrected, and it took that much hold that is now officially adopted and not recognized as an incorrect name.[1]

Plurals and cases

Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian have a complicated case system. In addition, it is important to note that they use three plural forms.

  • In combination with numbers 1, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, 71, 81, 101, 1001, … (i.e. ending in 1 but not 11) nouns use the nominative case singular (the base form):
màrka (màr: a – short vowel, rising tone) and pfénig/féning ((p)fé: e – short vowel, rising tone)
  • In combination with numbers that for rightmost digit have 2, 3 or 4 (except 12, 13 and 14) nouns use the genitive case singular (so called "the paucal form"):
màrke (màr: a – short vowel, rising tone) and pféniga/féninga ((p)fé: e – short vowel, rising tone)
  • In combination with numbers 0, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 100, 1000, 10000 etc. (i.e. ending in 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 11, 12, 13 or 14) nouns use the genitive case plural:
mȁrākā (mȁr: a – short vowel, falling tone; vowels ā are not accented but have genitive length) and pfénīgā/fénīngā ((p)fé: e – short vowel, rising tone; vowels ī and ā are not accented but have genitive length)
(For further information on accents in BSC, see Serbo-Croatian phonology and Shtokavian dialect#Accentuation.)

For the pfenig, the plural is pfeniga/feninga with a short unaccented a, whereas the genitive plural is pfeniga/feninga (same) but with a long unaccented i and a. A syllable after an accented syllable whose vowel is pronounced as a long and with a continuous tone (neither rising or falling) is said to have a genitive length (although, word need not to be necessarily in the genitive case in order to have genitive length on its syllable; it can be in locative, too).

These matters should be noted when one uses the local names in English. For example, English plural "ten pfenigas" / "ten feningas" is incorrect as the final a in BSC plural pfeniga/feninga already indicates the plural. So, "ten pfenigs" / "ten fenings" should be used instead. The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina (CBBH) uses "fenings" as the English plural.[1] Likewise, "twenty-one markas" / "two markes" / "twelve marakas" is incorrect; "twenty-one marks" / "two marks" / "twelve marks" should be used instead.

Coins

In December 1998, coins were introduced in denominations of 10, 20 and 50 fenings/pfenigs.[1] Coins of 1, 2 and 5 marks were introduced later.[1] The coins were designed by Bosnian designer Kenan Zekic[4] and minted at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant (Wales, UK).[1]

Banknotes

In 1998, notes were introduced in denominations of 50 fenings/pfenigs, 1 mark, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 marks. 200-mark notes were added in 2002, whilst the 50-fening/pfenig, 1- and 5-mark notes were later withdrawn from circulation. All current notes are valid throughout the country.[1]

The banknotes are issued by the Central Bank of Bosnia Herzegovina, with distinct designs for the entities of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska,1 except for the largest denomination – 200-mark note.[1] On the notes of the Republika Srpska, inscriptions are printed in Cyrillic, then Latin script, and vice versa. Banknotes, with the exception of the 200-mark note, are printed by the French company Oberthur.[1][5]

Nationwide issues

The portraits of Ivan Franjo Jukić and Meša Selimović, which are both writers, were featured by consensus between both entities on all 1 and 5 KM notes used between 1998 and 2010.[1]

On 15 May 2002, a 200 KM banknote, designed by Robert Kalina, was introduced during a promotion that was held in the Central Bank of BH. The reverse design which depicts a bridge is meant to resemble the euro banknotes, which were also designed by Robert Kalina. After an international tender, the Austrian company Oesterreichische Banknoten und Sicherheitsdruck GmbH (OeBS) in Vienna was chosen to print the notes. Initially, six million were ordered.[11]

Exchange rates

Initially the mark was pegged to the German mark at par.[1] Since the replacement of the German mark by the euro in 2002, the Bosnian convertible mark uses the same fixed exchange rate to euro that the German mark has (that is, 1 EUR = 1.95583 BAM).[1]

Current BAM exchange rates
From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From XE: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From OANDA: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From fxtop.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD

Mistakes

1 KM banknote mistake (RS)
Detail on 1 KM banknote for Republika Srpska with misspelled name of Ivo Andrić written in Cyrillic as "ИВО АНДРИЂ / IVO ANDRIĐ" instead of "ИВО АНДРИЋ / IVO ANDRIĆ"

Banknotes and coins of Bosnia and Herzegovina have many mistakes and inconsistencies (maybe more than any other currency).[1]

Officially, only one banknote has not been released in circulation because of a mistake, even though other banknotes with mistakes had been issued.[1]

Examples

These are the most important mistakes that have been noticed till now:

  1. 50 fenings/pfenigs banknote in both designs had the adjective "convertible" next to the noun "pfenig" although only mark can be convertible ("50 KONVERTIBILNIH PFENIGA" / "50 КОНВЕРТИБИЛНИХ ПФЕНИГА").[3]
  2. 1 KM banknote for Republika Srpska was printed as "ИВО АНДРИЂ / IVO ANDRIĐ" instead of "ИВО АНДРИЋ / IVO ANDRIĆ". This banknote was immediately removed from circulation.[a]
  3. 5 KM banknote in both designs had the Cyrillic word "five" incorrectly printed in Latin script on its reverse side ("PET КОНВЕРТИБИЛНИХ МАРАКА", instead of "ПЕТ ...").
  4. 10 KM banknote for Republika Srpska (first series, 1998) had Aleksa Šantić's name printed in Latin script although it should have been printed in Cyrillic script as it is on all other examples in 1998 series.
  5. 100 KM banknote in both designs was incorrectly printed with the Cyrillic abbreviation (acronym) of Central bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina with "Џ / Dž" instead of "Ц / C" (i.e. "ЏББХ / DžBBH" instead of "ЦББХ / CBBH") in safety bar.
  6. The name of the subdivision of convertible mark found on coins has been incorrectly written, the word "pfenig" being written as "fening". This mistake took so much hold (especially because there were no (and are no) 50 pfenigs/fenings banknotes in circulation) that "fening" is now officially adopted and not recognized as incorrect for the KM's hundredth part.[1]
  7. In 2017, Edin Bujak from Department of archaeology on Faculty of Philosophy in Sarajevo, noticed a mistake on 10 KM banknote for the Federation of B&H. Picture of stećak on reverse side is actually a picture of stećak from Križevići, Olovo, and not from Radimlja necropolis as stated on banknote. Central bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina confirmed this mistake and it will be corrected in future printing of bankotes.[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x "BH Currency – KM Banknotes and Coins". cbbh.ba. Sarajevo: Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina. p. 1. Retrieved 20 December 2015. Fening details: | Mint: Royal Mint, Llantrisant | Released into Circulation: December 9th, 1998, with the exception of the 5 fening coin which is in circulation from January 5, 2006. | Face: Map of BH with overlay of denomination | Reverse: Flag of BH | The Words: "Bosna i Hercegovina" and "Fening" are on the face and reverse edges in both Latin and Cyrillic script. The date of production is on the reverse side on the left from the BH flag. | 10, 20 and 50 fening coins are made of copper-plated steel, while 5 fening coin is made of nickel-plated steel.
  2. ^ Mulaomerović, Jasminko (2004). "Novi numizmatičar" [New numismatist] (in Bosnian). 2 (5) (3 (8) ed.). Sarajevo: Numizmatičko društvo – Sarajevo: 20–21. Retrieved 20 December 2015 – via Scribd. Mi, u našoj veseloj zemlji, imamo konvertibilnu marku kao novčanu jedinicu. Marka ima svoj najsitniji dio koji se zove pfenig. Tako kaže Službeni glasnik BiH, a Službeni glasnik – to ti je zakon. Ko misli da to i nije baš zakon, jer se tu objavljuju stvari koje se tiču vesele zemlje Bosne i Hercegovine, tu su i Službene novine Federacije BiH koje to potvrđuju, i to na sva tri jezika i u dva pisma. (...) Međutim, imamo mi i kovanice. Iako su i one dijelovi marke, samo odmetala, one se kod nas drugačije zovu – fening. Tako na kovanicama možemo pročitati 10 feninga, 20 feninga i 50 feninga.
  3. ^ a b Mulaomerović, Jasminko (2004). "Novi numizmatičar" [New numismatist] (in Bosnian). 2 (5) (3 (8) ed.). Sarajevo: Numizmatičko društvo – Sarajevo: 20–21. Retrieved 20 December 2015 – via Scribd. ... i u dva pisma. Da je to tako vidi se na novčanicama od 50 KONVERTIBILNIH PFENIGA, i onim sa Skenderom Kulenovićem i onim sa Brankom Ćopićem. Doduše, „Službeni(e)...” i stvarne novčanice se malo razilaze u detaljima pa tako u Službeni(e)... imamo „konvertibilnu marku, apoen od 50 pfeniga”, a na novčanicama „50 KONVERTIBILNIH PFENIGA”. Dakle, prema Službeni(e)... marka jeste konvertibilna, ali pfenig nije, dok je prema novčanici i PFENIG konvertibilan. Ima tu još malo nejasnoća oko velikog i malog slova u riječi „pfenig”, ali kao da je to, uostalom, i važno, i ko će sve to, bogati, gledati!?
  4. ^ Website of Kenan Zekic. Available at: http://kenanzekic.com.ba/
  5. ^ Mulic, Josef (2000). Papirini novac na tlu Bosne i Hercegovine od 1918. godine do danas
  6. ^ a b "CBBH". Cbbh.ba. Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  7. ^ a b c d "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-12-22. Retrieved 2014-02-09.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 2014-02-09.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ a b "CBBH". Cbbh.ba. Archived from the original on 2016-03-14. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  10. ^ The decision not to release into the circulation the banknote in denominations of 1 convertible mark (Official Gazette of BiH (No 13/98))
  11. ^ a b "CBBH". Cbbh.ba. Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  12. ^ "Na novčanici od 10 KM nije stećak iz Radimlje, greška će biti ispravljena". Radiosarajevo.ba. Retrieved 4 January 2018.

External links

Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina

The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian: Centralna banka Bosne i Hercegovine / Централна банка Босне и Херцеговине) is the central bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina, located in the capital city, Sarajevo.

The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina was established in accordance with the Law adopted at the Parliamentary Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina on June 20, 1997. It started its operation on August 11, 1997.

The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina maintains monetary stability by issuing domestic currency according to the currency board arrangement with full coverage in freely convertible foreign exchange funds under the fixed exchange rate (1 BAM: 0.51129 EUR). The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina defines and controls the implementation of monetary policy of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina supports and maintains appropriate payment and settlement systems. It also co-ordinates the activities of the BH Entity Banking Agencies which are in charge of bank licensing and supervision.

The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina has the head office, three main units and two branches. The head office of the Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina is in Sarajevo. The main units are the Main Unit Sarajevo, the Main Bank of Republika Srpska CBBH Banja Luka and Main Unit Mostar. The branches are: the CBBH Branch in Brčko and the Main Bank of Republika Srpska CBBH Branch in Pale.

The senior body of the Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina is the governing board, which is in charge of establishing and supervision of monetary policy, organization and strategies of the Central Bank, all according to the powers given to the board by the law. According to the law on CBBH, the governing board consists of five persons that are appointed by the BH presidency for a six-year mandate. The governing board appoints one of its members as governor.

The governor of the Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina is Senad Softić.

The management of the Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of governor and three vice governors, appointed by the governor with the approval of the governing board. The task of the management is the operative management of the Central Bank business. Each vice governor is directly responsible for the operations of one sector of the Central Bank.

Central banks and currencies of Europe

This is a list of central banks and currencies of Europe .

Currency board

A currency board is a monetary authority which is required to maintain a fixed exchange rate with a foreign currency. This policy objective requires the conventional objectives of a central bank to be subordinated to the exchange rate target.

Currency symbol

A currency symbol is a graphic symbol used as a shorthand for a currency's name, especially in reference to amounts of money.

Although several former currency symbols were rendered obsolete by the adoption of the euro, having a new and unique currency symbol – implementation of which requires the adoption of new Unicode and type formats – has now become a status symbol for international currencies. The European Commission considers the global recognition of the euro sign € part of its success. In 2009, India launched a public competition to replace the ₨ ligature it shared with neighbouring countries. It finalised its new currency symbol, ₹ (₹) on 15 July 2010. It is a blend of the Latin letter 'R' with the Devanagari letter 'र' (ra).

Dinar

The dinar is the principal currency unit in several countries and was used historically in several more.

The modern dinar's historical antecedents are the gold dinar, the main coin of the medieval Islamic empires, first issued in AH 77 (696–697 AD) by Caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan. The word is derived from the silver denarius coin of ancient Rome, first minted about 211 BC.

The English word "dinar" is the transliteration of the Arabic دينار (dīnār), which was borrowed via the Syriac dīnarā from the Greek δηνάριον (dēnárion), itself from the Latin dēnārius.A gold coin known as the dīnāra was also introduced to India by the Kushan Empire in the 1st century AD, and adopted by the Gupta Empire and its successors up to the 6th century. The modern gold dinar is a projected bullion gold coin, so far not issued as official currency by any state.

EURion constellation

The EURion constellation (also known as Omron rings or doughnuts) is a pattern of symbols incorporated into a number of banknote designs worldwide since about 1996. It is added to help imaging software detect the presence of a banknote in a digital image. Such software can then block the user from reproducing banknotes to prevent counterfeiting using colour photocopiers. According to research from 2004, the EURion constellation is used for colour photocopiers but probably not used in computer software. It has been reported that Adobe Photoshop will not allow editing of an image of a banknote, but this is believed to be due to a different, unknown digital watermark rather than the EURion constellation.

Economy of Bosnia and Herzegovina

This page discusses the economy of Bosnia and Herzegovina since Bosnia and Herzegovina's declaration of sovereignty in October 1991 and the declaration of independence from the former Yugoslavia on 3 March 1992.

Hard currency

Hard currency, safe-haven currency or strong currency is any globally traded currency that serves as a reliable and stable store of value. Factors contributing to a currency's hard status might include the long-term stability of its purchasing power, the associated country's political and fiscal condition and outlook, and the policy posture of the issuing central bank.

Safe haven currency is defined as a currency which behaves like a hedge for a reference portfolio of risky assets conditional on movements in global risk aversion.Conversely, a soft currency indicates a currency which is expected to fluctuate erratically or depreciate against other currencies. Such softness is typically the result of political or fiscal instability within the associated country.

List of circulating currencies

This list contains the 180 currencies recognized as legal tender in United Nations (UN) member states, UN observer states, partially recognized or unrecognized states, and their dependencies. However excluding the pegged (fixed exchange rate) currencies, there are only 130 currencies (which are independent or pegged to a currency basket). Dependencies and unrecognized states are listed here only if another currency is used in their territory that is different from the one of the state that administers them or has jurisdiction over them.

List of circulating fixed exchange rate currencies

This is a list of circulating or proposed fixed exchange rate currencies, with corresponding reference currencies and exchange rates.

The yellow background means a given currency is only a proposed currency.

List of currencies

A list of all currencies, current and historic. The local name of the currency is used in this list, with the adjectival form of the country or region.

Mark (currency)

The mark was a currency or unit of account in many nations. It is named for the mark unit of weight. The word mark comes from a merging of three Teutonic/Germanic words, Latinised in 9th-century post-classical Latin as marca, marcha, marha or marcus. It was a measure of weight mainly for gold and silver, commonly used throughout Western Europe and often equivalent to eight ounces. Considerable variations, however, occurred throughout the Middle Ages.As of 2018, the only circulating currency named "mark" is the Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark.

Postage stamps and postal history of Bosnia and Herzegovina

This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Robert Kalina

Robert Kalina (born 29 June 1955) is an Austrian designer. For the National Bank of Austria he created the T 382 design, which was the winning design of the 1996 competition for the art shown on the euro banknotes. Kalina's design was chosen by the EMI Council (European Monetary Institute) on 3 December 1996. Kalina also designed the banknotes for the Azerbaijani manat, the 2010 series of the Syrian Pound and the highest-denomination

banknote for Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark in 2002.

Skender Kulenović

Skender Kulenović (2 September 1910 – 25 January 1978) was a Bosnian poet, novelist and dramatist.

Coins of the convertible mark (1998–present)[1]
Image
O R
Value Technical parameters Description Date of
Diameter Mass Composition Edge Obverse Reverse minting issue withdrawal lapse
O R 5 fenings/pfenigs 18.00 mm 2.66 g nickel-plated steel reeded Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina, country name, denomination Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina, country name, year 2005–present 5 January 2006 Current
O R 10 fenings/pfenigs 20.00 mm 3.90 g copper-plated steel plain Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina, country name, denomination Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina, country name, year 1998–present 9 December 1998 Current
O R 20 fenings/pfenigs 22.00 mm 4.50 g reeded 1998–present
O R 50 fenings/pfenigs 24.00 mm 5.15 g 1998–present
O R 1 mark   23.25 mm 4.95 g nickel-plated steel milled and smooth Denomination, country name, indented and inverted triangles* Coat of arms of Bosnia and Herzegovina 2000–present 31 July 2000 Current
O R 2 marks 25.75 mm 6.90 g cupro-nickel (inner ring);
golden 5.5%;
nickel-brass combination (outer ring)
Peace dove 2000–present
O R 5 marks 30.00 mm 10.35 g nickel-brass (inner ring);
copper-nickel (outer ring)
milled 2005–present 5 January 2006
These images are to scale at 2.5 pixels per millimetre. For table standards, see the coin specification table.
  • The triangles are intended for the visually impaired.
Banknotes of the convertible mark for FBiH (1998–present)[1]
Image
O R
Value Technical parameters Description Date of
Dimensions Watermark Obverse Reverse printing issue withdrawal lapse
O R 50 fenings/pfenigs 120 mm × 60 mm Central Bank monogram repeated vertically Skender Kulenović Stećak Zgošca fragment No date
(1998)
22 June 1998 1 January 2003[6] 1 April 2018[7]
O R 1 mark   120 mm × 60 mm Ivan Franjo Jukić Stećak Stolac fragment 1 January 2009[8]
O R 5 marks 122 mm x 62 mm Meša Selimović Trees No date
(1998)
1 January 2010[9] 1 April 2018[7]
O R 10 marks 130 mm x 65 mm Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar Stećak Radimlja fragment No date
(1998)
(2008)
(2012)

22 June 1998
4 November 2008
1 June 2012
Current
O R 20 marks 138 mm x 68 mm Antun Branko Šimić Stećak Radimlja fragment
O R 50 marks 146 mm x 71 mm Musa Ćazim Ćatić Stone relief No date
(1998)
(2002)
(2007)
(2008)
(2009)
(2012)

22 June 1998
No date (2002)
1 March 2007
No date (2008)
14 December 2009
1 June 2012
O R 100 marks 154 mm x 74 mm Nikola Šop Stećak Zgošca fragment No date
(1998)
(2002)
(2007)
(2008)
(2012)

27 July 1998
No date (2002)
1 March 2007
No date (2008)
1 June 2012
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixel per millimetre. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.
Banknotes of the convertible mark for RS (1998–present)[1]
Image
O R
Value Technical parameters Description Date of
Dimensions Watermark Obverse Reverse printing issue withdrawal lapse
O R 50 fenings/pfenigs 120 mm × 60 mm Central Bank monogram repeated vertically Branko Ćopić House and books No date
(1998)
22 June 1998 1 January 2003[6] 1 April 2018[7]
O R 1 mark   120 mm × 60 mm Ivo Andrić The Bridge on the Drina 15 July 1998[a][10]
O R [b]5 marks 122 mm x 62 mm Meša Selimović Trees No date
(1998)
1 January 2010[9] 1 April 2018[7]
O R 10 marks 130 mm x 65 mm Aleksa Šantić Loaf of bread No date
(1998)
(2008)
(2012)

22 June 1998
4 November 2008
1 June 2012
Current
O R 20 marks 138 mm x 68 mm Filip Višnjić Gusle (musical instrument)
O R 50 marks 146 mm x 71 mm Jovan Dučić pen, eyeglasses and book No date
(1998)
(2002)
(2007)
(2008)
(2009)
(2012)

22 June 1998
No date (2002)
1 March 2007
No date (2008)
14 December 2009
1 June 2012
O R 100 marks 154 mm x 74 mm Petar Kočić pen, eyeglasses and book No date
(1998)
(2002)
(2007)
(2008)
(2012)

27 July 1998
No date (2002)
1 March 2007
No date (2008)
1 June 2012
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixel per millimetre. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.
Banknotes of the convertible mark for both entities (2002–present)[1]
Image
O R
Value Technical parameters Description Date of
Dimensions Watermark Obverse Reverse printing issue withdrawal lapse
O R 200 marks 156 mm x 76 mm Image of the Bridge on River Drina[11]> Ivo Andrić The Bridge on the Drina No date
(2002)

15 May 2002
Current
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixel per millimetre. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.
Currencies of the Former Yugoslavia
territory 1918 1920 1941 1944 1992 1994 1995 1998 1999 2002 2003 2007 territory
 North Macedonia Serbian dinar
(Kingdom of Serbia)
Yugoslav dinar
(Kingdom of Yugoslavia)
Bulgarian lev Yugoslav dinar
(SFR Yugoslavia 1944-1992,
FR Yugoslavia 1992-1999,
Serbia 1999-2003,
Republika Srpska 1994-1998)
Macedonian denar North Macedonia
 Serbia   Serbian dinar (Occupied Serbia)     Serbian dinar Serbia
 Kosovo Albanian lek
(Kosovo and Western Macedonia)
German mark Euro   Kosovo
 Montenegro Montenegrin perper
(Kingdom of Montenegro)
Italian lira
(Occupied Montenegro)
Montenegro
 Slovenia Yugoslav krone
(State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs)
German Reichsmark Slovenian tolar Slovenia
 Croatia   Independent State of Croatia kuna Croatian dinar   Croatian kuna Croatia
 Serbian Krajina Krajina dinar
 Bosnia and Herzegovina  Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar
(Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina)
Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Republika Srpska Republika Srpska dinar Yugoslav dinar
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As a denomination

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