Bobby Rousseau

Joseph Jean-Paul Robert Rousseau (born July 26, 1940) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey right winger who played in the National Hockey League (NHL), most notably for the Montreal Canadiens. He won the Calder Memorial Trophy in 1962 as NHL rookie of the year.

Bobby Rousseau
Chex Bob Rousseau
Born July 26, 1940 (age 78)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 178 lb (81 kg; 12 st 10 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Minnesota North Stars
New York Rangers
National team  Canada
Playing career 1958–1975

Playing career

Early career

Rousseau started his career with the St. Jean Braves of the Quebec Junior Hockey League in 1955-56 where he led the league in scoring with 53 goals and 85 points in 44 games. The next season, Rousseau moved on with the Hull-Ottawa Canadiens. Rousseau helped the team reach the 1957 Memorial Cup finals where they would play against the Guelph Biltmore Mad Hatters. The Canadiens took their opponents to a game 7 where they lost 3-2.[1] This would not deter the Canadiens as they returned to the Memorial Cup again in 1957-58. Rousseau and his team won the Memorial Cup this time as they beat the Regina Pats in 6 games.[2]

Olympic medal record
Men's ice hockey
Representing  Canada
Silver medal – second place 1960 Squaw Valley Ice hockey

In 1960, Rousseau was loaned to the Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen, the team that would represent Team Canada, at the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley.[3] Canada would finish with a silver medal at the tournament, while the USA won gold and the Soviets took the bronze. Rousseau scored 5 goals, 4 of which came in a 19-1 victory over Japan, and 9 points in 7 games during Canada's Olympic run.[4]

NHL career

In 1960-61, Rousseau earned his first chance in the National Hockey League with the Montreal Canadiens. Rousseau played in 15 games earning 3 points with the Canadiens. His style of play earned him a full spot on the roster with the Canadiens next season. He scored 21 goals and had 45 points during his first full NHL season, and was awarded the Calder Memorial Trophy as top rookie in the NHL that year.[5] After winning the Calder, Rousseau had a less productive year as he scored 37 points only. In 1963-64, Rousseau scored 25 goals and had 56 points. Rousseau also had a 5-goal game against the Detroit Red Wings on February 1, 1964.[6] The Canadiens reached the Stanley Cup Finals in 1964-65 against the Chicago Black Hawks. The series would go to 7 games, where the Canadiens would emerge victorious, giving Rousseau his first Stanley Cup win. Rousseau was also invited to the 1965 All-Star Game. During the 1965-66 NHL season, Rousseau registered 78 points and tied with Stan Mikita for second overall in the scoring race.[7] His hard work earned him a spot on the NHL Second All-Star Team that season. Rousseau would help the Canadiens defend their Stanley Cup title as they beat the Detroit Red Wings in 6 games. The Canadiens would return to the Finals for a third straight time in 1966-67. However, Rousseau and his team could not accomplish the three-peat as they were beaten by the Toronto Maple Leafs in 6 games. This did not matter to the Canadiens and Rousseau, as they made the finals for the next 2 seasons, winning the Stanley Cup both times.

After 9 seasons, with the Canadiens, and following a 24-goal performance the previous season, Rousseau was traded to the Minnesota North Stars where he spent the 1970-71 season. After just one season with the North Stars, he was traded to the New York Rangers in exchange for right winger Bob Nevin. Rousseau helped the Rangers reach the Stanley Cup Finals in 1971-72. Rousseau had a total of 17 points during the Rangers' run as they lost the Stanley Cup in 6 games to the Boston Bruins. After playing 2 more seasons with the Rangers, Rousseau retired after playing 8 games in 1974-75.

Personal life

Rousseau is the brother of former NHL players Rollie and Guy Rousseau.

Awards and achievements

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1955–56 St. Jean Braves QJHL 44 53 32 85 25
1956–57 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens OHA-Jr. 28 7 15 22 18
1956–57 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EOHL 15 4 2 6 2
1956–57 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens M-Cup 8 7 4 11 8
1957–58 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens OHA-Jr. 27 24 27 51 64
1957–58 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EOHL 36 26 26 52 14
1957–58 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens M-Cup 13 7 17 24 6
1958–59 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EOHL 18 7 18 25 26 3 1 1 2 2
1958–59 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens M-Cup 9 2 6 8 19
1958–59 Rochester Americans AHL 2 0 0 0 0
1959–60 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EPHL 4 4 2 6 4
1959–60 Brockville Jr. Canadiens M-Cup 13 14 9 23 14
1960–61 Montreal Canadiens NHL 15 1 2 3 4
1960–61 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EPHL 38 34 26 60 18 14 12 7 19 10
1961–62 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 21 24 45 26 6 0 2 2 0
1962–63 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 19 18 37 15 5 0 1 1 2
1963–64 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 25 31 56 32 7 1 1 2 2
1964–65 Montreal Canadiens NHL 66 12 35 47 26 13 5 8 13 24
1965–66 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 30 48 78 20 10 4 4 8 6
1966–67 Montreal Canadiens NHL 68 19 44 63 58 10 1 7 8 4
1967–68 Montreal Canadiens NHL 74 19 46 65 47 13 2 4 6 8
1968–69 Montreal Canadiens NHL 76 30 40 70 59 14 3 2 5 8
1969–70 Montreal Canadiens NHL 72 24 34 58 30
1970–71 Minnesota North Stars NHL 63 4 20 24 12 12 2 6 8 0
1971–72 New York Rangers NHL 78 21 36 57 12 16 6 11 17 7
1972–73 New York Rangers NHL 78 8 37 45 14 10 2 3 5 4
1973–74 New York Rangers NHL 72 10 41 51 4 12 1 8 9 4
1974–75 New York Rangers NHL 8 2 2 4 0
NHL totals 942 245 458 703 359 128 27 57 84 69

International

Year Team Event   GP G A Pts PIM
1960 Canada Oly 7 5 4 9 2

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Memorial Cup: A History...1957". Taking Note with Gregg Drinnan. Retrieved 2011-08-11.
  2. ^ "The Memorial Cup: A History...1958". Taking Note with Gregg Drinnan. Retrieved 2011-08-11.
  3. ^ Hockey's Glory Days: The 1950s and '60s, Dan Diamond, p.147 Published in Canada by Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2003,ISBN 978-0-7407-3829-6
  4. ^ "Bobby Rousseau". Legends of Hockey. Retrieved 2011-08-11.
  5. ^ "Habs great Bobby Rousseau hosts 2nd annual Martlet Basketball Golf Tournament". McGill University Athletics. McGill University. 23 June 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  6. ^ "Five Goal Games in NHL History". Joe Pelletier. Retrieved 2011-08-11.
  7. ^ The Montreal Canadiens:100 Years of Glory, D'Arcy Jenish, p.184, Published in Canada by Doubleday, 2009, ISBN 978-0-385-66325-0

External links

Preceded by
Dave Keon
Winner of the Calder Memorial Trophy
1962
Succeeded by
Kent Douglas
1961–62 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1961–62 Montreal Canadiens season was the 53rd season in franchise history. The team placed first in the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens were eliminated in semi-finals by the Chicago Black Hawks 4 games to 2.

1962–63 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1962–63 Montreal Canadiens season was the 54th season in franchise history. The team placed third in the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens were eliminated in semi-finals by the Toronto Maple Leafs 4 games to 1.

1963–64 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1963–64 Montreal Canadiens season was the club's 55th season of play. The team placed first in the regular season, earning top seed in the playoffs, but lost to the Toronto Maple Leafs in the semi-finals.

1964–65 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1964–65 Montreal Canadiens season was the 56th season of play of the club. The Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for the first time in five seasons, and the 13th time in franchise history, by defeating the Chicago Black Hawks in the final.

1964–65 NHL season

The 1964–65 NHL season was the 48th season of the National Hockey League. Six teams each played 70 games. Jean Beliveau was the winner of the newly introduced Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player during the playoffs. The Montreal Canadiens won their first Stanley Cup since 1960 as they were victorious over the Chicago Black Hawks in a seven-game final series.

1965 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1965 Stanley Cup Finals was played between the Chicago Black Hawks and the Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens won the best-of-seven series four games to three to win the Stanley Cup.

1965–66 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1965–66 Montreal Canadiens season was the team's 57th season of play. The Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for the second consecutive season, and the 14th time in their history. Bobby Rousseau registered 78 points and tied with Stan Mikita for second in the overall 1965–66 NHL scoring race.

1965–66 NHL season

The 1965–66 NHL season was the 49th season of the National Hockey League. Six teams each played 70 games. The Montreal Canadiens won their second consecutive Stanley Cup as they defeated the Detroit Red Wings four games to two in the final series.

1966 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1966 Stanley Cup Finals was contested by the Detroit Red Wings and the defending champion Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens would win the best-of-seven series four games to two to win the Stanley Cup for the seventh time in eleven years.

1966–67 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1966–67 Montreal Canadiens season was the Canadiens' 58th season of play, and 50th in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Canadiens lost in the Stanley Cup final to the Toronto Maple Leafs in six games. This was the final season before the 1967 NHL Expansion.

1967–68 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1967–68 Montreal Canadiens season was the club's 59th season of play. The Canadiens won their 15th Stanley Cup in club history.

1968 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1968 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1967–68 season, and the culmination of the 1968 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the Montreal Canadiens and the St. Louis Blues. The Canadiens swept the best-of-seven series in four games. It was the first Stanley Cup Finals after the NHL expansion to twelve teams. Although the series was a sweep, it was a much more intense and close-fought series than anyone had expected, as each of the four games was decided by one goal.

1968–69 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1968–69 Montreal Canadiens season was the club's 60th season of play. The Canadiens would defeat the St. Louis Blues to win their 16th Stanley Cup championship in club history.

1969 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1969 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1968–69 season, and the culmination of the 1969 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the defending champion Montreal Canadiens and the St. Louis Blues, a rematch of the previous year's finals. As they did in the previous matchup, the Canadiens won the series in four games.

1971–72 NHL season

The 1971–72 NHL season was the 55th season of the National Hockey League. Fourteen teams each played 78 games. The Boston Bruins beat the New York Rangers four games to two for their second Stanley Cup in three seasons in the finals.

1972 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1972 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1971–72 season, and the culmination of the 1972 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the Boston Bruins and the New York Rangers. It was the Rangers first appearance in the finals since 1950. The Bruins were making their first appearance since their victory in the 1970 Finals. It was the second Boston-New York Final series, the other being the 1929 Finals. The Bruins won the best-of-seven series, four games to two.

This was only the second Stanley Cup Final contested by New York in which the Rangers hosted all of their home games. The first such Final, held in 1929, had lasted only two games. All other previous Finals contested by the Rangers had partly or entirely coincided with an annual circus formerly held at Madison Square Garden, compelling the Rangers to play Finals games at neutral sites and/or at the venues of their opponents.

Guy Rousseau

Joseph Lucien Guy Rousseau (December 21, 1934 – November 23, 2016) was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward. Rousseau mainly played in the minor leagues during his career, though he also played four games in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Canadiens. In 1967, he served as the Executive Director of the Canada Winter Games in Quebec City. Guy is the brother of Rollie and Bobby Rousseau.

Rollie Rousseau

Joseph Roland Andre Rousseau (born December 8, 1929 - October 13, 2010) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey defenceman who played two games in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Canadiens. Rollie is the brother of Guy and Bobby Rousseau.

Rousseau was born in Montreal, Quebec.

Rousseau (surname)

Rousseau is a French surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Arts

Eugene Rousseau (saxophonist) (born 1932), American saxophonist

Frederick Rousseau (born 1958), French musician

Henri Rousseau (1844–1910), French naive painter, also known as Douanier Rousseau

Jacques Rousseau (painter) (1630–1693), French trompe l'œil painter

Jean Rousseau (1644–1699), French musician and author

Jean-Baptiste Rousseau (1671–1741), French poet

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712–1778), Genevan author and philosopher

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (author-filmmaker), Belgian film director

Jeanne Rij-Rousseau (1870–1956), French painter and art theorist

Jean Simeon Rousseau de la Rottiere (1747–1820), French decorative painter

Nita Rousseau (1949–2003), French writer

Philippe Rousseau (1816–1887), French still life painter

Serge Rousseau (1930–2007), French film and television actor

Stéphane Rousseau, Canadian actor

Théodore Rousseau (1812–1867), French painterScience

Cecil C. Rousseau, American mathematician

Denis Rousseau, American scientist

Frederic Rousseau, Belgian molecular biologist

Judith Rousseau, French statisticianSports

Bobby Rousseau (born 1940), Canadian ice hockey player

Eugène Rousseau (chess player) (c.1810–1870), French chess player

Florian Rousseau (born 1974), French cyclist

Maurice Rousseau (born 1906), French Olympic gymnast

Michel Rousseau (1936–2016), French amateur track cyclist

Jacques Rousseau (athlete) (born 1951), French track and field athlete

Vincent Rousseau (born 1962), Belgian runner

Yves Rousseau, French aviatorPolitics and military

André Rousseau (1911–2002), Quebec politician and businessman

Jeannie de Clarens, née Rousseau (1919-2017), French resistance fighter and spy

Lovell Rousseau (1818–1869), American general

René Waldeck-Rousseau (1846–1904), French politician

Roger Rousseau (1921–1986), Canadian ambassadorOther fields

Domaine Armand Rousseau, wine producer in Burgundy, France

Samuel Rousseau (1763–1820), British scholarAs a given name

Rousseau Owen Crump (1843–1901), American politician and businessman

Rousseau H. Flower (1913–1988), American paleontologist

Victor Rousseau Emanuel (1879–1960), British writerFictionalDanielle Rousseau, character on the American TV show Lost

Alexandra Rousseau, her daughter

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