Bobby Shantz

Robert Clayton Shantz (born September 26, 1925) is an American former professional baseball player. He played as a pitcher in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics (1949–1954), Kansas City Athletics (1955–1956), New York Yankees (1957–1960), Pittsburgh Pirates (1961), Houston Colt .45s (1962), St. Louis Cardinals (1962–1964), Chicago Cubs (1964), and Philadelphia Phillies (1964).[1]

A left-hander, Shantz began his career as a starting pitcher, but about halfway through he converted to a competent relief pitcher. In 1951, he added the knuckleball to his repertoire. Standing only 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m), Shantz had a career record of 119 games won, 99 games lost, and an earned run average (ERA) of 3.38.

Bobby Shantz
Bobby Shantz 1953
Shantz in 1953
Pitcher
Born: September 26, 1925 (age 93)
Pottstown, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
May 1, 1949, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1964, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record119–99
Earned run average3.38
Strikeouts1,072
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Shantz enjoyed his best season in 1952 when he led the American League in wins (24) and won the MVP Award.[1] In the process, he led the A's to a fourth-place finish. This was their last winning season in Philadelphia. The 1952 A's had some good players, including batting champion Ferris Fain, shortstop Eddie Joost, home run hitter Gus Zernial, and fleet center fielder Dave Philley. In a September 1952 game, Shantz's left wrist was broken after it was hit by a pitch thrown by Walt Masterson.[2] The following season, Shantz injured his shoulder in a game against the Boston Red Sox.[3] Shantz saw only limited action for the rest of 1953 and pitched only eight innings in 1954.[4] After the 1954 season was complete, the Athletics were sold and moved to Kansas City for the 1955 season.

A highly skilled fielder, Shantz won eight consecutive Gold Glove Awards from 1957 to 1964 (American League, 1957–60; National League, 1961–64; in 1957 the award was rendered for both leagues). Shantz also was selected for the All-Star Game in 1951, 1952 and 1957.[1] In the fifth and final inning of the 1952 All Star Game, the left–handed Shantz exhibited his distinctive sidearm delivery and sharp curve and control and struck out three consecutive National League hitters: Whitey Lockman, Jackie Robinson and Stan Musial.

Shantz appeared in relief three games each in the 1957 and 1960 World Series with the Casey Stengel managed New York Yankees.[1]

Shantz had the distinction of being selected in expansion drafts in consecutive seasons. He was selected in the 1960 MLB expansion draft by the Washington Senators from the New York Yankees, and in the 1961 MLB expansion draft by the Colt .45s from the Pittsburgh Pirates.

He is the brother of former Major League catcher Billy Shantz. He is the oldest living former player of the Houston Astros organization.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Bobby Shantz Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  2. ^ "Shantz Suffers Broken Wrist As A's Nip Nats". Meriden Record. Meriden-Wallingford, Connecticut. Associated Press (AP). September 24, 1952. p. 4. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  3. ^ "Bobby Shantz Is Sidelined With Injured Shoulder". Lodi News-Sentinel. Lodi: CA. United Press International (UP). May 22, 1953. p. 10. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  4. ^ Fraley, Oscar (May 19, 1955). "Bobby Shantz Apparently Has Made It All The Way Back". The Wilmington News. Wilmington, North Carolina. United Press International (UP). p. 17. Retrieved November 8, 2015.

External links

1952 Major League Baseball season

The 1952 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 15 to October 7, 1952. The Braves were playing their final season in Boston, before the team relocated to Milwaukee the following year, thus, ending fifty seasons without any MLB team relocating.

1952 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1952 Philadelphia Athletics season saw the A's finish fourth in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses. They finished 16 games behind the eventual World Series Champion New York Yankees. The Athletics' 1952 campaign would be their final winning season in Philadelphia; it would also be their only winning season of the 1950s. The Athletics would have to wait until 1968, their first season in Oakland, for their next winning record.

1957 New York Yankees season

The 1957 New York Yankees season was the 55th season for the team in New York, and its 57th season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56 to win their 23rd pennant, finishing eight games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

In the World Series, the Yankees were defeated by the Milwaukee Braves in seven games. They lost the crucial seventh game in Yankee Stadium to the starting pitcher for the Braves, Lew Burdette, who was selected the World Series Most Valuable Player based on this and his other two victories in the Series.

Phil Rizzuto, the former team shortstop from the early 50s, joined the broadcast team for the radio and television broadcasts taking over from Jim Woods in what would be the first of many seasons as a Yankees broadcaster.

1960 World Series

The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League (NL) and the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) from October 5 to 13, 1960. It is most notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, the only time a winner-take-all World Series game has ended with a walk-off home run.

Despite losing the series, the Yankees scored 55 runs, the most runs scored by any one team in World Series history, a unique record, and more than twice as many as the Pirates, who scored 27 runs. The Yankees won three blowout games (16–3, 10–0, and 12–0), while the Pirates won four close games (6–4, 3–2, 5–2, and 10–9) to win the series. The Series MVP was Bobby Richardson of the Yankees, the only time in history that the award has been given to a member of the losing team.

This World Series featured seven past, present, or future league Most Valuable Players. The Pirates had two – Dick Groat (1960) and Roberto Clemente (1966) – while the Yankees had five: Yogi Berra (1951, 1954, 1955), Bobby Shantz (1952), Mickey Mantle (1956, 1957, 1962), Roger Maris (1960, 1961), and Elston Howard (1963).

As noted in the superstition called the "Ex-Cub Factor", this was the only Series after 1945 and until 2001 in which a team with three or more former members of the Chicago Cubs (Don Hoak, Smoky Burgess, and Gene Baker) was able to win a World Series.

The World Championship for the Pirates was their third overall and first since 1925.

1962 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1962 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 81st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 71st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 84–78 during the season and finished 6th in the NL, 17½ games behind the San Francisco Giants. Also in 1962, the Cardinals became the first NL club to wear names on the backs of their uniforms that season.

1964 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1964 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 83rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 73rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93–69 during the season and finished first in the National League, edging the co-runners-up Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies by one game each on the last day of the regular-season to claim their first NL pennant since 1946. They went on to win the World Series in 7 games over the New York Yankees.

Art Ditmar

Arthur John Ditmar (born April 3, 1929) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Athletics (Philadelphia, 1954 - Kansas City, 1955–56, 1961–62) and the New York Yankees (1957–1961). He batted and threw right-handed and was listed at 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and 185 pounds (84 kg). Born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, he grew up in the Berkshire County city of Pittsfield, where he graduated from high school.A finesse control pitcher, Ditmar divided his career between the Athletics and Yankees. Ditmar won 47 games for the Yankees in a span of five years, with a career-high 15 in 1960, despite not getting to pitch on a regular basis in a rotation that included Whitey Ford, Bobby Shantz, Don Larsen and Bob Turley. In a nine-season career, Ditmar compiled a 72-77 record with 552 strikeouts and a 3.98 ERA in 1,268.0 innings.

Ditmar defeated the Yankees 8-6, when the Athletics played their last game at Shibe Park in Philadelphia before moving to Kansas City. In the same game, Yankees regular catcher Yogi Berra played his only game at third base in his career, and teammate Mickey Mantle appeared at shortstop (September 26, 1954). Ditmar started and lost both Game 1 and Game 5 of the 1960 World Series for the Yankees, lasting only one-third of an inning in Game 1 and 1 and one-third inning in Game 5.

After a Budweiser television commercial of the 1980s incorporated the original radio broadcast of the 1960 World Series Game 7, with announcer Chuck Thompson incorrectly naming Ditmar instead of Ralph Terry as the pitcher off whom Bill Mazeroski hit his legendary home run, Ditmar sued Anheuser-Busch for $500,000, contending his reputation was tarnished.

Art Mahaffey

Arthur Mahaffey Jr. (born June 4, 1938), is an American former professional baseball starting pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies (1960–1965) and St. Louis Cardinals (1966). He batted and threw right-handed. In a seven-season MLB career, Mahaffey posted a 59–64 record, with 639 strikeouts, and a 4.17 earned run average (ERA), in 999.0 innings pitched.Mahaffey was signed as an amateur free agent by the Philadelphia Phillies on June 29, 1956; he began his Minor League Baseball (MiLB) career, that Summer. After 4​1⁄2 seasons playing in the Phillies' farm system, he received his MLB call-up, playing in his first Phillies game on July 30, 1960; Mahaffey pitched the final two innings of a game against the St. Louis Cardinals. He retired the three batters he faced in the eighth inning. In the ninth, Bill White led off with a single to right field and then was picked off by Mahaffey at first base. The next batter, Curt Flood, singled to center field, and he, too, was picked off by Mahaffey, who threw to first with Flood tagged out on a throw from first to second. He finished the 1960 season with a 7–3 record, an ERA of 2.31, 14 games played, while finishing third in the 1960 National League (NL) Rookie of the Year balloting (which was won by Frank Howard of the Los Angeles Dodgers).Mahaffey set a club record with 17 strikeouts in a game against the Chicago Cubs on April 23, 1961. Though he ended the 1961 season with an ERA of 4.10, and a record of 11–19 (leading the NL in losses), in 36 games, he was selected to represent the Phillies on the NL All-Star team. Mahaffey ended the 1962 season with a record of 19–14, and a 3.94 ERA, with a career high 177 strikeouts, in 41 games. He was selected again in 1962 for the NL All-Star team, finishing 26th in balloting for NL Most Valuable Player (MVP), despite leading the league in home runs allowed with 36, and earned runs allowed with 120. Mahaffey had a 7–10 record in 26 games with the 1963 Phillies, to go along with a 3.99 ERA. In 1964, he finished the season with a record of 12–9, with an ERA of 4.52, in 34 games. The ill-fated 1964 team was in first place in the NL, with a 6​1⁄2-game lead, with just 12 games remaining in the season, before starting a 10-game losing streak that cost the team the pennant. Mahaffey pitched in two of the games in that infamous skid, losing a 1–0 game (the first of that losing streak) on a steal of home by Chico Ruiz of the Cincinnati Reds, and was taken out while winning 4-3 in a game against the Milwaukee Braves, in which Rico Carty hit a ninth-inning bases-loaded triple, plating all 3 runners, off of reliever Bobby Shantz, to win the game for the Braves, 6-4. 1965 was his last season in Philadelphia, which saw him finish with a 2–5 record, and an ERA of 6.21, in 22 games, mostly in relief.Mahaffey was traded by the Phillies on October 27, 1965, along with catcher Pat Corrales, and outfielder Alex Johnson, to the Cardinals, in exchange for shortstop Dick Groat, catcher Bob Uecker, and first baseman Bill White. In his only season with the Cards, he had a 1–4 record, in 12 games, with an ERA of 6.43. Mahaffey was the starting pitcher in his final big league game, on July 17, 1966, in the second game of a doubleheader against the Chicago Cubs; that day, he gave up three hits, and three runs, in ​1⁄3 of an inning, in a game the Cubs won by a score of 7–2.The Cardinals traded Mahaffey on April 1, 1967, along with infielder Jerry Buchek, and shortstop Tony Martínez, to the New York Mets, in exchange for shortstop Eddie Bressoud, outfielder Danny Napoleon, and cash (though Mahaffey would never play for the Mets).Mahaffey now resides in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Bennie Daniels

Bennie Daniels Jr. (born June 17, 1932), is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1957–1960) and Washington Senators (1961–1965). During his playing days, Daniels stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m), weighing 193 pounds (88 kg). He threw right-handed and batted left-handed. During his 9-year big league career, Daniels compiled 45 wins, 471 strikeouts, and a 4.44 earned run average (ERA).Born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Daniels began his career in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization, in 1951, with the Great Falls Electrics of the Pioneer League. After spending the 1953–1954 seasons in military service, he continued to move up, through Pittsburgh’s farm system. After a good 17–8 season with the Hollywood Stars of the Pacific Coast League, the Bucs called Daniels up, in September 1957.

Daniels enjoyed the distinction of starting the last game played in Ebbets Field by the Brooklyn Dodgers, on September 24, 1957. The Pirates were defeated by the Dodgers’ Danny McDevitt, 2–0.On May 23, 1960 at Forbes Field, Daniels single in the second inning against Sandy Koufax was the only hit the Pirates got against Koufax, who won 1-0, denying him of a no-hitter.

On December 16, 1960, Daniels was involved in one of the first trades made by the expansion Washington Senators. The 4-player deal sent pitcher Bobby Shantz to the Pirates for Daniels and two others, infielders Harry Bright and R. C. Stevens.

Brock for Broglio

The phrase "Brock for Broglio" is sometimes used in the sport of baseball to signify a trade that in hindsight, turns out to be an extremely lopsided transaction.The names in the phrase refer to Lou Brock and Ernie Broglio respectively, the centerpieces of a June 15, 1964, six-player deal: Brock, Jack Spring and Paul Toth were traded from the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals in exchange for Broglio, Bobby Shantz, and Doug Clemens.It was thought initially the Cubs had done better in the deal, as Broglio was coming off some impressive seasons while pitching for the Cardinals, while Brock had been considered a disappointment for the Cubs.Almost immediately the effects of the trade were felt, as Brock batted .348 for the Cardinals and led them to winning the 1964 World Series. Brock also helped the Cardinals to another World Series title in 1967, a pennant in 1968, and played successfully for St. Louis through 1979, amassing 3,023 hits and 938 stolen bases (at the time becoming baseball's all-time leader in stolen bases) en route to his Hall of Fame election in 1985. Meanwhile, Broglio went only 4-7 with a 4.04 ERA for the Cubs, and by 1966 was out of Major League Baseball. Broglio did not tell anyone at the time, but he was suffering from an injured elbow since the second half of the 1963 season, and in November 1964, had his ulnar nerve reset.This is sometimes referred to as the most lopsided trade in baseball history.The Emil Verban Society, an association of Cubs fans in the Washington, D.C. area, which includes national political leaders and journalists, occasionally recognizes bad decision-making with the "Brock-for-Broglio Judgment Award"—presented, for example, to Saddam Hussein for his invasion of Kuwait in 1990.

Jack McMahan

Jack Wally McMahan (born July 22, 1932 in Hot Springs, Arkansas) is a former right-handed batting, left-handed throwing Major League Baseball pitcher who played in 1956 for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Kansas City Athletics.

He attended University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Originally signed by the New York Yankees prior to the 1952 season, McMahon was drafted by the Pirates from the Yankees in the 1955 Rule 5 draft.

He made his big league debut on April 18, 1956. In eleven games with the Pirates, he posted a 6.08 ERA after allowing eighteen hits and nine earned runs in 13​1⁄3 innings of work. On June 23, he was traded by the Pirates with Curt Roberts to the Athletics for Spook Jacobs. Although he lowered his ERA with the Athletics to 4.82, he still went 0-5 in 23 games (nine starts) with them. In 61.2 innings, he walked 31 batters and struck out only 13. Between the two teams, he went 0-5 with a 5.04 ERA in 34 games (nine started). In exactly 75 innings of work, he allowed 87 hits and 40 walks. He had only 22 strikeouts. He was also an 0-fer as a batter as well - in 15 at bats, he collected zero hits (but he did strikeout 8 times). He played his final big league game on September 23.

Although he never appeared in the majors after 1956, he was still active in the minors, and he was involved in a big trade that took place between the Athletics and Yankees while in the minors. On February 19, 1957, the Athletics - with players to be named later, Wayne Belardi, Art Ditmar, and Bobby Shantz - sent McMahan to the Yankees for a player to be named later, Irv Noren, Milt Graff, Mickey McDermott, Tom Morgan, Rip Coleman, and Billy Hunter. The Yankees sent Jack Urban to the Athletics to complete the trade. The Athletics sent Curt Roberts and Clete Boyer to the Yankees to complete the trade.

Jack Urban

Jack Elmer Urban (December 5, 1928 – June 26, 2006) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played from 1957 to 1959 for the Kansas City Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals.

Originally signed by the New York Yankees before the 1949 season, Urban was sent to the Athletics in a trade involving 13 players. The Yankees sent Irv Noren, Milt Graff, Mickey McDermott, Tom Morgan, Rip Coleman, Billy Hunter and Urban (as a player to be named later) to the Athletics for Art Ditmar, Bobby Shantz, Jack McMahan, Wayne Belardi and two players to be named later, who would end up being Curt Roberts and Clete Boyer.

Although not much is known about his minor league career, it is known that in 1954, he tossed a no-hitter for the Birmingham Barons of the Southern League.

He made his big league debut on June 13, 1957 at the age of 28 and came into the league with a bang. Facing the Washington Senators, he tossed a complete, allowing only two runs and five hits. Although the team as a whole finished 59–94 on the year, Urban did exceptionally well compared to that, finishing with a 7–4 record and a 3.34 ERA in 129.1 innings of work. He allowed only 111 hits and 45 walks as well.

Experiencing a sophomore slump, his 1958 season was not so impressive, however. In 30 games – 24 of which were starts – he went 8–11 with a 5.93 ERA. In 132 innings of work, he allowed 150 hits and 51 walks.

He was traded back to the Yankees on April 8, 1959 for Mark Freeman. Urban never appeared in a Yankees uniform however, as he was purchased by the Cardinals in May of that year. Appearing in only eight games for the Cardinals, Urban allowed 18 hits, seven walks and 11 earned runs in 10​2⁄3 innings for a 9.28 ERA. He played his final game on August 6, 1959 against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Although he entered the league with a bang, he left with a disappointing game – in only 1/3 of an inning, he allowed a total of five runs.

Overall, in his three-year career Urban went 15–15 with a 4.83 ERA. In 272 innings, he allowed 279 hits, 103 walks, and he also had 113 strikeouts. A respectable hitter (for a pitcher), he hit .208 in 86 career at-bats.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at pitcher

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Greg Maddux has won the most Gold Glove Awards among all players, including pitchers, in Major League Baseball history. He won 18 awards, all in the National League; his streak of wins was consecutive from 1990 through 2002 until interrupted by Mike Hampton in 2003. Maddux won five more awards from 2004 to 2008, after which he retired. Jim Kaat is second and held the record for most wins (16) until he was displaced by Maddux in 2007. He won 14 awards in the American League and 2 in the National League; his 16 consecutive awards is a record among winners. Bob Gibson won nine Gold Gloves with the St. Louis Cardinals, and the inaugural winner Bobby Shantz won four awards in each league, for a total of eight. Mark Langston and Mike Mussina are tied for the fifth-highest total, with seven wins each. Five-time awardees include Ron Guidry, Phil Niekro, and Kenny Rogers; Jim Palmer won four times. Gold Glove winners at pitcher who have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame include Gibson, Palmer, and Niekro.Maddux made the most putouts in a season (39) three times in his career (1990, 1991, and 1993). The American League leader is Frank Lary, who made 32 putouts for the Detroit Tigers in 1961. Kaat is the leader in assists; he made 72 with the Minnesota Twins in 1962. The National League leader, Maddux, trails him by one (71 assists in 1996). Many pitchers have posted errorless seasons and 1.000 fielding percentages in their winning seasons; Mussina is the leader with four perfect seasons in the field. Guidry (1982–1984) and Mussina (1996–1998) both accomplished the feat in three consecutive seasons. The most double plays turned by a winning pitcher is nine, accomplished by Maddux in 2006. Four pitchers have also thrown no wild pitches in a winning season: Maddux (1997, 2006), Kaat (1975), Shantz (1961, 1962), and Rogers (2005). In contrast, the most wild pitches in a winning season is 18, by the knuckleballing Niekro. The fewest balks in a winning season is zero, achieved many times, but Maddux accomplished the feat the most time in his wins (12 balk-free seasons in 18 years). The most balks in a winning season is five, by Mike Norris in 1981 and Orel Hershiser in 1988. Langston picked off the most runners from the pitcher's mound in a winning season, with 10 in 1993; four pitchers are tied for the National League lead with 5 pickoffs. Rogers posted both the highest (100% in 2002) and lowest (0% in 2005) caught stealing percentage in a winning season. Shantz' 1961 season tied Rogers' 0% mark for lowest percentage caught, and three pitchers are tied for the National League lead (67% caught).

List of Houston Astros Opening Day starting pitchers

The Houston Astros are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Houston, Texas. They currently play in the American League West division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Houston Astros have used 21 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 49 seasons. The 20 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 20 wins, 21 losses and 9 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.The Astros began to play in 1962 as the Houston Colt .45s (their name was changed to the Astros in 1965 when the Houston Astrodome opened as their home ball park). Bobby Shantz started their first Opening Day game on April 10, 1962 against the Chicago Cubs at Houston's Colt Stadium and was credited with the win. In their first eight seasons, the Colt .45s / Astros used eight different Opening Day starters. In 1970, that streak ended when Larry Dierker made his second Opening Day start.Roy Oswalt has made the most Opening Day starts for the Astros, with eight such starts from 2003 through 2010. Three different pitchers have each made five Opening Day starts for the Astros: J. R. Richard (1976–1980), Mike Scott (1987–1991) and Shane Reynolds (1996–2000). Dierker made four Opening Day starts for the Astros, and Joe Niekro and Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan made three apiece. Dierker has the best record in Opening Day starts with four wins and no losses. Niekro and Don Wilson share the worst record in Opening Day starts with no wins and two losses each. Niekro also had one no decision.The Astros have played in three home ball parks. Their first home ball park was Colt Stadium. Their starting pitchers had one win and one loss in their two Opening Day games at Colt Stadium. They played 25 Opening Day games in the Astrodome after moving there in 1965, and their starting pitchers had a record of 12 wins, 8 losses and 5 no decisions in those games. In 2000, they moved to Enron Field (subsequently renamed Astros Field and Minute Maid Park) in Downtown Houston. Through 2010, they have played nine Opening Day games there, and their starting pitchers have a record of three wins, four losses and two no decisions in those games. This makes the record of the Astros' Opening Day starting pitchers in home games 16 wins, 13 losses and 7 no decisions. Their record in Opening Day away games is four wins, eight losses and two no decisions. The Astros have advanced to the World Series once, in 2005. Oswalt lost to the St. Louis Cardinals as the Opening Day starter that season.

List of Philadelphia and Kansas City Athletics Opening Day starting pitchers

The Athletics are a Major League Baseball team that was originally based in Philadelphia. They moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1956 before moving to their current home, Oakland, California in 1968. They have always played in the American League. During the 20th century until their move to Kansas City, they played their home games primarily at two home ball parks – Columbia Park until 1908, and Shibe Park (renamed Connie Mack Stadium in 1953) from 1909 through 1967. Their home ball park in Kansas City was Municipal Stadium. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.The Athletics played their first game on April 26, 1901 at Columbia Park. Chick Fraser was the Opening Day starter for that game, which the Athletics lost to the Washington Senators by a score of 5–1. The Athletics used 45 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 67 seasons to moving to Oakland. The Athletics won 32 of those games against 35 losses in those Opening Day starts.Lefty Grove and Alex Kellner had the most Opening Day starts for the Philadelphia and Kansas City Athletics with four. Grove made four Opening Day starts for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1925, 1927, 1928 and 1930. Kellner made two Opening Day starts for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1952 and 1953, and two Opening Day starts for the Kansas City Athletics in 1955 and 1956. Eddie Plank (1904, 1909, 1910), Chief Bender (1905, 1906, 1911), Jack Coombs (1907, 1912, 1913), Scott Perry (1919–1921) and Phil Marchildon (1942, 1947, 1948) each made three Opening Day starts for the Philadelphia and Kansas City Athletics. The other pitchers who made multiple Opening Day starts for the Philadelphia and Kansas City Athletics are Bullet Joe Bush, Sugar Cain, Chubby Dean, Lum Harris, Slim Harriss and Bobby Shantz. Catfish Hunter made one Opening Day start for the Kansas City Athletics, but later made three Opening Day starts for the Oakland Athletics, giving him a total of four for the franchise.In the ten years from 1904 through 1913 the Athletics used four different Opening Day starting pitchers. Plank, Bender and Coombs each made three Opening Day starts during that span. The other Opening Day start during that span was made by Nick Carter in 1908. Carter made that start despite never having pitched in Major League Baseball prior to 1908 and, as it turned out, 1908 was Carter's only year in the Major Leagues.When the Athletics moved to Kansas City in 1955, Alex Kellner was the Opening Day starting pitcher. The Athletics won the game by a score of 6–2 over the Detroit Tigers. Kellner was the Opening Day starter for the Athletics again in 1956. However, in the 12 seasons from 1956 through their last season in Kansas City, 1967, the Athletics used a different Opening Day starting pitcher every season.

The Philadelphia Athletics were the American League champions nine times—1902, 1905, 1910, 1911, 1913, 1914 and 1929 through 1931. They won the World Series five times, in 1910, 1911, 1913, 1929 and 1930 (no World Series was played in 1902). In the seasons in which the Athletics won the World Series, their Opening Day starting pitchers were Plank (1910), Bender (1911), Coombs (1913), Carroll Yerkes (1929) and Grove (1930). The Athletics lost their Opening Day game in 1910 and 1911, but won in 1913, 1929 and 1930. The Kansas City Athletics never won and American League or World Series championship.

Paul Toth

Paul Louis Toth (June 30, 1935 – March 20, 1999) was an American professional baseball player. A right-handed pitcher, he appeared in Major League Baseball from 1962 to 1964 for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. He was born in McRoberts, Kentucky, grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, and was listed at 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) and 175 pounds (79 kg).

Toth was part of the "Brock for Broglio" trade on June 15, 1964: he accompanied outfielder Lou Brock and left-handed relief pitcher Jack Spring in a trade to the Cardinals, in exchange for starting pitcher Ernie Broglio, left-handed relief pitcher Bobby Shantz and outfielder Doug Clemens. Brock went on to help lead the Cardinals to three National League championships and two World Series titles — including one in 1964 — while setting a new career record for stolen bases. Toth, who was pitching at Triple-A for the Cubs at the time of the trade, remained in the minor leagues for the rest of his career.The Brock trade returned Toth to his original organization. He began his professional career in the Cardinals' farm system in 1955, and made his major league debut with the Redbirds in 1962, pitching in six games, including one start, sandwiched around service with the Triple-A Atlanta Crackers. On September 1, 1962, he was traded to the Cubs for pitcher Harvey Branch, and made six more appearances for the Cubs, including four starts, before the 1962 campaign ended, with Toth winning four of five decisions and posting an earned run average of 4.62. Toth then spent the entire 1963 season on the Cub roster, appearing in 27 games played, 14 as a starter, and compiling a 3.10 ERA with two shutouts. Toth was ineffective in two May 1964 starts and was sent to the Salt Lake City Bees of the Pacific Coast League after only four total games in Chicago.

He remained in Triple-A for the rest of his active career, retiring after the 1967 baseball season. In 43 Major League games, Toth pitched 192 innings and gave up 177 hits and 54 bases on balls with 82 strikeouts. In retirement, he became a resident of Erie, Michigan. He died in Anaheim, California, of a heart attack during a family visit at the age of 63. Toth is buried at Riverside National Cemetery in Riverside, California.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Shantz

Shantz is a surname. Notable people named Shantz include:

Billy Shantz (1927–1993), American baseball player

Bobby Shantz (born 1925), American baseball pitcher

David Shantz (born 1986), Canadian hockey goaltender

Homer L. Shantz (1876–1958), American botanist

Jacob Yost Shantz (1822–1909), Canadian businessman

Jeff Shantz (born 1973), Canadian hockey player

Lorne Shantz (1920–1999), Canadian politician

Sarah Shantz-Smiley (born 1982), women's ice hockey coach

Stephanie Shantz (born 1982), Canadian writer

Susan Shantz (born 1957) Canadian sculptor

Viola Shelly Shantz (1895–1977), American zoologist

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