Bobby Bell

Bobby Lee Bell Sr (born June 17, 1940) is a former professional American football linebacker and defensive end. He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, and was a member of the Chiefs' team that won Super Bowl IV against the Minnesota Vikings.

Bobby Bell
Bobby Bell
No. 78
Position:Linebacker / defensive end
Personal information
Born:June 17, 1940 (age 78)
Shelby, North Carolina
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:228 lb (103 kg)
Career information
High school:Shelby (NC) Cleveland
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1963 / Round: 2 / Pick: 16
AFL draft:1963 / Round: 7 / Pick: 56
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:26
Touchdowns:8
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Bobby excelled in several sports at a then-segregated Cleveland High School in Shelby, North Carolina. In the first two years, he played six-man football, playing under the position halfback. During his junior year, his school converted to playing with an eleven-man team where Bell served as quarterback. He won All-State honors.

College career

At the University of Minnesota, Bell was switched to the defensive line. He was a two-time All-American (1961 and 1962) and the winner of the 1962 Outland Trophy, which is given to the nation's most outstanding interior lineman. He also finished third in Heisman Trophy voting. The Gophers with Bell were the 1960 National Champions, played in the 1961 Rose Bowl, and won the 1962 Rose Bowl. Bell was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

He joined Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, via the Mu Chapter, while at the University of Minnesota. At the age of 74, he completed his college degree at Minnesota by finishing the three remaining courses he required. He graduated on May 14, 2015, some 50 years after leaving college to play professional football.

[1]

Professional football career

He played for the Kansas City Chiefs, first in the American Football League from 1963 through 1969, and then in the NFL from 1970 through 1974. Bell was an AFL All-Star for six consecutive years, 1964 through 1969, and then an NFL Pro Bowler for three straight years (1970-1972).

He was on two AFL Championship teams and a World Championship team. He was named to the All-Time All-AFL Team in 1970. He was inducted into the Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1980, and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983. The Chiefs retired his uniform number 78. In 1999, he was ranked number 66 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.

One of Bell's finest moments came in the 1969 AFL divisional playoff game against the New York Jets. In a critical goal line stand, his key coverage on Jets running back Matt Snell stopped the drive and forced New York to kick a field goal. The 13-6 victory over the Jets propelled Kansas City to its only Super Bowl triumph. During a regular season game against Denver (11/27), the Broncos, trailing 24–17 late in the game, attempted an onside kick that was recovered by Bell, who promptly returned that kick for a 53-yard touchdown.[2]

Bell was noted for his one-of-a-kind athleticism at 6' 4" and 230 pounds and was reported to have run a 4.5 40-yard dash. Bell was possibly the most physically gifted linebacker in professional football history, for his speed at such a size made him ideal at outside linebacker. He was noted as one of the finest open-field tacklers in Professional Football history, and if he missed, he had the speed to make up for it.

He was also a great blitzer from the linebacker position. Chiefs records show Bell had 40 career quarterback sacks and he might have had more if he had played right linebacker, not the left linebacker. In that era, more often than not the right-side linebacker got the call to "dog" or blitz since more often than not the tight end would be lined up on the right side (the defense's left). Since Bell was on the left, he usually covered more than he blitzed. He scored 9 touchdowns in his career: 6 off interceptions (tied for most in NFL history for a linebacker with Derrick Brooks),[3] 2 more touchdowns off fumble recoveries, and one off an onside kickoff return. Coach Hank Stram said that, "He could play all 22 positions on the field, and play them well." In addition to all that, he was regarded as one of the greatest long snapper centers for field goals and points-after-touchdowns in NCAA and AFL/NFL history.

After football

After his retirement, he opened Bobby Bell's Bar-b-que in Kansas City.

On August 22, 2016, The Tournament of Roses announced Bobby Bell, Ricky Ervins, Tommy Prothro, and Art Spander would be inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame as the Class of 2016. The Rose Bowl Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony then took place on January 1, 2017, outside the Rose Bowl Stadium, one day before the kickoff of the 103rd Rose Bowl Game on Monday January 2, 2017.

See also

References

  1. ^ Bell, Bobby. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/20/sports/football/bobby-lee-bell-an-nfl-star-honors-his-father-by-accomplishing-one-more-goal.html/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ Chiefs History: 1960's Archived January 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine KCChiefs.com, retrieved January 1, 2007.
  3. ^ Mayer, Larry (July 26, 2013). "Briggs adjusting to new role as defensive play-caller". Chicago Bears. Retrieved July 26, 2013.

External links

1961 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1961 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1961 Big Ten Conference football season. In their eighth year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers were 7–2 in the regular season and won the Rose Bowl, 21–3 over UCLA; Minnesota outscored their opponents 161–78. The Golden Gophers finished sixth in both final polls (Associated Press (AP) writers poll and United Press International (UPI) coaches poll), released in early December, prior to the bowl games.Quarterback Sandy Stephens received the team's most valuable player award, was a consensus first-team All-American, finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy voting, was named Rose Bowl MVP, and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, given to the Big Ten's most valuable player. Tackle Bobby Bell was also named a first-team All-American by the FWAA, AFCA, Sporting News, and Central Press. Fullback Judge Dickson and offensive lineman Jim Wheeler were named Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance at six home games was 366,491, an average of 61,081, and the season high was against Purdue on November 18.Days after the conclusion of the regular season, the faculty council at Ohio State University voted down participation in the Rose Bowl, and the berth went to Minnesota.

1962 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1962 Big Ten Conference football season was the 67th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1962 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1962 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Milt Bruhn, compiled an 8–2 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.2 points per game), and was ranked No. 2 in the final AP Poll. After losing only one game in the regular season, the Badgers lost to USC in the 1963 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Ron Vander Kelen led the Big Ten with 1,582 passing yards and 1,839 total yards and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the conference's most valuable player. End Pat Richter led the conference with 694 receiving yards and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Murray Warmath, compiled a 6–2–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), finished in second place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Tackle Bobby Bell was a consensus first-team All-American, won the Outland Trophy as college football's best interior lineman, and finished third in the voting for the 1962 Heisman Trophy.

The 1962 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Ara Parseghian, compiled a 7–2 record and finished in third place in the conference. The Wildcats were ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll before losing consecutive games late in the season. They remained ranked No. 16 in the final Coaches' Poll. Quarterback Tom Myers totaled 1,537 passing yards, and center Jack Cvercko was a consensus first-team All-American.

The conference's other statistical leaders included Michigan State fullback George Saimes with 642 rushing yards and Wisconsin's Lou Holland with 72 points scored.

1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season. In their ninth year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2–1 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 131 to 61. The team finished tenth in both the Associated Press and United Press International polls.

Tackle Bobby Bell received the team's Most Valuable Player award and the Outland Trophy. Bell, guard Julian Hook and end John Campbell were named All-Big Ten first team. Tackle Carl Eller and defensive end Bob Prawdzik were named All-Big Ten second team.Total attendance at six home games was 377,744, an average of 62,957 per game. The largest crowd was against Purdue.

1969 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1969 Kansas City Chiefs season was the team's 10th, their 7th in Kansas City, and also their final season in the American Football League. It resulted in an 11–3 record and a 23–7 victory in Super Bowl IV over the NFL's heavily favored Minnesota Vikings. The team beat their rivals, the Oakland Raiders in the final AFL Championship Game, claiming their third AFL Championship in franchise history. The Chiefs were coached by Hank Stram, led by quarterback Len Dawson and a powerful defense led by Bobby Bell, Willie Lanier, Buck Buchanan, Emmitt Thomas, Johnny Robinson and Curley Culp. The Chiefs' defense became the fourth defense in the history of pro football to lead its league in fewest rushing yards, fewest passing yards and fewest total yards. The Chiefs were the second AFL team to win the Super Bowl and last AFL team to do so before the AFL-NFL Merger in the following season.

The season was marred not only by an injury to quarterback Len Dawson but also controversy surrounding Dawson and his purported involvement in a sports gambling ring. Back-up quarterback Mike Livingston and the Chiefs' stellar defense led the Chiefs back to the Super Bowl, this time, to win it all.

Along with owner Lamar Hunt, nine future Hall of Famers were members of the 1969 Chiefs, including QB Len Dawson, LBs Willie Lanier and Bobby Bell, DT Buck Buchanan, DT Curley Culp, CB Emmitt Thomas, S Johnny Robinson, K Jan Stenerud, and Coach Hank Stram.

In 2006, the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs were ranked as the 18th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1969 Chiefs as the seventh-greatest defense in NFL history, noting "Hank Stram's 'Triple Stack' defense, which gave the linebackers lots of room to roam, was superb, holding five opponents to fewer than 10 points and giving up an average of less than two touchdowns a game.... Then they got serious. Against the [defending] Super Bowl champion Jets in the AFL divisional playoff game at Shea Stadium, the Chiefs held on for a 13–6 victory, thanks to a remarkable three-play goal line stand that stifled the Jets on the one. After losing twice to the Raiders during the regular season, the Chiefs allowed a single touchdown, in the first quarter, to win the AFL title over Oakland 17–7. The Chiefs defense then stifled the Vikings in the Super Bowl, allowing only two rushing first downs and picking off three passes in the fourth quarter to win 23–7. Total points against the Chiefs in the playoffs: 20." Kansas City is the only team in the Super Bowl era to win the title without allowing as much as 10 points in any postseason game.

1974 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1974 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League, the 12th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 15th overall, it ended with a 5–9 record and the Chiefs missed the playoffs for the 3rd straight year and third-place finish in the AFC West, Hank Stram was fired after the season and was replaced by Paul Wiggin in 1975.

While the club's sparkling new facility at Arrowhead Stadium was drawing rave reviews, the Chiefs roster was beginning to show its age. The result was the team's first losing season in 11 years as the club was unable to string together consecutive victories during the year, a first in franchise history. Many of the club's key players were entering the twilight of their careers: Len Dawson was 39, Jim Tyrer was 35, Bobby Bell, Buck Buchanan, and Ed Budde were 34, Dave Hill was 33 and Otis Taylor was 32.One of the year's few bright spots in the 5–9 season was cornerback Emmitt Thomas, who led the league with a franchise-record 12 interceptions. The final game of the 1974 campaign marked the final time all seven of Kansas City's Pro Football Hall of Fame players from the club's AFL champion era took the field together with coach Hank Stram. Including owner Lamar Hunt and seven future Minnesota Vikings Hall of Famers, an amazing total of 16 Hall of Fame inductees were involved in that 1974 season finale game. That 35–15 loss against Minnesota provided an anticlimactic conclusion to Hank Stram's illustrious coaching career in Kansas City. Three days later, Stram, the only head coach in franchise history was relieved of his duties on December 27 after compiling a 124–76–10 regular season record with the club.

1984 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1984 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1984 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first year under head coach Lou Holtz, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–7 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 316 to 194.Quarterback Rickey Foggie received the team's Most Valuable Player award. Linebacker Peter Najarian, punter Adam Kelly and offensive tackle Mark VonderHaar were named All-Big Ten second team. Linebacker Peter Najarian, defensive lineman Craig Paulson and running back David Puk were named Academic All-Big Ten.Mark VondeHaar was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Peter Najarian was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Strong safety Larry Joyner was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Center John Kelly was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Flanker Dwayne McMullen was awarded the Paul Giel Award. Total attendance for the season was 310,745, which averaged out to 51,791 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1985 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1985 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1985 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second and final year under head coach Lou Holtz, the Golden Gophers compiled a 7–5 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 293 to 240.When former Minnesota head coach Lou Holtz left the Golden Gophers to coach at the University of Notre Dame, assistant John Gutekunst was tapped to coach the Golden Gophers in the Independence Bowl. Attendance was 42,845.Quarterback Rickey Foggie was named offensive player of the game, while linebacker Bruce Holmes was named defensive player of the game.

Center Ray Hitchcock, linebacker Peter Najarian, offensive guard Jon Lilleberg and strong safety Larry Joyner were named All-Big Ten second team. Running back David Puk was named Academic All-American second team. Puk and linebacker Peter Najarian were named Academic All-Big Ten.Quarterback Rickey Foggie was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Trophy. Ray Hitchcock was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Peter Najarian was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Kicker Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Flanker . Andy Hare was awarded the Butch Nash Award. David Puk was awarded the Paul Giel Award.The total attendance was 426,918, which averaged out to 60,985 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Wisconsin.

1986 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1986 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first full year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–6 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 316 to 261. The team went to a second straight bowl game for the second time in school history (the first being the 1961 and 1962 Rose Bowls).Freshman tailback Darrell Thompson was named the Big Ten's freshman of the year. Thompson and kicker Chip Lohmiller were named All-Big Ten first team. Center Ray Hitchcock, Safety Larry Joyner and offensive linemen Jim Hobbins and Troy Wolkow were named All-Big Ten second team. Offensive lineman Paul Anderson, punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Jim Hobbins were named Academic All-Big Ten.Darrell Thompson was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Bruce Smith Award. Linebacker Mark Dusbabek was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Offensive tackle Anthony Burke was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Offensive tackle Norries Wilson was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 335,150, which averaged out to 55,858 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1987 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1987 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–5 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 262 to 257.Offensive guard Troy Wilkow was named All-Big Ten first team. Offensive lineman Paul Anderson, quarterback Rickey Foggie, tailback Darrell Thompson, kicker Chip Lohmiller and linebacker Jon Leverenz were named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Dan Liimatta were named Academic All-Big Ten.Foggie was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Darrell Thompson was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Jon Leverenz was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Brian Bonner was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Offensive tackle Dan Rechtin was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 371,809, which averaged out to 55,116 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Wisconsin.

1988 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1988 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–7–2 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 246 to 195. The tie against Illinois was the last tie for the Golden Gophers and under current NCAA rules, it will be the last in Golden Gophers history.

Punter Brent Herbel was named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Brent Liimatta were named Academic All-Big Ten.Wide receiver Chris Gaiters was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and the Bruce Smith Award. Gaiters was selected as a 3rd team All-American. Strong safety Joel Brown was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Brent Herbel was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Defensive tackle Ross Ukkelberg was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Center Pat Hart was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 312,596, which averaged out to 44,657 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1990 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1990 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–5 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 281 to 224.Center Chris Thome was named All-Big Ten first team. Offensive tackle Mike Sunvold and defensive back Sean Lumpkin were named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel was named Academic All-American. Quarterback Scott Schaffner and linebacker Joel Staats were named Academic All-Big Ten.Mike Sunvold was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Quarterback Marquel Fleetwood was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Cornerback Kenneth Sebree was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Cornerback Frank Jackson was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Jim King was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 243,511, which averaged out to 40,585 per game. The season high for attendance was against the Iowa.

1991 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1991 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–9 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 302 to 104.Offensive linemen Chip Brixius, defensive back Chris Cohen, wide receiver Omar Douglas, linebacker Dan LiSanti, running back Ken McClintock, defensive back Jeff Rosga and linebacker Lance Wolkow were named Academic All-Big Ten.Defensive back Sean Lumpkin was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Tight end Patt Evans was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Ken McClintock was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Joel Staats was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Quarterback Scott Schaffner was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 218,219, which averaged out to 36,369 per game. The season high for attendance was against the San José State.

1992 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1992 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–9 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 313 to 200.Offensive lineman Keith Ballard, defensive lineman Dennis Cappella and punter Dean Kaufman were named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius, wide receiver Omar Douglas, defensive lineman Shawn Ehrich, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, linebacker Peter Hiestand, defensive back Dan LiSanti, defensive back Jeff Rosga and linebacker Lance Wolkow were named Academic All-Big Ten.Keith Ballard was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Running back Antonio Carter was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Dennis Cappella was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Wide receiver Jon Lewis was winner of the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Russ Heath was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Ken McClintock was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 227,446, which averaged out to 37,908 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1994 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1994 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 348 to 256.Defensive tackle Ed Hawthorne and linebacker Broderick Hall were named All-Big Ten first team. Kicker Mike Chalberg was named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius was named first team Academic All-American. Kicker Mike Chalberg, defensive back Justin Conzemius, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, offensive lineman Luke Glime, linebacker Luke Hiestand, offensive lineman Todd Jesewitz, linebacker Ben Langford, wide receiver Tony Levine, defensive back Dan LiSanti, linebacker Craig Sauer, quarterback Cory Sauter and linebacker Chris Smith were named Academic All-Big Ten.Chris Darkins was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Bruce Smith Award. Craig Sauer was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Free safety Rishon Early was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Justin Conzemius was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Ed Hawthorne was awarded the Paul Giel Award.The total attendance for the season was 253,851, which averaged to 42,308 per game. The season attendance high was against Iowa, with 53,340 in attendance.

1995 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1995 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 368 to 272.Offensive guard Todd Jesewitz and linebacker Broderick Hall (American football) were named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius was named Academic All-American second team. Kicker Mike Chalberg, defensive back Justin Conzemius, defensive tackle Troy Duerr, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, linebacker Peter Hiestand, offensive lineman Todd Jesewitz, quarterback Rob Jones, wide receiver Tony Levine, defensive tackle Antoine Richard, linebacker Craig Sauer, quarterback Cory Sauter, linebacker Jim Tallman, defensive end Dave Watson, linebacker Parc Williams and long snapper Scott Williams were named Academic All-Big Ten.Craig Sauer was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Cory Sauter was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Mike Chalberg was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Justin Conzemius was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Chris Darkins was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total home attendance for the season was 291,173, which averaged out to 48,529 per game. The season high for attendance was against Wisconsin.

1996 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1996 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1996 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–7 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 340 to 236.Linebacker Luke Braaten, offensive tackle James Elizondo, offensive guard Pat Hau, quarterback Rob Jones, long snapper Derek Rackley, cornerback Fred Rodgers, quarterback Cory Sauter, linebacker Jim Tallman, linebacker Parc Williams and quarterback Spergon Wynn were named Academic All-Big Ten.Wide receiver Ryan Thelwell and offensive tackle Gann Brooks were awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Wide receiver Tutu Atwell was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Parc Williams was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Free safety Rishon Early was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Cory Sauter was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Defensive tackle Jerome Davis was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 261,113, which averaged out to 43,519 per game. The season high for attendance was again rival Iowa.

Bobby Bell (English footballer)

Robert Charles Bell (born 26 October 1950) is an English former professional footballer.

Bell, a central defender, began his career as an apprentice with Tottenham Hotspur before playing for Ipswich Town, Blackburn Rovers, Crystal Palace, Norwich City, Hellenic (South Africa), York City and Fort Lauderdale Strikers.His loan spell with Norwich came during the 1971-72 season when the team won the second division championship. He made three appearances for the club, and was the club's first ever loan player.

Bobby Bell (Scottish footballer)

Robert McDicker Bell (16 September 1934 – March 2007) was a Scottish footballer who played as a right back. He played in the Scottish football league system for Falkirk and Ayr United, before spending the majority of his playing career at English Football League club Watford. He later moved into English amateur football, first as a player, and later as a coach and manager.

Bobby Bell—awards, championships, and honors

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