Bob Shawkey

James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 – December 31, 1980) was an American baseball pitcher who played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1915 to 1927. He batted and threw right-handed and served primarily as a starting pitcher.

Bob Shawkey
1922 Bob Shawkey.jpeg
Shawkey pitching for the New York Yankees in 1922
Pitcher / Manager
Born: December 4, 1890
Sigel, Pennsylvania
Died: December 31, 1980 (aged 90)
Syracuse, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 16, 1913, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1927, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record195–150
Earned run average3.09
Strikeouts1,360
Managerial record86–68
Winning %.558
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Early life

Shawkey was born to John William Shawkey and Sarah Catherine Anthony, in Sigel, Pennsylvania.

Professional career

He moved from Slippery Rock State College to an independent league in 1911, then to the American League in 1912 as a pitcher for Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics. In 1915, Mack sold him to the New York Yankees where he remained (except for a brief service with the U.S. Navy during World War I when he served on the battleship Arkansas for eight months) until 1931. While facing his former team in 1919, he struck out 15 A's batters in a game, setting the Yankees team record for most strikeouts in a game; this record lasted for fifty-nine years.[1]

Bob Shawkey, Philadelphia Athletics pitcher (cropped)
Shawkey as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics.

At the start of the 1923 season, Shawkey was chosen to be the Yankees' Opening Day starting pitcher.[2] Because the team's first game was at home, this also meant that he was the first player to pitch at the newly built Yankee Stadium.[1] The Yankees won 4–1 behind Babe Ruth's three-run home run, with Shawkey pitching a complete game to become the first winning pitcher at the stadium.[3]

Shawkey also served as the Yankees' manager in the 1930 season—following the sudden death of Miller Huggins—and guided the Yankees to a third-place finish.[1]

Shawkey won 195 games in his career, and won 20 or more games in five different seasons (his high was 26). Shawkey is noted as the starting pitcher in the first game played in Yankee Stadium on April 18, 1923, and set the franchise record for 15 strikeouts in a single game, which stood until Whitey Ford broke it in the early 1960s. Bob credited his success to a super fastball and an outstanding curve ball. He later served as the baseball coach for Dartmouth College.

An adept batsman during his 15 year career, Shawkey compiled a .214 batting average (225-for-1049) with 90 runs, 3 home runs and 95 RBI. From 1920-1924, he drove in 59 runs for the New York Yankees. In 8 World Series games, he hit .267 (4-for-15) with 2 RBI.

In 1970, Shawkey was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in Brookville, Pennsylvania. During the 1976 opening day festivities for the renovated Yankee Stadium, Shawkey threw out the ceremonial first pitch. He died at age 90 in Syracuse, New York on New Year's Eve 1980.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Frommer, Harvey (November 1, 2007). Yankee Century and Beyond: A Celebration of the First Hundred Plus Years of Baseball's Greatest Team. Sourcebooks, Inc. pp. 235–236. ISBN 9781402248740. Retrieved November 5, 2013.
  2. ^ "New York Yankees Opening Day Starters". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 2, 2013.
  3. ^ "April 18, 1923 Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. April 18, 1923. Retrieved November 2, 2013.

External links

1913 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1913 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 96 wins and 57 losses. The team then defeated the New York Giants in the 1913 World Series, 4 games to 1.

In 2001, baseball historian Bill James ranked the 1913 incarnation of the Athletics' famous "$100,000 infield" as the best of all time in major league history (first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, third baseman Frank "Home Run" Baker, shortstop Jack Barry).

1914 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1914 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. It involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 99 wins and 53 losses. They went on to face the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series, which they lost in four straight games.

After the season, Connie Mack sold his best players off to other teams due to his frustration with the Federal League. The A's would then post seven consecutive last place finishes in the American League and would not win another pennant until 1929.

1916 Major League Baseball season

The 1916 Major League Baseball season.

1918 New York Yankees season

The 1918 New York Yankees season was the 17th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 60–63, finishing 13.5 games behind the American League champion Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1919 New York Yankees season

The 1919 New York Yankees season was the 17th season for the Yankees in New York and its 19th overall. The team finished with a record of 80–59, 7½ games behind the American League champion Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1920 New York Yankees season

The 1920 New York Yankees season was the 18th season for the Yankees in New York and their 20th overall. The team finished with a record of 95–59, just 3 games behind the American League champion Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Home games were played at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees of 1920 were the first team in the history of Major League Baseball to have an attendance of more than one million fans.

1921 New York Yankees season

The 1921 New York Yankees season was the 19th season for the Yankees in New York and their 21st overall. The team finished with a record of 98–55, winning their first pennant in franchise history, winning the American League by 4½ games over the previous year's champion, the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1922 New York Yankees season

The 1922 New York Yankees season was the 20th season for the Yankees in New York and their 22nd overall. The team finished with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses, to win their second pennant in franchise history, by a single game over the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

In the 1922 World Series, the Yankees again lost to their landlords, the New York Giants, 4 games to none with one tied game. The final game of the Series was also the Yankees' final game as a tenant in the Polo Grounds. During the season, they had begun construction of their new home, Yankee Stadium, which would open in 1923.

1923 New York Yankees season

The 1923 New York Yankees season was the 23rd season for this American League franchise and its 21st season in New York. Manager Miller Huggins led the team to their third straight pennant with a 98–54 record, 16 games ahead of the second place Detroit Tigers. The Yankees moved into the now famous Yankee Stadium. In the 1923 World Series, they avenged their 1921 and 1922 losses by defeating the New York Giants in 6 games, 4 games to 2, and won their first World Series title.

1924 New York Yankees season

The 1924 New York Yankees season was the team's 22nd season in New York and its 24th overall. The team finished with a record of 89–63, finishing 2 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1926 New York Yankees season

The 1926 New York Yankees season was the team's 24th season in New York, and its 26th season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–63, winning their fourth pennant, finishing three games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost in 7 games to the St. Louis Cardinals, with the series ending with Babe Ruth being caught stealing second in the bottom of the 9th inning in game 7.

1930 Major League Baseball season

The 1930 Major League Baseball season.

1930 New York Yankees season

The 1930 New York Yankees season was their 28th season. The team finished with a record of 86–68, finishing 16 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Bob Shawkey. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

Jeff Tesreau

Charles Monroe "Jeff" Tesreau (March 5, 1888 – October 24, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player.

List of New York Yankees Opening Day starting pitchers

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in The Bronx, New York City, New York. They play in the American League East division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Yankees have used 57 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 110 seasons. Since the franchise's beginning in 1901, the 58 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 57 wins, 36 losses, 1 tie (57–36–1), and 17 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game. Although in modern baseball, ties are rare due to extra innings, in 1910, New York's Opening Game against the Boston Red Sox was declared a tie due to darkness – at the time, Hilltop Park had lacked adequate lighting.Whitey Ford, Ron Guidry, and Mel Stottlemyre hold the Yankees record for most Opening Day starts with seven. The other pitchers with three or more Opening Day starts for New York are CC Sabathia (6), Lefty Gomez (6), Red Ruffing (5), Jack Chesbro (4), Roger Clemens (4), Bob Shawkey (4), Ray Caldwell (3), Jimmy Key (3), Vic Raschi (3), and most recently Masahiro Tanaka (4). Jimmy Key holds the Yankee record for best Opening Day record with a perfect 3–0.On Opening Day, Yankee pitchers have a combined record of 35–12–1 when playing at home. Of those games, pitchers have a 1–0 record at Oriole Park, a 3–1–1 record at Hilltop Park, a 2–3 record from Polo Grounds, a 28–8 record at Yankee Stadium, and a 1–0 record at Shea Stadium. When on the road for Opening Day, Yankee pitchers have a combined record of 27–27.

During the 1901 and 1902 seasons, the franchise played in Baltimore as the "Baltimore Orioles". The franchise has Opening Day record of 1–1 as Baltimore. After their move to New York in 1903, the franchise was known as the New York Highlanders until 1912. As the Highlanders, they had a 6–3–1 Opening Day record. For seasons in which New York would later win the World Series, the starting pitchers have a 16–8 record.

List of New York Yankees managers

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in New York City, New York in the borough of The Bronx. The New York Yankees are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Yankees have won the World Series 27 times, more than any other MLB team. In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Since starting to play as the Baltimore Orioles (no relationship to the current Baltimore Orioles team) in 1901, the team has employed 35 managers. The current manager is Aaron Boone, the current general manager is Brian Cashman and the current owners are Hal and Hank Steinbrenner, who are sons of George Steinbrenner, who first bought the Yankees in 1973.

Newark Bears (International League)

The Newark Bears were a Minor League Baseball team in the International League, beginning in 1917 at the Double-A level. They played in the International League through the 1949 season, except for 1920 and part of the 1925 season. In the Bears' last four seasons in the International League (1946–1949), they were a Triple-A team, the highest classification in minor league baseball. They played their home games at Ruppert Stadium in what is now known as the Ironbound section of Newark; the stadium was demolished in 1967. The 1932, 1937, 1938, and 1941 Bears were recognized as being among the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.Players in the Bears' early years who had Major League careers include Eddie Rommel, who pitched for the International League Newark Bears in 1918 and 1919. Harry Baldwin played three seasons for the Newark Bears (1921–1923) before playing for the New York Giants. Fred Brainard, who also played for the New York Giants 1914–1916, later played for the Newark Bears between 1922–1924 and was the Bears' player-manager in 1923 and 1924. Other former Major League players who managed the Newark Bears include Hall of Fame members Walter Johnson in 1928 and player-manager Tris Speaker in 1929–1930.Newark was a hotbed of minor league baseball from the time of the formation of the Newark Indians in 1902, and the addition of the Newark Eagles of the Negro National Leagues in 1936. A Federal League team, the Newark Peppers, played in 1915.

in 1931 Jacob Ruppert bought the Newark Bears who played at Ruppert Stadium in Newark, New Jersey, and begin building the farm system for the Yankees. In 1937, as a farm club of the New York Yankees, the Bears featured one of the most potent lineups in baseball, including Charlie Keller, Joe Gordon, Spud Chandler and George McQuinn, among others. They won the pennant by 25½ games to become known as one of the greatest minor league teams of all time. Their legacy was ensured when, after trailing 3 games to 0, they won the last four games against the Columbus Red Birds of the American Association to capture the Junior World Series.

Following the 1949 season, the Bears moved to Springfield, Massachusetts. Their departure, and the departure of the Eagles a year before, left Newark without professional baseball for nearly 50 years, until the formation of the Atlantic League Bears (see above).

One of the Bears' players, veteran pitcher George Earl Toolson, was reassigned by the Yankees to the AA Binghamton Triplets for the 1950 season. He refused to report and sued, challenging baseball's reserve clause in Toolson v. New York Yankees, which went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices upheld the clause and baseball's antitrust exemption, 7–2.

Scranton Miners (baseball)

The Scranton Miners was the name of several minor league baseball clubs that existed in Scranton, Pennsylvania between 1886 and 1953.

The first Scranton Miners played in 1886 as the Scranton Indians a member of the Pennsylvania State League. The team played as the Miners in 1887, before jumping to the International League and playing as the Indians for the remainder of the season. In 1892, the name was revived again by a team in the Pennsylvania State League and until 1894. In 1895, the team played as the Scranton Coal Heavers. The third Scranton Miners team played in the Eastern League in 1896 and 1897. The Miners name was used again from 1899–1900 in the Atlantic League. The final incarnation of the Scranton team used the Miners' moniker from 1904–1953. The only exceptions were the years 1939–1943 and 1946–1951, when the team was known as the Scranton Red Sox. The 1946 Red Sox were recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.

Sigel, Pennsylvania

Sigel is an unincorporated community in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, United States. The community is located at the intersection of Pennsylvania Route 36 and Pennsylvania Route 949, 8 miles (13 km) north of Brookville. Sigel has a post office with ZIP code 15860, which opened on May 26, 1862.

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