Bobby Wallace (baseball)

Roderick John "Bobby" Wallace (November 4, 1873 – November 3, 1960) was a Major League Baseball infielder, pitcher, manager, umpire, and scout.

Bobby Wallace
Bobby Wallace Cardinals.jpeg
Shortstop / Pitcher / Manager
Born: November 4, 1873
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died: November 3, 1960 (aged 86)
Torrance, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 15, 1894, for the Cleveland Spiders
Last MLB appearance
September 2, 1918, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.268
HIts2,309
Home runs34
Runs batted in1,121
Managerial record62–154
Winning %.287
Teams
As player

As manager

Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1953
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Career

Wallace was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He made his major league debut in 1894 as a starting pitcher with the Cleveland Spiders. After a 12–14 record in 1895, Wallace played outfield and pitcher in 1896. In 1897, Wallace was an everyday player as he became the team's full-time third baseman, batted .335 and drove in 112 runs.

In 1899, Wallace moved to the St. Louis Perfectos (renamed the Cardinals in 1900) and changed position to shortstop. He hit .295 with 108 RBI and 12 home runs (second in the league behind Buck Freeman's 25). Wallace changed teams again in 1902, when he joined the St. Louis Browns.

His playing time began decreasing a decade later, with his last season as a regular coming in 1912. Wallace played in just 55 games in 1913, and never played that much again for the rest of his career. In July 1917, he returned to the National League and the Cardinals, and played in just eight games that season. After batting .153 in 32 games in 1918, Wallace retired with a .268 career batting average, 1059 runs, 34 home runs, 1121 RBI and 201 stolen bases. He played his last game on September 2, 1918 at the age of 44 years and 312 days, making him the oldest shortstop to play in a regular-season game.[1] The record was broken by Omar Vizquel on May 7, 2012.

Wallace was generally recognized as the AL's best shortstop from 1902 to 1911, when he served briefly as Browns player-manager.

He played for 24 seasons, and holds the record for the longest career by a player who never played in a World Series.

When his playing time diminished, Wallace managed and umpired. He managed the St. Louis Browns in 1911 and 1912 and the Cincinnati Reds during part of the 1937 season. He compiled 62 wins and 154 losses for a .287 winning percentage as a major league manager. He also managed the minor league Wichita Witches in 1917. He umpired in the American League in 1915, working 111 games. Upon retiring, he also became a scout.

Wallace was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Omar Vizquel turns 45 with a chance to become the all-time elder statesman among shortstops". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 24 April 2012.

External links

1960 in the United States

Events from the year 1960 in the United States.

Bobby Wallace

Bob or Bobby Wallace may refer to:

Bobby Wallace (American football) (born 1954), college football coach at the University of North Alabama

Bobby Wallace (baseball) (1873–1960), Baseball Hall of Fame member

Bob Wallace (1949–2002), early Microsoft employee

Bob Wallace (footballer, born 1893) (1893–1970), Scottish footballer (Nottingham Forest)

Bob Wallace (footballer, born 1948), English footballer

Bob Wallace (American football) (born 1945), former American football wide receiver and tight end

Bob Wallace (test driver) (1938–2013), racing driver from New Zealand who was instrumental in the founding of automaker Lamborghini

Wallace (surname)

Wallace is a Scottish surname derived from the Anglo-Norman French waleis, which is in turn derived from a cognate of the Old English wylisc (pronounced "wullish") meaning "foreigner" or "Welshman" (see also Wallach and Walhaz). The original surname may have denoted someone from the former Kingdom of Strathclyde who spoke Cumbric, a close relative of the Welsh language, or possibly an incomer from Wales, or the Welsh Marches. The Kingdom of Strathclyde was originally a part of the Hen Ogledd, its people speaking a Brythonic language distinct from Scottish Gaelic and the English derived from Lothian. In modern times, in the 19th and 20th centuries, the surname has been used as an Americanization of numerous Ashkenazic Jewish surnames.

BBWAA Vote
Veterans Committee
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires
Inducted as a Cardinal
Inductees who played
for the Cardinals
Cardinals managers
Cardinals executives
Frick Award
Spink Award

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