Bob Valesente

Bob Valesente (born July 19, 1940) is a former American football player and coach. He played college football at Ithaca College and spent more than 35 years as a football coach. He was the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks football team from 1986 to 1987 and has also served as an assistant football coach in the National Football League with multiple teams.

Bob Valesente
Biographical details
BornJuly 19, 1940 (age 78)
Seneca Falls, New York
Playing career
1960sIthaca
Position(s)Halfback, defensive back
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1964–1974Cornell (assistant)
1975–1976Cincinnati (assistant)
1977–1979Arizona (assistant)
1980–1981Mississippi State (DC)
1982–1983Baltimore Colts (assistant)
1984–1985Kansas (assistant)
1986–1987Kansas
1988Maryland (OC/QB)
1989Pittsburgh (DC/AHC)
1990–1991Pittsburgh Steelers (LB)
1992–1994Green Bay Packers (LB)
1995–1998Green Bay Packers (DB)
1999Carolina Panthers (DB)
2001–2003Frankfurt Galaxy (DC/LB)
Head coaching record
Overall4–17–1

Early years

A native of Seneca Falls, New York, Valesente attended Ithaca College in the early 1960s, where he played football as a halfback and defensive back.[1] He was also an All-American baseball player at Ithaca.[2]

Career

After leaving Ithaca, he played baseball in the Chicago Cubs minor league organization.[2] He played for the Pocatello Chiefs in the Pioneer League in 1963 and the St. Cloud Rox in 1964.[3][4]

Cornell

Valesente began his coaching career in 1964 as the coach of the freshman football team at Cornell University.[5] He spent 11 years as an assistant coach at Cornell and was the defensive secondary coach from 1969 to 1974.[2]

Cincinnati, Arizona, and Mississippi State

In 1975, Valesente was hired as the secondary coach at the University of Cincinnati under head coach Tony Mason. Valesente held that position for the 1975 and 1976 seasons. When Mason was hired as the head football coach at the University of Arizona in 1977, Valesente followed and assumed responsibility for the Arizona secondary.[2] Valesente and Mason remained at Arizona from 1977 to 1979. In April 1980, Mason resigned after reportedly having been given a "quit-or-be-fired" option by the school. Three months later, Mason, Valesente and two others were indicted in Pima County Superior Court on charges that they had "bilked" the university out of $13,000 in travel funds. The Arizona coaches were alleged to have engaged in a conspiracy with an American Airlines employee in which the airline employee allegedly gave Mason and his coaching staff ticket receipts for trips they never took, which the coaches then submitted for reimbursement to the university. Valesente entered a not guilty plea to the charges.[6] A jury found Mason not guilty following a trial in 1981, and Arizona Attorney General Bob Corbin announced in September 1981 that all remaining criminal charges had been dismissed against Valesente and the other defendants. Corbin also noted that a demand letter had been sent to Valesente requesting his return of $1,185 and that a civil action may be filed if the demand letter was not satisfied.[7]

He was the defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at Mississippi State University from 1980 to 1981.[1] While at Mississippi State, he helped direct the team to a win over the University of Kansas in the Hall of Fame Bowl in 1981.[8]

Baltimore Colts

In February 1982, Valesente was hired by the Baltimore Colts as the secondary and special teams coach under new head coach Frank Kush.[9] Valesente remained with the Colts for the 1982 and 1983 NFL seasons.[1]

Kansas

In April 1984, Valesente was hired as the assistant head coach and offensive coordinator at the University of Kansas.[8] Shortly after being hired at Kansas, he was admitted to the Kansas University Medical Center after suffering chest pains and underwent emergency heart bypass surgery.[10] Valesente remained as offensive coordinator for the 1984 and 1985 seasons.[11] He took over as the head coach for the Kansas Jayhawks football team in 1986 and 1987. During Valesente's two seasons as head coach, the Jayhawks compiled a record of 4–17–1 and went 0–13-1 against Big Eight opponents.[12][13][14] The Jayhawks went 1–9–1 in 1987 with their only win being a 16–15 game against Southern Illinois.[14] Valesente was fired at the end of the 1987 football season.[15] At the time of his firing, Valesente was in the second year of a four-year contract, which athletic director Bob Frederick said would be honored. Valesente told reporters, "I don't believe two years is enough to build a program. I just don't feel we've been given enough time."[16] Valesente had undertaken efforts to improve the team's academic standing and noted, "I feel proud of the fact that we have begun to overcome some of the immense academic problems that have plagued us. We needed to first stop the academic attrition."[16] Anthony Redwood, the chairman of the Kansas Athletic Corporation board and a business professor, resigned from the board in protest of the firing. Redwood noted, "Apparently we lack the courage at this institution to plan a course of action and stick with it. Certainly to the outside world this decision must call into question our commitment to the academic dimension of intercollegiate athletics."[17] Valesente's .204 winning percentage is the second-worst for a non-interim coach in KU history.

Maryland and Pittsburgh

He spent the 1988 season as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach for the Maryland Terrapins football team.[18][19] Valesente resigned after one year with Maryland.[20]

In 1989, he served as the defensive coordinator for the Pitt Panthers football team and was fired after one season in the position.[5]

Pittsburgh Steelers, Green Bay Packers and Carolina Panthers

In March 1990, he was hired by Chuck Noll as the linebackers coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers.[1] After two years with the Steelers, Valesente was hired by the Green Bay Packers in January 1992 to serve as their linebackers coach.[21] From 1995 to 1998, he was the defensive backs coach for the Green Bay Packers.[22] In January 1999, George Seifert hired Valesente as defensive backs coach with the Carolina Panthers.[23] After one year in Carolina, Valesente announced his retirement in March 2000. At the time, Valesente said, "After 37 years of coaching, I decided I needed to spend more time with my family to enjoy all life has to offer. Coaching is a very demanding career that doesn't allow much free time."[24]

NFL Europe

Valesente later worked in the NFL Europe as a defensive coordinator for the Frankfurt Galaxy.[25][26]

Amateur football in Europe

In 2010, he served as the defensive coordinator for the Kiel Baltic Hurricanes in the German Football League.[27][28] Kiel won German Bowl XXXII that year and finished first in scoring defense, in overall defense and in passing defense.[29] He left Kiel before the 2011 season because of health issues,[30] but later returned to the sideline for one game during the German Bowl XXXIII loss to the Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns.[31]

In December 2014, he was named defensive coordinator for the French national football team, where he was reunited with head coach Patrick Esume, who was also his head coach in Kiel.[32] In July 2015, France finish fourth at the 2015 IFAF World Championship, after a loss against Mexico (20-7).[33] In July 2017, he won the World Games championship against Germany with the French national football team (14-6).[34]

Family

Valesente and his wife, Joan Valesente, have three children, Ginger, Rob, and Michelle.[2][35]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Kansas Jayhawks (Big Eight Conference) (1986–1987)
1986 Kansas 3–8 0–7 8th
1987 Kansas 1–9–1 0–6–1 T–7th
Kansas: 4–17–1 0–13–1
Total: 4–17–1

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Pitt assistant coach joins Steelers". Gettysburg Times. 1990-03-10.
  2. ^ a b c d e Bruce Johnston (1977-03-24). "New UA coaches: Valesente found opportunity". Tucson Daily Citizen.
  3. ^ "Cowboys Blast Pocatello 72–6". Idaho State Journal. 1963-08-09.
  4. ^ "St. Cloud Hurler Becomes 'Thorne' In Goldies' Side". Winnipeg Free Press. 1964-06-03.
  5. ^ a b "Defensive coordinator Valesente fired by Pitt". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 1990-01-06.
  6. ^ (UPI story) (1980-08-01). "Trial Set for Trio of AU Coaches". The Progress.
  7. ^ "Coaches face suits". Roswell Daily Record. 1981-09-11.
  8. ^ a b "Duo join Jayhawk football staff". Salina Journal. 1984-04-04.
  9. ^ "Colts add coach". The Capital (Annapolis, Maryland). 1982-02-18.
  10. ^ "Drills". Salina Journal. 1984-04-13.
  11. ^ "Valesente close to making move". Lawrence Journal World. 1988-02-23.
  12. ^ "Bob Valesente Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  13. ^ "1986 Kansas Jayhawks". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  14. ^ a b "1987 Kansas Jayhawks". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  15. ^ "Kansas fires Valesente". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. 1987-11-24.
  16. ^ a b "Valesente axed by Kansas". Hutchinson. 1987-11-24.
  17. ^ "KU faculty angered, call move unjustified". Hutchinson. 1987-11-24.
  18. ^ "Maryland still hasn't added Valesente". Lawrence Journal-World. 1998-02-25.
  19. ^ Dave Sell (1988-08-12). "O'Donnell Wants Fun From Start; He and Terrapins Seek Early Success". The Washington Post.
  20. ^ Dave Sell (1989-03-04). "Maryland Smarting After Loss;Terrapins May Face N.C. State Again". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 2012-11-04.
  21. ^ Bob McGinn (1992-01-24). "Jauron to be the only holdover from Infante's coaching staff". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  22. ^ Bob McGinn (1995-09-24). "Valesente's secondary plays aggressively He wants his players to tackle like linebackers". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  23. ^ Joe Menzer (1999-01-28). "SEIFERT ADDS MILLS, SIMMONS, VALESENTE TO COACHING STAFF". Winston-Salem Journal.
  24. ^ "Defensive Backs Coach Retires". Charlotte Observer. 2000-03-10.
  25. ^ Brian Herman (2001-04-21). "Here and There". The Valley Independent.
  26. ^ Brian Herman (2003-04-04). "Here and There". The Valley Independent.
  27. ^ Bob Valesente in Aktion
  28. ^ Bob Valesente kommt nach Kiel
  29. ^ German Football League Team Stats 2010
  30. ^ Bob Valesente muss abreisen
  31. ^ Coach Val zurück in Kiel
  32. ^ LES HEAD COACHS DES ÉQUIPES DE FRANCE SENIOR ET JUNIOR OFFICIELLEMENT NOMMÉS
  33. ^ Mexico Beats France To Win Bronze At The World Championship
  34. ^ France takes American football gold, Germany with a silver medal
  35. ^ Matt Siegel (1994-12-26). "Former Kansas football coach helps Packers add to tradition". The Kansas City Star.
1982 Baltimore Colts season

The 1982 Baltimore Colts season was the 30th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL), and the Colts’ penultimate season in Baltimore. The Colts finished the NFL’s strike-shortened 1982 season without a victory, finishing with eight losses and one tie in their nine games. The Colts joined the 1976 Tampa Bay Buccaneers as the second team since the AFL-NFL merger to finish a regular season winless. They were later joined by the 2008 Detroit Lions and the 2017 Cleveland Browns.

The NFL's 1982 season was disrupted by a strike by the league's players. In the Colts’ first game after the end of the strike on November 21, they were shut out by the New York Jets 37–0. The following week, they were shut out by the Buffalo Bills 20–0, in a game in which the Colt offense never crossed the 50 yard line. But the week after that, they lost by only three points to the playoff-bound and defending AFC champion Cincinnati Bengals.

This was the Colts' penultimate season in Baltimore before the team moved to Indianapolis in 1984 where they play to this day.

1986 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1986 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Bob Valesente, the Jayhawks compiled a 3–8 record (0–7 against conference opponents), tied for last place in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 327 to 112. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Mike Orth with 1,548 passing yards, Arnold Snell with 672 rushing yards, and Ronnie Caldwell with 423 receiving yards. Phil Forte, Mike Orth, Paul Oswald, Wayne Ziegler, and John Randolph were the team captains.

1987 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1987 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second and final season under head coach Bob Valesente, the Jayhawks compiled a 1–9–1 record (0–6–1 against conference opponents), finished in seventh place in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 398 to 135. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Kelly Donohoe with 981 passing yards, Arnold Snell with 691 rushing yards, and Willie Vaughn with 672 receiving yards. Team captains were selected game by game.

1989 Pittsburgh Panthers football team

The 1989 Pittsburgh Panthers football team represented the University of Pittsburgh in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1999 Carolina Panthers season

The 1999 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League and the 1st and under head coach George Seifert who replaced Dom Capers as head coach. They improved upon their 4–12 record in 1998, and the Panthers went 8–8, their first .500 record in franchise history, But failed to make the playoffs for the second time in franchise history.

2001 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2001 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the ninth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his first year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in sixth place with a record of three wins and seven losses.

2002 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2002 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the tenth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his second year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in third place with a record of six wins and four losses.

2003 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2003 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the 11th season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his third year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in first place with a record of six wins and four losses. In World Bowl XI, Frankfurt defeated the Rhein Fire 35–16. The victory marked the franchise's third World Bowl championship.

Adrian Lindsey

Adrian Hobart "Ad" Lindsey (August 15, 1895 – October 2, 1980) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas from 1922 to 1926, at the University of Oklahoma from 1927 to 1931, and at the University of Kansas from 1932 to 1938, compiling a career college football record of 66–64–16. Lindsey was also the head baseball coach at Kansas for one season in 1921, tallying a mark of 13–2.

Arthur Hale Curtis

Arthur Hale Curtis (May 20, 1881 – November 13, 1955) was an American football player, coach, and gynecologist. He served as the head coach at the University of Kansas in 1902 and at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1903 to 1904, compiling a career college football record of 17–10–1. Curtis earned an MD degree from Rush Medical College in 1905. He interned at Cook County Hospital and became a member of the Northwestern University Medical School faculty in 1910. Curtis was born on May 20, 1881 in Portage, Wisconsin. He died of a heart attack in 1955.

Chuck Mather

Charles V. Mather (April 17, 1915 – May 20, 2006) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Kansas from 1954 until 1957, compiling a record of 11–26–3.

Mather was the high school coach of Don James, who started his coaching career under Mather at Kansas as a graduate assistant. James was later a head coach at Kent State (1971–1974) and Washington (1975–1992).

H. M. Wheaton

Henry Myers "Jack" Wheaton (July 5, 1886 – December 12, 1944) was an American football player and coach. He played for Yale University from 1907 to 1909. Wheaton was the 13th head football coach at the University of Kansas, serving for one season, in 1914, and compiling a record of 5–2–1.

Henry Shenk

Henry Arthur Shenk (November 29, 1906 – July 29, 1989) was an American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at the University of Kansas from 1943 to 1945, compiling a record of 11–16–3.

Jay Bond

James Edward "Jay" Bond (April 11, 1885 – May 15, 1954) was an American football and baseball coach. He was the 16th head football coach at the University of Kansas, serving the 1918 season, which was shortened due to an outbreak of influenza on campus. Bond's 1918 Kansas Jayhawks football team compiled a record of 2–2. Bond was also the head baseball coach at Kansas from 1918 to 1919, tallying a mark of 5–9.

Leon McCarty

Leon McCarty (June 20, 1888 – September 18, 1962) was an American football and baseball coach. He was the 17th head football coach at the University of Kansas, serving for one season, in 1919, and compiling a record of 3–2–3. McCarty also was head baseball coach at Kansas from 1914 to 1917 and in 1920, tallying a record of 37–21–1 and winning Missouri Valley Conference championships in 1914 and 1915.

McCarty was a 1910 graduate of Ohio State University, where he lettered in football in 1908 and 1909.

List of Kansas Jayhawks football seasons

The following is a list of Kansas Jayhawks football seasons including the coaches in each season and competition scores and rankings from 1890 to present day. The sports teams at the University of Kansas (KU), in Lawrence, Kansas, are known as the Jayhawks. When the University of Kansas fielded their first football team in 1890, the team was called the Jayhawkers.

List of Kansas Jayhawks head football coaches

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is a college football team that represents the University of Kansas in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The current coach is Les Miles. The team has had 38 head coaches and two interim head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1890 with the nickname Jayhawks. The team played its first season without a head coach. Kansas joined the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. After several changes, the conference eventually became the Big Eight Conference. The Jayhawks became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the Big Eight disbanded. Seven coaches have led Kansas to postseason bowl games: George Sauer, Jack Mitchell, Pepper Rodgers, Don Fambrough, Bud Moore, Glen Mason and Mark Mangino. Four coaches have won conference championships with the Jayhawks: A. R. Kennedy, Bill Hargiss, Sauer and Rodgers.

Mason is the all-time leader in games coached (102), and is tied with Mitchell for most years coached with nine. Kennedy is the all-time leader in total wins with 52. Fielding H. Yost has the highest winning percentage of any Jayhawk coach with a 10–0 record (1.000) his only year. Of coaches who served more than one season, Wylie G. Woodruff leads with a .833 winning percentage, barely edging out Kennedy's winning percentage of .831. Current head coach David Beaty is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Jayhawks have had (.081). Of the 38 Kansas coaches, Yost is the only one that has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach. Mangino won several coach of the year accolades after the 2007 season, the only Jayhawks coach to do so.

Ralph W. Sherwin

Ralph Waldo Sherwin (January 31, 1888 – May 17, 1963) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at Dartmouth College, playing left tackle. He served as the 14th head coach at the University of Kansas for a single season in 1911, compiling a record of 4–2–2. Sherwin was the head coach of the visiting team in the first American football homecoming game. He died on May 17, 1963, following a short illness, at his home in Dover, New Hampshire.

Tony Barker

Anthony Ray Barker (born September 7, 1968) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Rice University.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.