Body suit (tattoo)

A body suit or full body suit is an extensive tattoo, usually of a similar pattern, style or theme that covers the entire torso or the entire body.

They are associated with freak show and circus performers, as well as with traditional Japanese tattooing.

Such suits are of significant cultural meaning in some traditional cultures, representing a rite of passage, marriage or a social designation.

The example pictured of a full body suit in progress displays a horned snake on the chest that wraps around to the back continuing onto the right arm, two birds on the left arm, a foo dog on the right leg and a mouse and monkey on the left leg.

Body Suit Front
Body Suit Back

Full sleeve

Fullbodytattoo
Tattoo artist working on a body suit.
Phoenix full sleeve tattoo by Maaika
Phoenix full sleeve tattoo.

A 'full sleeve' is a tattoo which completely covers an arm, from the shoulder to the wrist. A 'full sleeve' can be part of a 'full body suit'.

Camouflage

Full sleeve on scar tissue
This 'full sleeve' has been used to camouflage extended scar tissue, rendering it 'invisible'.

Backpiece

A 'backpiece' is a tattoo which largely or completely covers the back, and can be part of a 'full body suit'.

Backpiece tattoo as part of a bodysuit
Man with a full back Christian and Enlightenment tattoo. Color
Man with a backpiece Christian and Enlightenment tattoo. Color
Crusade tattoo
Japan Tattoo 1890s

Notable wearers

See also

External links

Lucky Diamond Rich

Lucky Diamond Rich, or just Lucky Rich (born Gregory Paul McLaren in 1971), is a New Zealand man who is "the world's most tattooed person", a title formerly held by Tom Leppard. He has tattoos covering his entire body, including the insides of his eyelids, mouth, ears and foreskin. He has held the certified Guinness World Records title since 2006, being 100 percent tattooed.He is a performance artist, street performer, and international arts festival performer whose act includes sword swallowing and juggling a variety of items while on a unicycle.

Tattoo

A tattoo is a form of body modification where a design is made by inserting ink, dyes and pigments, either indelible or temporary, into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment. The art of making tattoos is tattooing.

Tattoos fall into three broad categories: purely decorative (with no specific meaning); symbolic (with a specific meaning pertinent to the wearer); pictorial (a depiction of a specific person or item). In addition, tattoos can be used for identification such as ear tattoos on livestock as a form of branding.

Tattooed Lady

Tattooed ladies were working class women who acquired tattoos and performed in circuses, sideshows, and dime show museums as means for earning a substantial living. At the height of their popularity during the turn of the 20th century, tattooed ladies transgressed Victorian gender norms by showcasing their bodies in scantily clad clothing and earned a salary considerably larger than their male counterparts.Tattooed ladies often used captivity narratives as a means for excusing their appearance, and to tantalize the audience. The popularity of tattooed ladies waned with the onset of television.

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