Bobby Bowden National Collegiate Coach of the Year Award

The Bobby Bowden National Collegiate Coach of the Year Award was a college football award given annually to the nation's best head coach. Established in 2009, Nick Saban was the award's first recipient. The trophy commemorates former Florida State Seminoles football coach Bobby Bowden.

Bobby Bowden National Collegiate Coach of the Year Award
Given forCollege football's top head coach who has excelled on the football field while demonstrating perseverance, attitude, integrity, and determination
CountryUnited States
Presented byOver the Mountain Touchdown club of Birmingham, Alabama
Alabama Sports Foundation
History
First award2009
Most recentGus Malzahn
Websitewww.otmtouchdown.com/bowden-award.php

Overview

The Bobby Bowden National Collegiate Coach of the Year Award (the Bowden Award) is presented by the Over the Mountain Touchdown Club of Birmingham, Alabama[1] and the Alabama Sports Foundation.[2] The Bowden Award commemorates Bobby Bowden in recognition of his legendary coaching career and as a national symbol of recognition for the college football coach who has excelled on the football field while demonstrating perseverance, attitude, integrity, and determination; attributes that Bowden has exemplified throughout his coaching career and life. The recipient is determined by voting members of the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. The Bobby Bowden Lifetime Achievement Award was added as a companion award in 2011 with Coach Bowden being its very first recipient. The Awards are presented in March following National Signing Day and prior to the commencement of spring training.

Coach of the Year Recipients

Nick Saban[3] was the inaugural winner of the Bowden Award. Saban led the University of Alabama football team[4] to the 2009 BCS National Championship[5] and AP National Championship,[6] making him the only coach to win a national championship with two different schools since 1950 and one of two coaches to win a Southeastern Conference[7] football championship at two different schools. Bowden presented the Bowden Award to Saban at a public ceremony on March 21, 2010 at the Cahaba Grand Conference Center[8] in Birmingham, Alabama.[9]

Season Name School
2009 Nick Saban Alabama
2010 Gene Chizik Auburn
2011 Nick Saban Alabama
2012 Nick Saban Alabama
2013 Gus Malzahn Auburn

Lifetime Achievement Award Recipients

Year Recipient
2011 Bobby Bowden
2012 Lee Corso
2013 Brent Musburger
2014 Vince Dooley

References

  1. ^ "Over the Mountain Touchdown Club : Home". Otmtouchdown.com. Archived from the original on 2013-04-19. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  2. ^ [1],
  3. ^ "Nick Saban Profile - ALABAMA CRIMSON TIDE - University of Alabama Official Athletic Site". Rolltide.com. Archived from the original on 2012-11-19. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  4. ^ "ALABAMA CRIMSON TIDE - University of Alabama Official Athletic Site". Rolltide.com. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  5. ^ "BCS: News, highlights and insights into the Bowl Championship Series". Bcsfootball.org. 2012-11-18. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  6. ^ "News from The Associated Press". Hosted.ap.org. 2009-09-17. Archived from the original on 2012-11-01. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  7. ^ "Official Site of the Southeastern Conference". Secsports.com. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  8. ^ "Cahaba Grand Conference Center". Cahabagrand.com. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  9. ^ "The Official Website for the City of Birmingham, Alabama". Informationbirmingham.com. 2010-05-06. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on September 3, 2009 and ended on December 12, 2009. The postseason concluded on January 7, 2010 with the BCS National Championship Game in Pasadena, California, where the Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the Texas Longhorns by the score of 37–21.

For the first time in the history of the Heisman Trophy, the annual award for the most outstanding player in college football, two previous Heisman winners played in the same season—2008 winner Sam Bradford of Oklahoma and 2007 winner Tim Tebow of Florida. For the first time since 1946, the top three vote-getters from the previous season all returned: Bradford, Colt McCoy of Texas, and Tebow, in that order.

2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on September 2, 2010 and ended on December 11, 2010. The postseason concluded on January 10, 2011 with the BCS National Championship Game at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona. The Auburn Tigers defeated the Oregon Ducks to complete an undefeated season and win their second national title in school history.

2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on September 1, 2011 and ended on December 10, 2011. The postseason concluded on January 9, 2012 with the BCS National Championship Game at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. The #2 Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the #1 LSU Tigers 21–0. For the first time since 2007, and for only the third time in the Bowl Championship Series era, no team from an automatic-qualifying BCS conference finished the season with an undefeated record.

2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on August 30, 2012 and ended on December 8, 2012. The postseason concluded on January 7, 2013 with the BCS National Championship Game, where Alabama repeated as national champions by defeating Notre Dame.

Although Ohio State finished the regular season as the only undefeated team from an automatic-qualifying ("Power 5") BCS conference, they were ineligible to play in the postseason due to sanctions imposed earlier in the year.

2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on August 29, 2013 and ended on December 14, 2013. The postseason concluded on January 6, 2014 with the final BCS National Championship Game, played at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.

The Florida State Seminoles beat the Auburn Tigers in the BCS National Championship Game to become the consensus national champion of the 2013 season. This was the final season in which the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was used to determine the national champion of the Football Bowl Subdivision; the BCS was replaced by the College Football Playoff system starting with the 2014 season.

2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on August 27, 2014 and ended on December 13, 2014. The postseason concluded on January 12, 2015 with the inaugural College Football Playoff National Championship game at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The 2014 season marked a major change to the postseason with the introduction of the College Football Playoff, a four-team knockout tournament to determine the national champion of Division I FBS. The College Football Playoff system replaced the Bowl Championship Series, which had been in use since 1998.

Ohio State beat Oregon to claim the first ever FBS (formerly Division I-A) national title awarded using a playoff system. Following the game, Ohio State was named the #1 team in the AP Poll and Coaches' Poll for the season, making the Buckeyes consensus national champions among the major polls.

2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The regular season began on September 3, 2015 and ended on December 12, 2015. The postseason concluded on January 11, 2016 with Alabama defeating Clemson in the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship. This was the second season of the College Football Playoff (CFP) championship system.

Bill Snyder

Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939) is a retired college football coach and former player. He served as the head football coach at Kansas State University from 1989 to 2005, and again from 2009 to 2018. Snyder initially retired from the position from 2006 to 2008, before being rehired. Snyder retired for the second time on December 2, 2018, and is serving as a special ambassador for the athletics department.

Snyder was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2015, and won several conference and national coach of the year awards. He was the head coach at Kansas State for the program's 300th, 400th, and 500th all-time wins. In recognition of his contributions to the program, the football stadium at Kansas State, Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium, is named in honor of him and his family.

Bobby Bowden

Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929) is a retired American football coach. Bowden is best known for coaching the Florida State Seminoles football team from the 1976 to 2009 seasons.

During his time at Florida State, Bowden led FSU to an Associated Press and Coaches Poll National Title in 1993 and a BCS National Championship in 1999, as well as twelve Atlantic Coast Conference championships since FSU joined the conference in 1991. After a difficult 2009 season and amid questioning fans, Bowden stepped down, just weeks after his 80th birthday. He was allowed to make his final coaching appearance in the 2010 Gator Bowl game on January 1, 2010, with a 33–21 victory over his former program, West Virginia.

On March 6, 2009, NCAA ruling required Florida State to "vacate wins for any games in which an ineligible player participated", threatening to remove as many as fourteen of Bowden's wins from the 2006 and 2007 seasons in relation to an academic scandal. Florida State appealed the ruling, but the NCAA upheld it on January 5, 2010. Upon final investigation by Florida State University it was determined that Bowden was to vacate 12 wins, bringing his final career record to 377–129–4.

Florida State Seminoles football

The Florida State Seminoles football team represents Florida State University (variously Florida State or FSU) in the sport of American football. The Seminoles compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The team is known for its storied history, distinctive helmet, fight song and colors as well as the many traditions associated with the school.

Florida State has won three national championships, eighteen conference titles and six division titles along with a playoff appearance. The Seminoles have achieved three undefeated seasons, finished ranked in the top four of the AP Poll for 14 straight years from 1987 through 2000 and completed 41 straight winning seasons from 1977 through 2017. The 1999 team received votes from ESPN as one of the top teams in college football history.The team has produced three Heisman Trophy winners: quarterbacks Charlie Ward in 1993, Chris Weinke in 2000 and Jameis Winston in 2013. The Biletnikoff Award, presented annually to the top receiver in college football, is named for Florida State hall of famer Fred Biletnikoff. Other awards won by Florida State players include the Walter Camp Award, the Maxwell Award, the Davey O'Brien Award, the Lombardi Award, the Dick Butkus Award, the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, the Lou Groza Award, the Dave Rimington Trophy and the Bobby Bowden Award. Florida State coaches have been honored with the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award, the Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award, the Home Depot Coach of the Year Award, the Broyles Award, and the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award. Many former Seminoles have gone on to have successful careers in the NFL.

The program has produced 219 All-Americans (45 consensus and 15 unanimous) and 250 professional players. Florida State has had six members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, two members inducted into the College Football Coaches Hall of Fame and four members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The Seminoles have the tenth-highest winning percentage among all college football programs in Division I FBS history with over 500 victories. Florida State has appeared in forty-eight postseason bowl games and rank ninth nationally for bowl winning percentage and fourth for bowl wins. The Seminoles' archrivals are Florida, whom they meet annually in the last game of the regular season, and Miami; both games are considered among the greatest rivalries in college football. A rivalry with Clemson has developed and grown due to both teams competing yearly for the ACC Atlantic division.

The team is coached by Willie Taggart and plays its home games at Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium, currently the 18th largest stadium in college football and the 2nd largest in the ACC, located on-campus in Tallahassee, Florida.

Gene Chizik

Eugene T. Chizik (born December 28, 1961) is a former American football coach and former player. He was most recently the defensive coordinator at North Carolina from 2015–2016. He served as the head coach of the Auburn football team from 2009 until the end of the 2012 season. Chizik's 2010 Auburn Tigers football team completed a 14–0 season with a victory over Oregon in the BCS National Championship Game. Chizik played college football at the University of Florida in 1981 for head coach Charley Pell.

List of Auburn Tigers head football coaches

The Auburn Tigers college football team represents Auburn University the most prolific team in the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Tigers compete as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 25 head coaches, and 1 interim head coach, since it began play during the 1892 season. Since December 2012, Gus Malzahn has served as Auburn's head football coach.The team has played more than 1,150 games over 119 seasons. In that time, six coaches have led the Tigers in postseason bowl games: Jack Meagher, Ralph Jordan, Pat Dye, Terry Bowden, Tommy Tuberville and Gene Chizik. Seven coaches won conference championships: Walter H. Watkins and Mike Donahue won a combined three as a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association; Chet A. Wynne won one as a member of the Southern Conference; and Jordan, Dye, Tuberville and Chizik won a combined seven as a member of the SEC. During their tenures, Jordan and Chizik each won a national championship with the Tigers.Jordan is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 176 victories during his 25 years with the program. Chizik has the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .815. M. S. Harvey and Johnny Floyd have the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .000. Of the 26 different head coaches who have led the Tigers, John Heisman, Donahue, Jordan and Dye have been inducted as head coaches into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.

List of awards named after people

This is a list of prizes that are named after people.

For other lists of eponyms (names derived from people) see Lists of etymologies.

Bobby Bowden Coach of the Year Award winners
Overall trophies
Overall media awards
Positional awards
Other national player awards
All-Americans
Head coaching awards
Assistant coaching awards
Conference awards
Division I FCS awards
Other divisions/associations
Academic, inspirational,
and versatility awards
Service awards
Regional awards
Awards organizations
Halls of fame

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