Bobb McKittrick

Bobb McKittrick (December 29, 1935 – March 15, 2000) was an American football offensive line coach in the National Football League who coached in five Super Bowls.

Playing career

Born in Baker City, Oregon (then known as Baker), McKittrick attended Oregon State University, and was a member of the Acacia Fraternity. He played college football for the Oregon State Beavers, helping them to a Pacific Coast Conference championship in 1956, playing in the 1957 Rose Bowl.[1] Following graduation from Oregon State, he served as an officer in the United States Marines Corps for three years.[2]

Coaching career

From 1961 to 1964, McKittrick was a linebacker and tight end coach at Oregon State, helping the team reach the 1962 Liberty Bowl and the 1965 Rose Bowl. He followed Beaver head coach Tommy Prothro in 1965 to UCLA, where he coached in his second straight Rose Bowl with the Bruins in 1966. From 1971 to 1972, he was the offensive line coach of the NFL's Los Angeles Rams. From 1974 to 1978, he was an offensive line coach with the San Diego Chargers.[1][2] In 1976, he coached the offensive line under Bill Walsh, who was the Chargers' offensive coordinator for that single season.

From 1979 to 1999, he coached the San Francisco 49ers offensive line. During his 21 years with the 49ers, the team won five Super Bowls (Super Bowl XVI, Super Bowl XIX, Super Bowl XXIII, Super Bowl XXIV, and Super Bowl XXIX) and 13 NFC West championships.[1] McKittrick is one of only four coaches, the others being George Seifert, Ray Rhodes and Bill McPherson, to be a part of all five of the 49ers' Super Bowl-winning teams.

McKittrick's success derived from his ability to get the most effect out of unheralded talent. The 49ers' offensive line that won the various Super Bowls consisted of only one player drafted in the first round.[3]

Death and legacy

In January 1999, McKittrick was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma (cancer of the bile duct) and died 14 months later.[2] Later that same year, he was named to the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame for his excellence in coaching.[1]

Bobb McKittrick Award

This award is given annually to the 49ers offensive lineman who best exemplifies the dedication, excellence and commitment of offensive line coach Bobb McKittrick, a five-time Super Bowl champion.

In 1999, the San Francisco 49ers, under the direction of Bill Walsh, established the Bobb McKittrick Award. The award is meant to honor those offensive linemen who have best represented the courage, intensity and sacrifice displayed by the late Coach McKittrick during his 21 years of service with the 49ers.

“Bobb gave distinguished service to the organization since our renaissance in 1979. He was a vital factor in five Super Bowl championships, the evolution of a dynasty and in the production of some of the finest offensive linemen in football. Offensive linemen don’t receive the recognition they so richly deserve. This gives us a venue to honor their sacrifices and achievements”, Walsh said.

A bronze plaque of McKittrick hangs in the 49ers locker room surrounded by the photographs of the McKittrick Award winners.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Bobb McKittrick: Coaching". Oregon Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c Litsky, Frank (March 16, 2000). "Bobb McKittrick, 64, Coach of Standout Offensive Line for 49ers". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-03-05.
  3. ^ Barber, Phil (May 31, 2010). "McKittrick disciple Solari brings intensity to the 49ers". Press Democrat. Retrieved 2010-05-31.
1969 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1969 UCLA Bruins football team represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1969 college football season.

1979 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1979 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 30th year in the National Football League (NFL). The season is noted for being O. J. Simpson’s final year and Joe Montana’s first season, as well as the first year head coaching the 49ers for Bill Walsh.

The 1979 49ers are the only team in NFL history to lose 12 games in which they held a lead.

1980 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1980 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 31st in the National Football League. This was both Bill Walsh's and Joe Montana's second season with the team. The 49ers looked to improve on their previous output of 2–14 (which they had earned in both of the two previous seasons). They failed to make the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season, but they did improve to 6–10.On December 7, 1980, the 49ers staged the greatest come from behind victory in the history of the NFL's regular season. The 49ers rallied from 28 points down to defeat the New Orleans Saints by a score of 38–35 in Week Fourteen.

1982 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1982 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 33rd in the league. The team was coming off a Super Bowl victory over the Cincinnati Bengals. However, 1982 was strike-shortened, and only nine games were played. This season was the only one in an 18 season streak in which the 49ers did not win at least 10 games. This 49ers team was also the only team in history to win more than half its road games while losing all its home games. The 49ers were the fifth team in NFL history to enter a season as the defending Super Bowl champion and miss the playoffs.

1985 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1985 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 36th year with the National Football League.

49ers running back Roger Craig became the first player in NFL history to record both 1,000 rushing yards and 1,000 receiving yards in the same season. Craig rushed for 1,050 yards, and had 1,016 receiving yards.This season was Jerry Rice's first season in the league.

1986 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. The team returned to the top of the NFC West after a one-year absence, and lost the Divisional Playoffs to the Giants.

Joe Montana suffered a back injury in Week 1 and was lost for two months after surgery. Because the injury was so severe, doctors forced him to retire. However, Montana did return for Week 10 against the then-St. Louis Cardinals. Montana shared Comeback Player of the Year honors with Minnesota's Tommy Kramer at the end of the season.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

1991 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback.

In Week 17, the 49ers found themselves not controlling their destiny. The Atlanta Falcons had already swept the 49ers in 2 very close games in the regular season, and therefore held the tiebreaker in the wild card. The New Orleans Saints had a 10–5 record entering the week, and defeated the Phoenix Cardinals, winning the division.

1993 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1993 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive season and for the fifth time in six seasons. For the first time since 1978, Joe Montana was not on their active roster; specifically, the 49ers had traded him away to the Chiefs in April.

1996 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1996 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 51st since its inception. In commemoration, the 49ers wore a special 50th anniversary patch. They also wore a new uniform reminiscent of the 1994 throwback uniforms with white pants and shadowed numbers, but with a darker shade of red and an updated logo. The franchise tied for first place in the NFC West with a 12–4 record, but lost the division title to the Carolina Panthers on the division-record tiebreaker (the Panthers had swept the Niners in the season). The Niners were 3rd in the league in points scored and 4th in fewest points allowed.

Although the team was competitive the entire season, nagging and recurring injuries to offensive players and an inconsistent running game contributed to a what was considered a disappointing season. After a 14–0 Wild Card victory over the Philadelphia Eagles, the 49ers were defeated by the Green Bay Packers in the divisional playoffs 35–14. It would be George Seifert's final season as the 49ers' head coach and also the final San Francisco season for defensive coordinator Pete Carroll.

1997 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1997 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 48th year with the National Football League. The franchise appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the fifth time in the 1990s. This season marked their last appearance in the NFC title game until the 2011 season. The team's playoff run was ended by the Green Bay Packers for the third straight year.

Baker High School (Baker City, Oregon)

Baker High School is a public high school in the western United States, located in Baker City, Oregon. It is part of the Baker School District 5J.

Cut blocking

In gridiron football, cut blocking is an offensive line technique that consists of an offensive player knocking a defensive player down by hitting his knees. The technique, which was initially instilled by Bobb McKittrick, the offensive line coach of the San Francisco 49ers from 1979 to 1999, is often criticized as being "dirty." Additionally, it is illegal for an offensive player to "cut" a defensive player already engaged with another offensive player. This is considered a "chop block." In the NCAA, cut blocking is allowed as long as the block is away from the original position of the ball. The Fall Experimental Football League banned use of the cut block.

Eric Heitmann

Eric Wade Heitmann (born February 24, 1980) is a former center. He was drafted by the 49ers in the 7th round (239th overall) of the 2002 NFL Draft.

Jeremy Newberry

Jeremy David Newberry (born March 23, 1976 in Antioch, California) is a former center in the National Football League . He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the second round of the 1998 NFL Draft. He played college football at California.

Newberry has also played for the Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers.

Currently, Newberry works as the KPIX 5 NFL Analyst.

Jonathan Goodwin (American football)

Jonathan Scott Goodwin (born December 2, 1978) is a former American football center. He was drafted by the New York Jets in the fifth round of the 2002 NFL Draft. He played college football at Michigan. Goodwin has played for the New Orleans Saints and the San Francisco 49ers.

Matt Bouza

Matt Bouza (born April 8, 1958) is a former professional American football player who played wide receiver for eight seasons for the Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts.

Bouza graduated from Jesuit High School.

McKittrick

McKittrick may refer to:

PeopleAmanda Margaret Ross née McKittrick (1860-1939), known by her pen name Amanda McKittrick Ros, Northern Irish writer

Bobb McKittrick (1935-2000), American professional football player

David McKittrick (b. 1949), Northern Irish journalist

Ralph McKittrick (1877-1923), American golfer and tennis player

Rob McKittrick (b. 1973), American filmmakerPlacesMcKittrick Canyon, a scenic canyon in Texas in the United States

McKittrick Oil Field, an oil field in California in the United States

McKittrick, California, a census-designated place in Kern County, California, in the United States

McKittrick, Missouri, a city in Montgomery County, Missouri, in the United StatesSee alsoMcKitrick, an alternative spelling

McKitterick

Oregon Sports Hall of Fame

The Oregon Sports Hall of Fame honors Oregon athletes, teams, coaches, and others who have made a significant contribution to sports in Oregon. The first class was inducted in 1980, with new inductees added in the fall. Operated by the Oregon Sports Trust, the museum is currently closed in preparation for moving to another facility.

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