Bob Tewksbury

Robert Alan Tewksbury (born November 30, 1960) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher and current Mental Skills Coordinator for the Chicago Cubs. He played professionally for the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, San Diego Padres and the Minnesota Twins.

Bob Tewksbury has the lowest ratio of base on balls per innings pitched for any starting pitcher to pitch in the major leagues since the 1920s, and the lowest ratio for any pitcher to pitch since the 1800s except for Deacon Phillippe, Babe Adams, Dan Quisenberry, and Addie Joss.[1]

Bob Tewksbury
1984 Nashville Bob Tewksbury
Tewksbury with the Nashville Sounds in 1984
Pitcher
Born: November 30, 1960 (age 58)
Concord, New Hampshire
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 11, 1986, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 26, 1998, for the Minnesota Twins
MLB statistics
Win–Loss record110–102
Earned run average3.92
Strikeouts812
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Tewksbury was born in Concord, New Hampshire[2] and attended Merrimack Valley High School in Penacook, New Hampshire. He played college baseball at Rutgers and Saint Leo University.[3]

Playing career

Tewksbury's talent was initially discovered by Andy Michael in Concord. Michael contacted the New York Yankees and Tewksbury was drafted by them out of Saint Leo University in the 19th round of the 1981 Major League Baseball draft. He played for the Yankees for two years, and was then sent to the Chicago Cubs. As a free agent in 1988, he signed with the St. Louis Cardinals, where he would stay until 1994. Again a free agent, he went to the Texas Rangers for a year. In 1996, he signed with the San Diego Padres for one more year. In December 1996, he signed with the Minnesota Twins and played for two years with the team,[4] but shoulder problems effectively ended his baseball career after that.

Due to the shoulder and arm problems he faced over the course of his playing career, Tewksbury became known as an excellent control pitcher.[5] His best year was 1992, in which he went 16-5 on the season and had a 2.16 ERA in 233 innings pitched. He appeared in the All-Star game[6] and was third in the Cy Young Award voting that year.[7] His injury problems marred his success from that point forward, with his best post-Cardinals year being in San Diego, where he helped the Padres capture the NL West division title.

In 1992 Tewksbury walked only 20 batters in 233 innings, the best ratio in the major leagues in over half a century. The next season Tewksbury came very close to ending the season with more wins than bases on balls allowed, an elusive feat only accomplished 4 times by 3 different starting pitchers in MLB history. He had 17 wins with only 18 walks allowed late in the season but gave up a walk apiece in his last two starts and did not achieve a win in either game, ending the season with 17 wins on 20 walks.

In 1997, the ever-crafty Tewksbury threw an Eephus pitch, joining an elite few who have thrown the "junkiest pitch in baseball." He threw it to power-hitter Mark McGwire in an interleague play game at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome and McGwire grounded out on the pitch – twice.[8][9] Tewksbury's son, Griffin, has been quoted as calling this pitch "The Dominator."[10]

During and after his baseball career, he became well known for his philanthropy. He has done a lot of work for the Boys and Girls Club of America,[11] as well as hospital visits for sick children.

After retirement

After retiring, Tewksbury worked as a player development consultant for the Boston Red Sox and appeared as a commentator for Red Sox coverage on the New England Sports Network[12] He earned his bachelor of science degree in physical education at St. Leo University in 2000 and earned his master's degree in psychology at Boston University in 2004.[13][14]

Tewksbury has been a sports psychology coach since 2004.[15] He is an Adjunct Professor of Sport Psychology & Exercise at NHTI, Concord's Community College.[16] Tewksbury still lives in New Hampshire, continuing his charitable work.

Tewksbury played himself in the movie The Scout.[17]

Awards and honors

Tewksbury was inducted into the Saint Leo Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.[18]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Bases On Balls per 9 IP". Retrieved 2018-12-12.
  2. ^ "Concord, New Hampshire". New England Condominium. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  3. ^ "Bob Tewksbury Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  4. ^ "This Week in Concord History". The Concord Insider. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  5. ^ "Where are they now? Bob Tewksbury". ST. Louis Cardinals. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  6. ^ "Museum". New Hampshire Historical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-12-20. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  7. ^ "Cy Young Award National League Vote Analysis". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  8. ^ "Tewksbury slows down McGwire with 44 mph lobs". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on December 21, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  9. ^ Dickson, Paul (2011). The Dickson Baseball Dictionary (Third Edition). W. W. Norton & Company. p. 288.
  10. ^ "Twins Tame McGwire, Cardinals". Retrieved 2018-01-25.
  11. ^ "Bob Tewksbury". Boston Globe. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  12. ^ "Bob Tewksbury". The Boston Globe. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  13. ^ "Former Major Leaguer/Sports Psychologist Bob Tewksbury to Speak at Monday's Community Meeting". New Hampton School. Archived from the original on December 20, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  14. ^ "Tewksbury a head coach". The Boston Globe. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  15. ^ "Tewksbury recalls past game with Cards' Cherre". RedSox.com. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  16. ^ "Former Major Leaguer/Sports Psychologist Bob Tewksbury to Speak at Monday's Community Meeting". New Hampton School. Archived from the original on December 20, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  17. ^ "Not Quite Drama, Not Quite Comedy, 'The Scout' Strikes Out". The Courant. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  18. ^ "Inside Athletics". The Official Site of the Saint Leo University Lions. Archived from the original on 2013-12-21. Retrieved December 20, 2013.

External links

1986 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1986 season was the 84th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 90-72, finishing in second-place, 5.5 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Lou Piniella. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1987 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1987 season was the 85th season for the Yankees. The team finished in fourth place with a record of 89-73, finishing 9 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Lou Piniella. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1990 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1990 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 109th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 99th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 70-92 during the season and finished 6th (and last) in the National League East division, 25 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates. It was one of the few times that the Cardinals had finished in last place, and the first, and only time that it has happened since 1918.

1991 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1991 season was the team's 110th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 100th season in the National League. The Cardinals rebounded from a rare last-place finish a year earlier to register a record of 84-78 during the season and finished 2nd to the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League East division by fourteen games.

Ozzie Smith set the National League record for fewest errors in a season by a shortstop with 8 errors. Gold Gloves were awarded to catcher Tom Pagnozzi and shortstop Ozzie Smith this year.

1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 63rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1992, at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13–6.

1992 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1992 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 111th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 101st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83-79 during the season and finished third in the National League East division, 13 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

1993 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1993 season was the team's 112th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 102nd season in the National League. Under their manager Joe Torre, the Cardinals went 87-75 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League East Division, ten games behind the NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies. This was the final season in the NL East for the Cardinals, before their move to the NL Central for the following season.

1997 Minnesota Twins season

The 1997 Minnesota Twins will not be remembered as the strongest team the Twins ever fielded. Manager Tom Kelly's team consisted of a few solid players, but mainly past-their-prime veterans and never-to-be-established prospects. One of the few bright spots was pitcher Brad Radke's breakout season, in which he won 20 games, at one point had 12 consecutive victories, tying a record Scott Erickson set in 1991. The team finished with a 68-94 record, good enough for fourth place in what proved to be the league's weakest division that season. The Cleveland Indians, who won the division that year, made it all the way to the World Series, but lost in seven games to the Florida Marlins.

1998 Minnesota Twins season

Like many Twins teams of its half-decade, the 1998 Minnesota Twins neither impressed nor contended. The team finished with a 70-92 record, with subpar batting and pitching. The season was not without its bright spots, as individual players had solid seasons and Hall of Fame designated hitter Paul Molitor announced his retirement at the end of the season. Tom Kelly's team had plenty of lowlights, most notably David Wells' perfect game against the team on May 17 at Yankee Stadium.

List of St. Louis Cardinals team records

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). in 1892. Before joining the NL, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships, tying one other, and 23 league pennants. 11 of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; the other championship and tie occurred in 1885–1886. 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

Notable players have defined, in part, the Cardinals' success and history. Stan Musial owns the most career batting records with 22. Rogers Hornsby owns the most single-season records with 11. Bob Gibson owns the most career pitching records with 18. Silver King owns the most single-season pitching records with nine.

Merrimack Valley High School

Merrimack Valley is a four-year high school located in Penacook, a village in the northern part of Concord, New Hampshire. The school has approximately 900 students and serves the communities of Andover, Boscawen, Loudon, Penacook, Salisbury, and Webster. Two years of construction and remodeling were completed in 2007, resulting in a completely new facility.

The school was initially accredited by the New England Association of School and Colleges (NEASC) in 1967. The faculty, staff, students, and community began self-study for reaccreditation in 2009; the next visiting team came in 2011. In 2003, the school was recognized by the New Hampshire Excellence in Education award (EDies) for being the best high school in the state of New Hampshire.

Norm Kaye

Norm Kaye ("Coach K") founded the Sunshine State Conference (SSC) of the U.S. National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) in 1975 in Florida. The SSC is one of the NCAA Division II sports conferences in the United States, having won 83 national championships. The six charter conference members were: Biscayne College (now called St. Thomas University), Florida Technological University (now University of Central Florida), Eckerd College, Florida Southern, Rollins College, and Saint Leo College.

At the time of the conference's founding, Kaye was Athletic Director and Head Basketball Coach at Saint Leo College (now Saint Leo University). Kaye served as Commissioner of the SSC in its first year of existence, and then served as Executive Director of the conference for the following 12 years.

He was instrumental in building the Saint Leo athletic program over the course of five decades. He pioneered the professional physical education program at Saint Leo, which included Sports Management, Teacher Education, and General Physical Education. In 1977 he was named Chairman of the Division of Physical Education. Kaye also served Saint Leo for a three-year period as Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Financial Aid.

Kaye is credited with coaching and mentoring hundreds of successful athletes and students. Notable Saint Leo baseball players who played in Major League Baseball include Fred Cambria, Brian Dayett, Bob Tewksbury, and Jim Corsi. J. P. Ricciardi played baseball for Saint Leo and afterwards in the minor leagues before becoming a scout in the Oakland Athletics organization and later a front office position. Ricciardi later became General Manager of the Toronto Blue Jays and is special assistant to New York Mets General Manager Sandy Alderson. Current San Francisco Giants General Manager Brian Sabean was an assistant baseball coach at Saint Leo. In 1984 Kaye hired former Major League Baseball Cy Young Award Winner Mike Marshall to be head baseball coach at Saint Leo. Mark Carlson, a former student sports information director for Kaye, is current Director of Broadcasting for the United States Golf Association (USGA).

Steve Trout

Steven Russell Trout (born July 30, 1957, in Detroit, Michigan) is a former major league baseball pitcher who played during the 1980s.

He is the son of former major league pitcher Dizzy Trout (but no relation to Mike Trout). He had the nickname "Rainbow".

Tewksbury (surname)

Tewksbury is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Bob Tewksbury (born 1960), American baseball pitcher

Mark Tewksbury (born 1968), Canadian swimmer

Peter Tewksbury (1923–2003), American filmmaker

Walter Tewksbury (1876–1968), American athlete

The Scout (film)

The Scout is a 1994 American comedy film starring Brendan Fraser and Albert Brooks and directed by Michael Ritchie, the director of The Bad News Bears.

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