Bobby Clatterbuck

Robert Dean Clatterbuck (July 3, 1932 – November 7, 2004) was a National Football League and American Football League quarterback. He played for the New York Giants and the Los Angeles Chargers.

Bobby Clatterbuck
refer to caption
Clatterbuck on a 1955 Bowman football card
No. 12, 19
Position:Quarterback[1]
Personal information
Born:July 3, 1932
Columbia, Missouri
Died:November 7, 2004 (aged 72)
Hurricane, Utah
Career information
College:Houston, Angelo State
NFL Draft:1954 / Round: 27 / Pick: 316
Career history
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT:8-9
Yards:1,032
QB Rating:66.7
Player stats at NFL.com

Amateur career

Clatterbuck attended San Angelo High School. He went on to play for the local San Angelo College. In 1950, his one year there, Clatterbuck led the Rams to a conference championship[2] and a victory in the Oleander Bowl.[3] Afterwards, he played college football for Houston[4] for 3 years. He held most of the passing records when he left.[2] He was a member of the school's first bowl appearance, winning the 1952 Salad Bowl. While at Houston, Clatterbuck also played baseball as a pitcher, and participated in the 1953 College World Series for the Cougars.[5] In 2014, he was posthumously inducted into his high school athletic hall of fame.[2]

Professional career

After college, Clatterbuck was drafted into the NFL by the New York Giants. He beat out two All-Americans for the job to back up All-Pro quarterback Charlie Conerly.[6] He rarely saw playing time, starting just 2 games in 4 seasons with the team. He was a member of the 1956 championship team. In 1960, Clatterbuck joined the AFL, playing for the Chargers in their inaugural season. He started two games in relief of starter Jack Kemp.

Clatterbuck wore contact lenses while he played. During a game early in his career, the backup was required to enter game, where he realized he had forgotten his contacts and played out the half "throwing blind".[6]

References

  1. ^ Conerly, Frank (2003). Backseat Quarterback (illustrated, reprint ed.). University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 9781604735901.
  2. ^ a b c Martinez, Quinton (2014-05-12). "BOBCAT HALL OF FAME: QB was record setter". Standard-Times. Retrieved 2018-06-29.
  3. ^ "Shrimp Bowl". www.luckyshow.org. Retrieved 2018-06-29.
  4. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19541206&id=3XBQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=kg8EAAAAIBAJ&pg=7005,132012
  5. ^ "Houston Cougars baseball Media Guide" (PDF). Houston Cougars baseball. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  6. ^ a b "Robert Dean "Bob" Clatterbuck (1932-2004) - Find..." www.findagrave.com. Retrieved 2018-06-29.
1952 Houston Cougars football team

The 1952 Houston Cougars football team, also known as the Houston Cougars, Houston, or UH, represented the University of Houston in the 1952 college football season as a member of the NCAA. It was the 7th year of season play for Houston. The team was coached by fifth-year head coach Clyde Lee. The team played its games off-campus at Rice Stadium, which had been built in 1950. The Cougars finished the season ranked as #19 by the Coaches Poll. It was the first time Houston finished a season as a nationally ranked team. Another first for the program was a conference championship, as the Cougars earned a perfect 3–0 record in Missouri Valley Conference play.

Following the season, Houston defensive tackle J. D. Kimmel was voted as the program's first All-American. Kimmel had been drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the 1952 NFL Draft prior to the season's beginning, and would later be drafted into the Houston Cougars Hall of Honor in 1973. Four other Houston players were also taken in the 1952 NFL Draft.

1953 College World Series

The 1953 College World Series was the seventh NCAA-sanctioned baseball tournament that determined a national champion. The tournament was held as the conclusion of the 1953 NCAA baseball season and was played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, NE from June 11 to June 16. The tournament's champion was Michigan, coached by Ray Fisher. The Most Outstanding Player was J. L. Smith of Texas.

The tournament consisted of no preliminary round of play as teams were selected directly into the College World Series. From 1954 to the present, teams compete in the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament preliminary round(s), to determine the eight teams that will play in the College World Series.

Angelo State Rams football

The Angelo State Rams football team represents Angelo State University in NCAA Division II college football. The Rams compete in the South Division of the Lone Star Conference. Angelo State University has earned one national title and three conference titles since becoming a member of the Lone Star Conference. The team plays all home games at LeGrand Stadium at 1st Community Credit Union Field. Will Wagner is currently the head coach.

Arnold Galiffa

Arnold Anthony "Arnie" Galiffa (January 29, 1927 – September 5, 1978) was a quarterback for the National Football League and Canadian Football League. He won 11 varsity letters at West Point and served with distinction as an officer in the Korean War.

Clatterbuck

Clatterbuck is a surname. Notable people with the name include:

Bobby Clatterbuck (born 1932), American football quarterback

Nick Clatterbuck (fl. 1984), American juvenile convicted of murder

Ed Danowski

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McBride played 10 seasons in the NFL, leading the Giants in scoring in each of their first three seasons (1925–27), and the NFL in scoring in 1927. As a passer, McBride ended his career with 3,123 yards passing, 31 touchdown passes, and 57 interceptions. As a rusher McBride totalled 2,093 yards rushing, and 26 rushing touchdowns, while averaging 4.2 yards a carry.McBride maintained his connection with pro football after his career in the NFL serving as the player/coach of the Paterson Panthers (later of the American Association) in 1935 and as coach of the New York Yankees of the second American Football League and the New York Yankees of the third AFL in 1940-1941.

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