Books in the United States

As of 2018, several firms in the United States rank among the world's biggest publishers of books in terms of revenue: Cengage Learning, HarperCollins, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, McGraw-Hill Education, Scholastic, Simon & Schuster, and Wiley.[1][nb 1]

History

See also: English Short Title Catalogue, 15th-18th centuries; Early American Imprints, 1639-1819

In 1640 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Stephen Daye produced the first book printed in British North America, the Bay Psalm Book.[4]

The American Library Association formed in 1876, and the Bibliographical Society of America in 1904. The national Center for the Book began in 1977.

Types

Bookselling

See also: Bookselling in the US, Bookstores of the US, List of US booksellers' associations, Antiquarian book trade in the US, List of booksellers in Boston

Popular books in the 19th century included Sheldon's In His Steps (1896). 20th century bestsellers included Mitchell's Gone with the Wind (1936), Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People (1937), Spock’s Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care (1946), Harris’ I'm OK – You're OK (1969), Woodward and Bernstein's All the President's Men (1974). Recent bestsellers have included Warren’s Purpose-Driven Life (2002) and Brown's Da Vinci Code (2003).[5]

The influential "New York Times Best Seller list" first appeared in 1931. The online bookseller Amazon.com began business in July 1995, based in the state of Washington.[6][7]

Fairs

Clubs

Collections

Some notable collections of books of the United States include:

Digitization

The nonprofit Internet Archive began scanning books in 2004, in the same year that Google Inc. launched Google Book Search. In 2005, Google began scanning pages of volumes in several large research libraries in the US, as part of its new Google Books Library Project. The Open Content Alliance formed in 2005.

In popular culture

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Of these, several also topped the list in 2016 and 2017.[2][3]

References

  1. ^ "The World's 54 Largest Publishers, 2018", Publishers Weekly, US, 265 (38), 14 September 2018
  2. ^ "World's 52 Largest Book Publishers, 2016", Publishers Weekly, US, 26 August 2016
  3. ^ "World's 54 Largest Publishers, 2017", Publishers Weekly, US, 25 August 2017
  4. ^ Boyer 2001.
  5. ^ "Best Seller", Britannica.com, retrieved November 30, 2017
  6. ^ "The Next Big Thing: A Bookstore?", Fortune.com, December 9, 1996
  7. ^ "Amazon.com". Archived from the original on 1999-08-28. Retrieved 2018-11-09 – via Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ "Book Club of California". Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  9. ^ "The Caxton Club". Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  10. ^ "Florida Bibliophile Society". Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  11. ^ "The Grolier Club". Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  12. ^ "The Ticknor Society". Retrieved March 11, 2017.

Bibliography

Published in 19th century

Published in 20th century

Published in 21st century

External links

Images

1855 power press Harper and Brothers NYC

Harper & Brothers printing press, New York City, 1850s

Wizard oz 1900 cover

Cover of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz children's book, 1900; published by George M. Hill Company, Chicago

Kochbuch

Bestseller Joy of Cooking cookbook, first published in 1931

1940 bookshop Chicago 8a06706v

Bookshop, Chicago, 1940

BookShopNewOrleansVachon

De Forest Book Shop, New Orleans, 1943

Powell's Books - Portland - Oregon - USA - 01

Powell's bookshop est. 1971, Portland, Oregon (photo 2012)

Gaby Dempsey, 12, Kate Murray, 13, and Mackenzie Grewell, 13, read in the Red Room of the White House, 2012

Children reading in the White House, 2012

Vendor Booths at 2016 Texas Book Festival

Texas Book Festival est. 1996, Austin, Texas (photo 2016)

Alex Rider

Alex Rider is a series of spy novels by Anthony Horowitz about a 14-15-year-old spy named Alex Rider. The series is aimed primarily at teens and young adults. The series comprises eleven novels, as well as five graphic novels, three short stories and a supplementary book. The first novel, Stormbreaker, was released in the United Kingdom in 2000 and was adapted into a motion picture in 2006 starring Alex Pettyfer. A video game based on the film was released in 2006, which received negative reviews. The novels are published by Walker Books in the United States. They were first published by Puffin in the United States, but have been published more recently by Philomel Books, also an imprint of Penguin Books. The audio books are read by Simon Prebble. The eleventh novel, Never Say Die, was released in June 2017. Horowitz has had great success with the series.

All-American Publications

All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that merged to form the modern day DC Comics, one of two largest publishers of comic books in the United States. Superheroes created for All-American include the original Atom, Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, and Wonder Woman, all in the 1940s' Golden Age of Comic Books.

B. Dalton

B. Dalton Bookseller (often called B. Dalton or B. Dalton's) was an American retail bookstore chain founded in 1966 by Bruce Dayton, a member of the same family that operated the Dayton's department store chain. B. Dalton expanded to become the largest retailer of hardcover books in the United States, with 798 stores at the peak of the chain's success.Located primarily in shopping malls, B. Dalton competed primarily with Waldenbooks. Barnes & Noble acquired the chain from Dayton's in 1987 and continued to operate it until a late 2009 announcement that the last 50 stores would be liquidated by January 2010.

Bookplate

A bookplate (or book-plate, as it was commonly styled until the early 20th century), also known as ex-librīs (Latin for "from the books (or library) of"), is usually a small printed or decorative label pasted into a book, often on the front endpaper, to indicate ownership. Simple typographical bookplates are termed "book labels".Bookplates typically bear a name, motto, device (coat-of-arms), crest, badge, or another motif that relates to the owner of the book, or is requested by the owner from an artist or designer. The name of the owner usually follows an inscription such as "from the books of..." or "from the library of...", or in Latin, "ex libris". Bookplates are important evidence for the provenance of books.

In the United States, bookplates replaced book rhymes after the 19th century.

Comics Code Authority

The Comics Code Authority (CCA) was formed in 1954 by the Comics Magazine Association of America as an alternative to government regulation, to allow the comic publishers to self-regulate the content of comic books in the United States. Its code, commonly called "the Comics Code", lasted until the early 21st century. Many have linked the CCA's formation to a series of Senate hearings and the publication of psychiatrist Fredric Wertham's book Seduction of the Innocent.

Members submitted comics to the CCA, which screened them for adherence to its Code, then authorized the use of their seal on the cover if the book was found to be in compliance. At the height of its influence, it was a de facto censor for the U.S. comic book industry.

By the early 2000s, publishers bypassed the CCA and Marvel Comics abandoned it in 2001. By 2010, only three major publishers still adhered to it: DC Comics, Archie Comics, and Bongo Comics. Bongo broke with the CCA in 2010. DC and Archie followed in January 2011, rendering the Code completely defunct.

Furies of Calderon

Furies of Calderon is the first novel in the high fantasy series Codex Alera by Jim Butcher. The novel was first released by Ace Books in the United States as a Hardcover edition on October 5, 2004, followed by a Paperback edition on June 26, 2005. Orbit Books released a paperback edition in the United Kingdom in December 2009. It tells the story of a young boy named Tavi who is the only one without any fury crafting abilities.

The novel was well received, with critics praising Butcher's turn at a more traditional fantasy setting, fast pacing, action, and his characterization of the antagonists.

How to Eat Fried Worms

How to Eat Fried Worms is a children's book written by Thomas Rockwell, first published in 1973. The novel's plot involves a couple of students eating worms as part of a bet. It has been the frequent target of censors and appears on the American Library Association's list of most commonly challenged books in the United States of 1990-2000 at number 96. It was later turned into a CBS Storybreak episode in the mid-1980s, and a movie of the same name in 2006.

The story continues in two sequels: How to Fight a Girl and How to Get Fabulously Rich.

Library of Congress Control Number

The Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.

List of most commonly challenged books in the United States

A challenged book is one that is sought to be removed or otherwise restricted from public access, typically from a library or a school curriculum. This is a list of the most commonly challenged books in the United States. It is primarily based on data gathered by the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF). The OIF gathers their data from media reports from reports from librarians and teachers.According to the OIF, the top three reasons for challenging such materials were that they contained "sexually explicit" content, "offensive" language, or were "unsuited to age group".

Little, Brown and Company

Little, Brown and Company is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors. Early lists featured Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson's poetry, and Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. As of 2016, Little, Brown & Company is a division of the Hachette Book Group.

Man's Search for Meaning

Man's Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, and describing his psychotherapeutic method, which involved identifying a purpose in life to feel positively about, and then immersively imagining that outcome. According to Frankl, the way a prisoner imagined the future affected his longevity. The book intends to answer the question "How was everyday life in a concentration camp reflected in the mind of the average prisoner?" Part One constitutes Frankl's analysis of his experiences in the concentration camps, while Part Two introduces his ideas of meaning and his theory called logotherapy.

According to a survey conducted by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the Library of Congress, Man's Search for Meaning belongs to a list of "the ten most influential books in the United States." At the time of the author's death in 1997, the book had sold over 10 million copies and had been translated into 24 languages.Holocaust analyst, Lawrence L. Langer would review the book and find both Frankl's promotion of his logotherapy ideology, the problematic subtext, the tone of self-aggrandizement and general inhumane sense of studying-detachment that Frankl appears to have treated the victims of the holocaust, as all deeply problematic. It is for this and the other controversial facets of Frankl's career, that one cannot find any of Frankl's works, in the bookstore of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C.

R. A. Salvatore

Robert Anthony Salvatore (born January 20, 1959) is an American author best known for The DemonWars Saga, his Forgotten Realms novels, for which he created the popular character Drizzt Do'Urden, and Vector Prime, the first novel in the Star Wars: The New Jedi Order series. He has sold more than 15 million copies of his books in the United States alone and twenty-two of his titles have been New York Times best-sellers.

Steve Hagen

Stephen Tokan "Steve" Hagen, Rōshi, (born 1945) is the founder and head teacher of the Dharma Field Zen Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and a Dharma heir of Dainin Katagiri-roshi. Additionally, he is the author of several books on Buddhism. Among them as of 2003, Buddhism Plain & Simple was one of the top five bestselling Buddhism books in the United States. In 2012, Hagen updated and revised How the World Can Be the Way It Is and published it as Why the World Doesn't Seem to Make Sense—an Inquiry into Science, Philosophy, and Perception.

The New York Times Best Seller list

The New York Times Best Seller list is widely considered the preeminent list of best-selling books in the United States. Published weekly in The New York Times Book Review, the best-seller list has been published in the Times since October 12, 1931. In recent years it has evolved into multiple lists in different categories, broken down by fiction and non-fiction, hardcover, paperback, and electronic, and different genres.

The list is based on sales figures but the objectivity has been questioned several times, and in 1983 (as part of a legal argument) the Times stated that the list is not mathematically objective but rather editorial content.

The Two Georges

The Two Georges is an alternate history novel co-written by science fiction author Harry Turtledove and Oscar-winning actor Richard Dreyfuss. It was originally published in 1995 by Hodder & Stoughton in the United Kingdom, and in 1996 by Tor Books in the United States, and was nominated for the 1995 Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta is a British graphic novel written by Alan Moore and illustrated by David Lloyd (with additional art by Tony Weare). Initially published in black and white as an ongoing serial in the short-lived UK anthology Warrior, it morphed into a ten-issue limited series published by DC Comics. Subsequent collected editions have been typically published under DC's more specialized imprint Vertigo. The story depicts a dystopian and post-apocalyptic near-future history version of the United Kingdom in the 1990s, preceded by a nuclear war in the 1980s which had devastated most of the rest of the world. The Nordic supremacist and neo-fascist Norsefire political party has exterminated its opponents in concentration camps and rules the country as a police state.

The comics follow its title character and protagonist, V, an anarchist revolutionary dressed in a Guy Fawkes mask, as he begins an elaborate and theatrical revolutionist campaign to kill his former captors, bring down the fascist state and convince the people to abandon democracy in favour of anarchy, while inspiring a young woman, Evey Hammond, to be his protégé.

DC Comics had sold more than 500,000 copies of the books in the United States as of 2006. Warner Bros. released a film adaptation of the same title in 2005.

Viz Media

VIZ Media LLC is an American manga and anime distribution and entertainment company headquartered in San Francisco, California. It was founded in 1986 as VIZ LLC. In 2005, VIZ LLC and ShoPro Entertainment merged to form the current VIZ Media LLC, which is jointly owned by Japanese publishers Shueisha, Shogakukan and Shogakukan-Shueisha Productions (ShoPro). As of 2017, Viz Media is the largest publisher of graphic novels and comic books in the United States, with a 23% share of the market.

Why I Am Not a Muslim

Why I Am Not a Muslim, a book written by Ibn Warraq, is a critique of Islam and the Qur'an. It was first published by Prometheus Books in the United States in 1995. The title of the book is a homage to Bertrand Russell's essay, Why I Am Not a Christian, in which Russell criticizes the religion in which he was raised.

Outraged over the fatwa and death threats against Salman Rushdie, Ibn Warraq assumes a pseudonym to pen what one critic calls "serious and thought-provoking book" using a "sledge-hammer" approach to "demolish" Islam. The author's "polemic" criticizes Islam's mythology, theology, historic achievements, and current cultural influence. Warraq, drawing largely on previous research, provides an "invaluable compilation" of Islam's shortcomings. He "makes a compelling case" that Islam is "flatly incompatible" with "individual rights and liberties of a liberal, democratic, secular state".

Wonderful Today

Wonderful Today, subtitled The Autobiography, is the 2007 autobiography by English former fashion model and photographer Pattie Boyd, written with journalist and broadcaster Penny Junor. It was published by Headline Review in Britain, on 23 August 2007, and by Harmony Books in the United States, where it was titled Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me. Beginning with her childhood in Kenya, the book covers Boyd's modelling career in London during the 1960s, her marriage to and divorce from Beatle George Harrison and later marriage and divorce of Harrison's best friend, Eric Clapton. The book's title is in reference to Clapton's 1977 song "Wonderful Tonight", which he wrote about Boyd.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.