Bobby Winkles

Bobby Brooks Winkles (born March 11, 1930) is a former baseball coach at Arizona State University and manager in Major League Baseball. Winkles is a graduate of Illinois Wesleyan University, where he became a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. A right-handed-hitting and -throwing infielder, he played minor league baseball in the Chicago White Sox organization between 1951 and 1958, hitting .270 with 890 hits in 858 games played before retiring to become Arizona State's head baseball coach at age 29.

Bobby Winkles
Personal information
Full nameBobby Brooks Winkles
BornMarch 11, 1930 (age 89)
Tuckerman, Arkansas, United States
Alma materIllinois Wesleyan University
Sport
CountryUnited States
Sportbaseball
Updated on December 2, 2013.

Success at Arizona State

From 1959–1971 Winkles was Arizona State's first varsity baseball coach, where he laid the foundation for the legacy of Sun Devil baseball. His overall record while head coach at ASU was 524–173, a winning percentage of .751. In his 11 years, Winkles coached ASU to its first three national titles (1965, 1967 and 1969). He also coached several great players while he was at the helm of the Sun Devils, including Rick Monday, Sal Bando, Reggie Jackson, Sterling Slaughter, and Larry Gura.

Winkles was named the 1965 and 1969 NCAA Coach of the Year and The Sporting News Coach of the Year in 1965, 1967 and 1969. Winkles was inducted into the ABCA Collegiate Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. His No. 1 jersey was honored at Packard Stadium and the field was named in his honor.

Big league career

In 1972, he jumped from the Arizona State campus to the major leagues as a coach for the California Angels of the American League. In 1973, Winkles became the Angels' manager, succeeding Del Rice.[1] His 1973 club won 79, lost 83 and finished fourth in the American League West Division. But in 1974, the Angels lost 44 of their first 75 games and Winkles was fired on June 26 and replaced with Dick Williams.

On July 8, two weeks after the Angels fired him, Winkles became third base coach for the Oakland Athletics and was a member of their 1974 World Series championship team as well as their 1975 AL West champions under skipper Alvin Dark. After Dark's firing, Winkles then spent 1976 through June 25, 1977, as a coach for the cross-bay San Francisco Giants.

On June 26, Winkles returned to the Athletics to manage Oakland for parts of the 1977 and 1978 seasons, as he replaced (in 1977) and then was succeeded by (in 1978) the same manager: Jack McKeon. The A's were then a struggling outfit in the final throes of the Charlie Finley era. But Winkles' 1978 team roared to a shocking 19–5 start by May 5, and was still 24–15 after sweeping a doubleheader against the White Sox on May 21 when Winkles resigned with his club in first place in the AL West.[2] Winkles was reported to have resigned because of Finley's micro-management style.[3] His final managerial record: 170 wins, 213 defeats (.444).

A coaching stint with the White Sox immediately followed Winkles' 1978 resignation as the A's manager, and he was a member of the White Sox staff through 1981. Then, from 1982–85, Winkles led the player development department of the Montreal Expos, when the Expos had one of the most productive farm systems in the game. He was a coach on the MLB Expos' staff from 1986 through 1988, then moved into the broadcast booth as an analyst on the Expos' radio network from 1989 through 1993. In 2006, he was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame.

References

  1. ^ "Winkles is named manager of Angels". Spartanburg Herald. 12 October 1972. p. D2. Retrieved 15 June 2010.
  2. ^ "A's Winkles Steps Down". The Associated Press. The New York Times. 24 May 1978. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  3. ^ Launius, Roger D.; Green, G. Michael (2010). Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman. New York: Walker Publishing Co. p. 284. ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0.

External links

1965 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team

The 1965 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team represented Arizona State University in the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Bobby Winkles in his 7th season at Arizona State.

The Sun Devils won the College World Series, defeating the Ohio State Buckeyes in the championship game.

1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its nineteenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 23 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The nineteenth tournament's champion was Arizona State, coached by Bobby Winkles. The Most Outstanding Player was Sal Bando of Arizona State.

1967 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team

The 1967 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team represented Arizona State University in the 1967 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Bobby Winkles in his 9th season at Arizona State.

The Sun Devils won the College World Series, defeating the Houston Cougars in the championship game.

1967 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1967 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1967 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-first year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 25 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-first tournament's champion was Arizona State, coached by Bobby Winkles. The Most Outstanding Player was Ron Davini of Arizona State.

1969 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team

The 1969 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team represented Arizona State University in the 1969 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Bobby Winkles in his 11th season at Arizona State.

The Sun Devils won the College World Series, defeating the Tulsa Golden Hurricane in the championship game.

1969 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1969 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1969 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-third year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 23 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-third tournament's champion was Arizona State, coached by Bobby Winkles. The Most Outstanding Player was John Dolinsek of Arizona State.

1973 California Angels season

The 1973 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing fourth in the American League West with a record of 79 wins and 83 losses.

1974 California Angels season

The 1974 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 68 wins and 94 losses.

1977 Oakland Athletics season

The 1977 Oakland Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished 7th in the American League West with a record of 63 wins and 98 losses. Paid attendance for the season was 495,578, one of the worst attendance figures for the franchise during the 1970s.

Arizona State Sun Devils baseball

The Arizona State Sun Devils baseball program at the Arizona State University (ASU) is part of the Pac-12 Conference. Since it became a member of the Pac-12, it had the highest winning percentage, at .681, of all schools that participate in Division I baseball within the conference. ASU's NCAA leading 54 consecutive 30 win seasons was the longest streak in the nation. The Sun Devils' only losing seasons occurred in 1963, 2017,& 2018 The Sun Devils had been nationally ranked during at least a part of every season of their 58-year history until 2017. The Sun Devils have finished 27 times in the Top 10, 22 times in the Top 5, and 5 times as the No. 1 team in the nation.ASU is one of the most successful college baseball programs in the country. The Sun Devils have won five national championships, the fourth-most by any school, and are 1st in total number of alumni to ever play in Major League Baseball. Notable Sun Devil baseball alumni include Barry Bonds, Reggie Jackson, Dustin Pedroia, Andre Ethier, Bob Horner, Paul Lo Duca, and Rick Monday.

College World Series

The College World Series (CWS) is an annual June baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska. The CWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

Irv Noren

Irving Arnold Noren (born November 29, 1924) is an American former professional baseball and basketball player. He was an outfielder in the Major Leagues from 1950 through 1960 for the Washington Senators, New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Los Angeles Dodgers. He also played for the National Basketball League's Chicago American Gears in 1946–47. Later in his baseball career, Noren was a minor league manager and the third-base coach of the 1972–73 World Series champion Oakland Athletics. As a player and coach between 1950 and 1975, Noren was a member of five world championship teams.

Noren was born in Jamestown, New York, but grew up from the age of 12 in Pasadena, California, where he graduated from high school. Noren then attended Pasadena City College and played basketball as well as baseball. His collegiate career was interrupted by service in the United States Army during World War II.

Jim Brock

Jim Brock (July 24, 1936 – June 12, 1994) was the head coach of the Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team for 23 seasons from 1972 until his death in 1994.During his first year as head coach, Brock managed his team to a 64-6 record. That mark remains the NCAA record for all-time winning percentage in a single season (.914). Jim Brock's record at ASU was 1,100-440 (.714), and he also led ASU to thirteen College World Series appearances. In 1994, Brock battled liver and colon cancer that would take his life one day after the conclusion of the College World Series. Though his strength was waning, Brock did not miss a conference game through the '94 season. He led his team through the regional tournament at Knoxville, Tennessee, and was in the dugout when the Sun Devils beat University of Miami, 4-0, in the opener of the College World Series. Speaking in little more than a whisper, he gave his team an inspirational pep talk after a scoreless first inning when he sensed that the Sun Devils were flat. "You can make an assumption that you'll be up because it's the College World Series," Brock said, "But you spend so much emotion in the final game of the regional that you sometimes have to find a way to regain that emotion." On his way to Rosenblatt Stadium (home of the College World Series), for the second game of the Series, Brock's condition worsened. The Sun Devils went on to lose to the University of Oklahoma, 4-3, in the home half of the eleventh inning. Brock was airlifted from Omaha to a Mesa hospital shortly before game number three. His Sun Devils went on to hit five home runs to eliminate top seeded Miami, 9-5, presenting him with his 1,100th coaching victory. Later, Oklahoma eliminated ASU from the series and went on to capture the national title. On June 12, 1994, three days after his team's season ended, Brock died of colon cancer. He was 57. Brock was posthumously voted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

Brock coached ASU to two College World Series Championships in 1977 and 1981, and was named National Coach of the Year four different times in his career (1977, 1981, 1984, 1988). Brock sent 175 players into professional baseball—an average of almost eight per year. Brock coached seven first round picks and all of ASU's three Golden Spike winners. He was a five-time winner of the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) Coach of the Year. Jim Brock's No. 33 is retired by ASU, and in 2006, Bobby Winkles Field-Packard Stadium at Brock Ballpark was dedicated to Brock.

List of Los Angeles Angels managers

There have been 21 managers in the history of the Los Angeles Angels Major League Baseball franchise. The Angels are based in Anaheim, California. They are members of the American League West division of the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Angels franchise was formed in 1961 as a member of the American League. The team was formerly called the California Angels, the Anaheim Angels, and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, before settling with the Los Angeles Angels.

Bill Rigney became the first manager of the then Los Angeles Angels in 1961, serving for just over eight seasons before being fired by Angels owner Gene Autry during the 1969 season. In terms of tenure, Mike Scioscia has managed more games and seasons than any other coach in franchise history. He managed the Angels to six playoff berths (2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, and 2009) led the team to a World Series championship in 2002, and won the Manager of the Year award in 2002 and 2009. With the Angels' 2009 Playoff appearance, Mike Scioscia became the first Major League Baseball manager "to guide his team to playoffs six times in [his] first 10 seasons." None of Scioscia's predecessors made it to the World Series. Dick Williams and Whitey Herzog, who served as an interim manager immediately before Williams, are the only Angels managers to have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

There have been 16 interim managers in Angels history. In 1969, manager Bill Rigney was fired and replaced by Lefty Phillips. In 1974, manager Whitey Herzog replaced Bobby Winkles. After four games with Herzog at the helm, Dick Williams took over the managerial job and was then replaced with Norm Sherry. A year later, Sherry was replaced by Dave Garcia. Garcia didn't last a full season either, as Jim Fregosi took over as manager in 1978. In 1981, Fregosi was replaced in the mid-season by Gene Mauch. In 1988, manager Cookie Rojas was replaced eight games before the end of the season. After a start of 61 wins and 63 losses in 1991, manager Doug Rader was fired and was replaced by Buck Rodgers. A season later, Rodgers was replaced by Marcel Lachemann, who took the position for four games. He was then succeeded by John Wathan. Rodgers returned as manager in 1993, but he was soon replaced by Lachemann. In 1996, Lachemann was replaced by John McNamara, who in turn was replaced by Joe Maddon. In 1999, Terry Collins resigned as manager in mid-season. Joe Maddon finished the season. Mauch, Rodgers, Lachemann, McNamara, and Maddon have had two stints as manager.

As of 2019, Brad Ausmus replaced Mike Scioscia as manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

List of Montreal Expos broadcasters

Broadcasters for the Montreal Expos Major League Baseball team.

List of Oakland Athletics managers

The Oakland Athletics are a professional baseball team based in Oakland, California. Before moving to Oakland in 1968, the team played in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 1901 through 1954 and in Kansas City, Missouri from 1955 through 1967. The Athletics are members of the American League (AL) West division in Major League Baseball (MLB). In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. The team has employed 30 different managers in its history. The current Athletics' manager is Bob Melvin.The franchise's first manager was Hall of Famer Connie Mack, who managed the team for its first fifty seasons. Mack led the Athletics to nine AL championships and five World Series championships—in 1910, 1911, 1913, 1929 and 1930. The team lost the World Series in 1905, 1914 and 1931, and no World Series was played when the Athletics won the AL championship in 1902. After Jimmy Dykes replaced Mack as the Athletics' manager in 1951, no manager served more than three consecutive seasons until Tony La Russa, who became the Athletics' manager in 1986. During this period, Dick Williams managed the Athletics to two consecutive World Series championships in 1972 and 1973, and Alvin Dark managed the team to a third consecutive World Series championship in 1974. La Russa managed the Athletics to three consecutive AL championships from 1988 through 1990, winning the World Series in 1989.Connie Mack holds the Athletics' records for most games managed, 7,466; most wins as a manager, 3,582; and most losses as a manager, 3,814. Williams has the highest winning percentage of any Athletics manager, .603. Four managers have served multiple terms as the Athletics' manager. Connie Mack's son Earle Mack served as interim manager twice, in 1937 and 1939, when his father was ill. Hank Bauer served as the Athletics' manager from 1961 to 1962, and then again in 1969. Dark served as the Athletics' manager from 1966 to 1967 and again from 1974 to 1975. Jack McKeon started the 1977 season as the Athletics' manager, was replaced by Bobby Winkles after 53 games, and then replaced Winkles part way through the 1978 season. Five Athletics' managers have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Connie Mack, Lou Boudreau, Joe Gordon, Luke Appling and Williams. Mack and Williams were inducted into the Hall of Fame as managers. Boudreau, Gordon and Appling were inducted as players.

List of Washington Nationals owners and executives

This is a list of Montreal Expos and Washington Nationals owners and executives.

(This Major League Baseball franchise played as the Montreal Expos from 1969 through 2004 and has played as the Washington Nationals since 2005.)

Packard Stadium

Packard Stadium is a college baseball stadium in Tempe, Arizona, and was the home field of the Arizona State Sun Devils of the Pac-12 Conference from 1974 to 2014.

The stadium was built in 1974 and named for William Guthrie Packard, longtime president of Shepard's Citations. It was made possible by a gift from his children, Guthrie and Peter, who were ASU alumni.

In 2001, the playing surface was renamed Bobby Winkles Field in honor of Bobby Winkles, the school's first varsity baseball coach, who coached the Sun Devils to a 574-173 record (.768) from 1959-71. In 2006, the name of Jim Brock, the school's all-time winningest varsity coach, was added to the stadium. Brock coached the Sun Devils to a 1,100-440 record (.714) from 1972–94, As a result, the full name of the stadium was "Bobby Winkles Field-Packard Stadium at Brock Ballpark."

Packard Stadium has undergone upgrade renovations since 1997. The construction of a $1 million players clubhouse and events plaza down the left field line was completed in August 2004. The structure features a state-of-the-art clubhouse for the Sun Devil players, including custom hardwood lockers, a training room, video room and an equipment storage area. The top level of the clubhouse serves as an events plaza for hosted outings during games and also features an office for the coaching staff. The outfield wall, including a center field green monster, is lined with orange trees and just beyond the left field fence lies the Tempe Town Lake.The Sun Devils have an all-time record of 2,358-1,154 (.671) in 93 seasons of baseball. The Sun Devils have made 33 post-season appearances and 21 College World Series appearances. With five NCAA titles (1965, 1967, 1969, 1977, 1981), ASU is tied for third. In 46 years of varsity baseball dating back to 1959, ASU is 2,025-809-1 (.714).Packard's existence was made possible through a gift to Arizona State from Guthrie and Peter Packard. Both are alumni of ASU, and the stadium is a tribute to their late father, a prominent member of the publishing industry for many years. Mr. Packard served Shepard's Citations for 51 years rising to president and chairman of the board.In 2013, the Sun Devils ranked 20th among Division I baseball programs in attendance, averaging 2,809 per home game.

Sal Bando

Salvatore Leonard Bando (born February 13, 1944) is a former third baseman and executive in professional baseball who played for the Kansas City and Oakland Athletics (1966–76) and Milwaukee Brewers (1977–81). He played college baseball at Arizona State University for coach Bobby Winkles.

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