Bob Unglaub

Robert Alexander Unglaub (July 31, 1881 – November 29, 1916) was an American first baseman, utility infielder and manager in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Highlanders, Boston Americans, and Washington Senators.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, he attended the University of Maryland, and in 1904 he was offered his first shot at the major leagues, being signed by the Highlanders. Due to blood poisoning, he was only able to play six games, and was sent to the Americans for Patsy Dougherty, which some people perceived as the American League's attempt to increase competition against the National League's New York Giants.[1] He didn't become a regular player until the 1907 season when he also served as manager of the Red Sox, replacing George Huff. He went 9–20 (.310) in his only managerial stint.

Unglaub had a series of minor league managerial jobs, and in 1916, while supervising repair work on a locomotive, he was killed in an accident in his hometown of Baltimore at age 35.[2] He was laid to rest at Sunny Ridge Memorial Park in Crisfield, Maryland.[1]

Bob Unglaub
Bob Unglaub baseball card
First baseman / Utility infielder / Manager
Born: July 31, 1881
Baltimore, Maryland
Died: November 29, 1916 (aged 35)
Baltimore, Maryland
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1904, for the New York Highlanders
Last MLB appearance
September 17, 1910, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Batting average.258
Home runs5
Runs batted in216
Managerial record9–20
Winning %.310
Teams
As player

As manager

See also

References

  1. ^ a b BaseballLibrary.com Archived October 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved October 24, 2006.
  2. ^ TheDeadBallEra.com – Unglaub's Obituary Archived November 12, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved October 24, 2006.

External links

1881 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1881 throughout the world.

1904 Boston Americans season

The 1904 Boston Americans season was the fourth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 95 wins and 59 losses, ​1 1⁄2 games ahead of the New York Highlanders. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds. The Americans were set to play the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1904 World Series, however the Giants refused to play.

1904 New York Highlanders season

The 1904 New York Highlanders season, their second in New York and fourth overall, finished with the team in second place in the American League with a record of 92–59. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played home games at Hilltop Park.

1905 Boston Americans season

The 1905 Boston Americans season was the fifth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 74 losses. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1907 Boston Americans season

The 1907 Boston Americans season was the seventh season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 59 wins and 90 losses. Including spring training, the team had five different managers during the season. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1907 Major League Baseball season

The 1907 Major League Baseball season. The Chicago Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–0–1 to win the World Series.

The Philadelphia Phillies set a Major League record for the fewest at bats by a team in a season – 4,725.

1908 Boston Red Sox season

The 1908 Boston Red Sox season was the eighth season for the Major League Baseball franchise previously known as the Boston Americans. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1908 Washington Senators season

The 1908 Washington Senators won 67 games, lost 85, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Joe Cantillon and played home games at National Park.

1909 Washington Senators season

The 1909 Washington Senators, a professional baseball team, won 42 games, lost 110, and finished in eighth (last) place in the American League. They were managed by Joe Cantillon and played home games at National Park. The Senators still hold the Major League record for the most games lost in one month of a season, with 29 losses (and only 5 wins) in July.

1910 Washington Senators season

The 1910 Washington Senators won 66 games, lost 85, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Jimmy McAleer and played home games at National Park.

1916 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1916 throughout the world.

Adam DeBus

Adam Joseph DeBus, Jr. (October 7, 1892 – May 13, 1977) was a German American professional baseball player whose career spanned three seasons, one of which was spent with the Major League Baseball (MLB) Pittsburgh Pirates (1917). Over his MLB career, DeBus, an infielder, compiled a .229 batting average with nine runs scored, 30 hits, five doubles, four triples, seven runs batted in (RBIs) and two stolen bases in 38 games played. Originally, Debus signed with the MLB St. Louis Cardinals out of the Northern League, but his contract was waived after never making an appearance. He then signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates and made his MLB debut on July 14, 1917, against the Brooklyn Robins. During his career, DeBus weighed 150 pounds (68 kg) and stood at 5 feet 11 inches (180 cm). He batted and threw right-handed.

Fargo-Moorhead Twins

The Fargo-Moorhead Twins were a minor league baseball team that existed from 1933 to 1942 and from 1946 to 1960. They played in the Northern League and were affiliated with the Cleveland Indians from 1934 to 1940 and from 1953 to 1957, the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1947 to 1948 and the New York Yankees from 1958 to 1960. They represented the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and Moorhead, Minnesota. The previous Fargo-Moorhead team in the Northern League was the Fargo-Moorehead Graingrowers, who played from 1914-1917.

George Huff (coach)

George A. Huff, Jr. (June 11, 1872 – October 1, 1936) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. Huff served as the head football coach at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1895 to 1899, compiling a record of 21–16–3. He was also the head baseball coach at Illinois from 1896 to 1919, tallying a mark of 317–97–4, and the athletic director at Illinois from 1901 to 1935. Huff Hall at the University of Illinois in Champaign is named in his honor.

Huff was briefly a manager for the Boston Americans at the start of the 1907 Major League Baseball season following the sudden suicide of Chick Stahl. Cy Young started out as the player/manager, but after six games stepped down in favor of Huff. Huff managed only eight games, finishing with a career 2–6 managerial record, before resigning on May 1, 1907 to return to his old job. Bob Unglaub replaced him. The Americans had a total of four managers in the 1907 season. The team was renamed as the Boston Red Sox the following season.

Joe Kerrigan

Joseph Thomas Kerrigan (born November 30, 1954 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former relief pitcher, manager and longtime pitching coach in Major League Baseball.

List of Boston Red Sox captains

Eighteen different players have been full-time captains of the Boston Red Sox, an American professional baseball franchise also known previously as the Boston Americans. The list was created from scratch by baseball historian Howard W. Rosenberg in 2004. The Red Sox front office contacted Rosenberg in advance of Jason Varitek being named captain that year, after learning that Rosenberg, author of a 2003 book featuring captains in 19th-century baseball, had disputed the official count of captains in New York Yankees franchise history.In Major League Baseball, a captain is an honorary title given to the member of the team primarily responsible for strategy and teamwork while the game is in progress on the field. This role has been particularly important during eras and situations in which managers and coaches have been precluded by the rules from interacting with players on the field while the game is in progress. As is the case with the National Hockey League, then- and now-retired captain Varitek wore a distinctive "C" on the left side of his jersey.

List of Boston Red Sox managers

The Boston Red Sox are a professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). There have been 47 different managers in their franchise history; four during the era of the Boston Americans (1901–1907) and the rest under the Boston Red Sox (1908–present). In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. Since 1912, the Red Sox have played their home games at Fenway Park.Jimmy Collins was the first manager of the Americans and managed from 1901 to 1906. Joe Cronin managed the most games with 1,987 and wins with 1,071 with the Red Sox. Terry Francona, a recent manager of the Red Sox, managed the most playoff games with 42 and wins with 28. Bill Carrigan and Francona have each won two World Series championships. Carrigan won his two championships in 1915 and 1916, while Francona won his two championships in 2004 and 2007. John McNamara and Jimy Williams are the only two Red Sox managers to win the AL Manager of the Year Award, in 1986 and 1999 respectively. On October 22, 2017 the Red Sox named Alex Cora their manager after firing John Farrell on October 11, 2017.

List of Major League Baseball players (U)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2010 season, there have been 53 players with a last name that begins with U who have been on a major league roster at some point.

List of athletes from Maryland N – Z

Maryland has a long history concerning sports and a number of major and minor professional sport figures have hailed from the state. Maryland enjoys considerable historical repute for the talented sports players of its past, including Cal Ripken Jr, Michael Phelps and Babe Ruth.

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