Borough of Darlington

Darlington is a unitary authority area in the ceremonial county of County Durham, north-east England. It borders the non-metropolitan county of County Durham to the north and west, Stockton-on-Tees to the east and North Yorkshire to the south along the line of the River Tees. The urban centre and the base of the borough is the town of Darlington. In 2011 it had a resident population of 106,000. The borough is a member of the Tees Valley combined authority area.

Borough of Darlington
Unitary, Borough
Darlington Town Hall
Darlington Town Hall
Official logo of Borough of Darlington

Coat of Arms
Darlington shown within County Durham and England
Darlington shown within County Durham and England
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionNorth East England
City regionTees Valley
Ceremonial countyCounty Durham
Admin. HQDarlington
Government
 • TypeDarlington Borough Council
 • Leadership:Leader & Cabinet
 • Executive:Labour
 • MPs:Phil Wilson (L)
Jenny Chapman (L)
Area
 • Total76.3 sq mi (197.5 km2)
Area rank160th
Population
 (mid-2018 est.)
 • Total106,566
 • RankRanked 223rd
 • Density1,400/sq mi (540/km2)
Time zoneUTC+0 (Greenwich Mean Time)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (British Summer Time)
ONS code00EH (ONS)
E06000005 (GSS)
Ethnicity93.7% White, 2.8% S.Asian, 3.5% other Non-White
Websitedarlington.gov.uk

Council

The current borough boundaries were formed on 1 April 1974, by the creation of a new non-metropolitan district of Darlington by the Local Government Act 1972, covering the previous county borough of Darlington along with nearly all of Darlington Rural District (the Newton Aycliffe parts of which went to Sedgefield). It remained part of County Durham for administrative purposes until reconstituted as a unitary authority on 1 April 1997. For ceremonial purposes it remains part of County Durham, with whom it continues to share certain local services, such as Fire and Rescue and Police. It is included within the Tees Valley area for both cultural and regional government administration.

It is made up of 24 council wards, twenty within the town of Darlington itself, which are also covered by the Darlington parliamentary constituency and four rural wards of Heighington & Coniscliffe, Hurworth, Middleton St George and Sadberge & Whessoe (part of the Sedgefield parliamentary constituency.

As well as Darlington itself the borough includes the surrounding villages of:

It is also home to Durham Tees Valley Airport (previously known as Teesside International Airport), of which the borough council shares joint ownership with the other four Tees Valley councils and Peel Holdings.

The council operates a Leader and Cabinet model of political leadership although a group of local residents aimed to force a referendum on moving to a system with directly-elected executive Mayor.[1] Their bid was unsuccessful.

The political composition of the council, as of a May 2015 local elections, is Labour 29; Conservative 17; Liberal Democrats 3 and Independent 1.

Political party make-up of Darlington Borough Council
   Party Seats[2][3] Current council
  Labour 29                                                                      
  Conservative 17                                                                      
  Lib Dems 3                                                                      
  Independent 1                                                                      

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Darlington at current basic prices published (pp. 240–253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added4 Agriculture1 Industry2 Services3
1995 1,115 8 377 729
2000 1,192 6 417 768
2003 1,538 6 561 971

^1 includes hunting and forestry

^2 includes energy and construction

^3 includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

^4 Components may not sum to totals due to rounding

References

  1. ^ "Pro-mayor group halfway to securing a referendum". The Northern Echo. 29 August 2006. Retrieved 29 August 2007.
  2. ^ "Local Election Results 2011 Summary". Association of Liberal Democrat Councillors. Archived from the original on 23 December 2012. Retrieved 22 July 2011.
  3. ^ "North Road by-election results". Darlington Borough Council. Retrieved 30 December 2009.

External links

Video clips

Coordinates: 54°31′00″N 1°33′00″W / 54.5167°N 1.5500°W

Barmpton

Barmpton is a small village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of

County Durham, England. The population taken at the 2011 Census was less than 100. Details are maintained in the parish of Great Burdon. It is situated a short distance to the north-east of Darlington, on the River Skerne, a tributary of the Tees.

Brafferton, County Durham

Brafferton is a village and civil parish in County Durham, England. It is administered as part of the borough of Darlington. The population of Brafferton Parish taken at the 2011 census was 154. It is situated between Darlington and Newton Aycliffe, a short distance from Coatham Mundeville.

Brafferton itself has few amenities, but nearby is the Darlington town centre, a local public house - The Foresters Arms - and the Hall Garth Hotel. Brafferton is near the A1 junction 59.

The Durham Ox was bred at Ketton Hall in Brafferton.

Coatham Mundeville

Coatham Mundeville is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of

County Durham, England. It is situated a short distance from Brafferton, on the A167 between Newton Aycliffe and Darlington.

DL postcode area

The DL postcode area, also known as the Darlington postcode area, is a group of seventeen postcode districts in England, which are subdivisions of fourteen post towns. These districts cover central County Durham (including Darlington, Bishop Auckland, Ferryhill, Crook, Spennymoor, Shildon, Barnard Castle and Newton Aycliffe), northern North Yorkshire (including Northallerton, Bedale, Hawes, Leyburn, Richmond and Catterick Garrison) and a very small part of Cumbria.

Darlington

Darlington is a large market town in County Durham, in North East England. With a population of 105,564 in 2011, the town lies on the River Skerne, a tributary of the River Tees. The town is administered as part of the Borough of Darlington. The town owes much of its development to the influence of local Quaker families in the Georgian and Victorian era, and who provided much of the finance and vision in creating the Stockton and Darlington Railway, the world's first steam locomotive powered, permanent passenger railway. The town is often colloquially referred to as 'Darlo'.

Darlington Borough Council elections

Darlington is a unitary authority in County Durham, England. Until 1 April 1997 it was a non-metropolitan district.

Great Burdon

Great Burdon is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated to the north-east of Darlington.

Great Stainton

Great Stainton is a village in the borough of Darlington and ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated to the north of Darlington, and to the west of Stockton-on-Tees. Elstob is a hamlet, just north of Great Stainton, which is part of the Parish of Great Stainton. The population as taken at the Census 2011 was less than 100. Details are now maintained in the parish of Little Stainton.

Headlam

Headlam is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of

County Durham, England. It lies to the west of Darlington. The population taken at the 2011 Census was less than 100. Details are included in the parish of Ingleton. The hamlet has 14 stone houses plus 17th-century Headlam Hall, now a country house hotel. The village is set around a village green with a medieval cattle-pound and an old stone packhorse bridge across the beck. Headlam is classed as Lower Teesdale and has views to the south as far as Richmond and to the Cleveland Hills in the east.

In the Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870–72) John Marius Wilson described Headlam:

HEADLAM, a township in Gainford parish, Durham: 7½ miles WNW of Darlington. Acres, 780. Real property, £1,216. Pop., 102. Houses, 21.

Houghton-le-Side

Houghton-le-Side is a small village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated a few miles to the south-west of Newton Aycliffe. The population at the 2011 Census was less than 100. Details are now maintained within the parish of Walworth.

Hurworth-on-Tees

Hurworth-on-Tees is a village in the borough of Darlington, within the ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated in the civil parish of Hurworth. The village lies to the south of Darlington on the River Tees, close to its meeting point with the River Skerne, and immediately adjoins the village of Hurworth Place, which forms part of the same civil parish.

Killerby, County Durham

Killerby is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated a few miles to the west of Darlington. At the 2011 Census the population was less than 100. Details are maintained in the parish of Staindrop.

In the Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870–72) John Marius Wilson described Killerby:

KILLERBY, a township in Heighington parish, Durham; 7 miles NW of Darlington. Acres, 605. Real property, £1, 063. Pop., 109. Houses, 20. This place is a meet for the Raby hounds.

List of schools in Darlington

This is a list of schools in the Borough of Darlington in County Durham, England.

Little Stainton

Little Stainton is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of

County Durham, England. It is a township in the parish of Bishopton, County Durham, situated a few miles west of Stockton-on-Tees. From the Census 2011 the population of Little Stainton has included that of Great Stainton and was 193. It is a hamlet, consisting of houses and farms that have no local service facilities, except for a public telephone kiosk and bus stop. On one side of the street, a stream—Bishopton Beck—runs along the bottom of the gardens.

Middleton St George

Middleton St George is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, England.

It had a population measured at 3,779 at the 2011 Census and is situated approximately two miles from the outskirts of Darlington. It has grown rapidly since the mid-1990s, becoming a commuter area for Darlington. The population of the Darlington ward in question again taken at the 2011 Census was 4,650.

Municipality of Darlington

The Municipality of Darlington was a local government area of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The municipality was proclaimed in 1864 and, with an area of 0.2 square kilometres, was the smallest municipal council in Sydney. It included the entire suburb of Darlington, excepting a small block between Golden Grove and Forbes streets, which was administered by the Municipality of Redfern in Golden Grove Ward. The council was amalgamated, along with most of its neighbours, with the City of Sydney to the north with the passing of the Local Government (Areas) Act 1948. From 1968 to 1982 and from 1989 to 2004, the area was part of the South Sydney councils.

Neasham

Neasham is a village approximately four miles to the south east of Darlington in County Durham, England.

Sadberge

Sadberge is a village in County Durham, England, situated between Darlington and Stockton-on-Tees. It is administered as part of the borough of Darlington.

Summerhouse, County Durham

Summerhouse is a village in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, England. It is situated a few miles to the north-west of Darlington. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 Census was 143. Since 2009 it has been home to the two Michelin star restaurant The Raby Hunt.

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