Bob Seeds

Ira Robert Seeds (February 24, 1907 – October 28, 1993) was an American professional baseball player who played outfielder in the Major Leagues from 1930-1940. He would play for the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, New York Giants, New York Yankees, and Boston Red Sox. The well-traveled player was known by the nickname "Suitcase".[1] (Another theory of the origin of the "suitcase" nickname states that he earned the moniker due to his large, "suitcase-like" feet).[2]

Seeds was a member of the 1937 Newark Bears, a farm team of the New York Yankees, known as one of the greatest seasons for a minor league team of all time. Seeds batted .303 with 20 home runs in 1937, and led the Bears with 112 runs batted in.[3] During one weekend of the season, Seeds hit 7 home runs in 10 at-bats, while driving in 17 runs.[1]

In 615 games over 9 seasons in his major league career, Seeds posted a .277 batting average (537-for-1937) with 268 runs, 28 home runs and 233 RBI. He recorded a .974 fielding percentage.

Bob Seeds
Bob Seeds 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: February 24, 1907
Ringgold, Texas
Died: October 28, 1993 (aged 86)
Erick, Oklahoma
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 19, 1930, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1940, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.277
Home runs28
Runs batted in233
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ a b Roberts, Russell (1995). Discover the Hidden New Jersey. Rutgers University Press. p. 75. ISBN 0813522528.
  2. ^ James, Bill (2003). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Simon and Schuster. p. 157. ISBN 0743227220.
  3. ^ Mayer, Ronald A. (1994). The 1937 Newark Bears: A Baseball Legend. Rutgers University Press. pp. xi. ISBN 081352153X.

External links

1907 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1907 throughout the world.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1932 Chicago White Sox season

The 1932 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 32nd season in the major leagues, and their 33rd season overall. They finished with a record 49–102, good enough for seventh place in the American League, 56.5 games behind the first place New York Yankees. The 1932 season was their worst ever (by winning percentage).

1932 Cleveland Indians season

The 1932 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 87–65, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1933 Boston Red Sox season

The 1933 Boston Red Sox season was the 33rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 63 wins and 86 losses. There were five rainouts, one against the Senators and a four game series against the Chicago White Sox that was cancelled due to the remnants of the 1933 Outer Banks hurricane, which passed to the southeast of New England the third weekend of September.

1934 Boston Red Sox season

The 1934 Boston Red Sox season was the 34th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 76 losses.

1934 Cleveland Indians season

The 1934 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 85–69, 16 games behind the Detroit Tigers.

1934 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world.

1936 New York Yankees season

The 1936 New York Yankees season was the team's 34th season in New York and its 36th season overall. The team finished with a record of 102–51, winning their 8th pennant, finishing 19.5 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 6 games.

1938 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1938 New York Giants season was the franchise's 56th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 83-67 record, 5 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1938 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1938 throughout the world.

1939 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1939 New York Giants season was the franchise's 57th season. The team finished in fifth place in the National League with a 77–74 record, 18½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1940 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1940 New York Giants season was the franchise's 58th season. The team finished in sixth place in the National League with a 72-80 record, 37½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

Bob Weiland

Robert George Weiland (December 14, 1905 – November 9, 1988) was a professional baseball pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1928-1940. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, and St. Louis Cardinals.

Boston Red Sox all-time roster

The following is a list of players, past and present, who have appeared in at least one competitive game for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (founded in 1908), known previously as the Boston Americans (1901–07).

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Non-US players are indicated by the appropriate flag.

International League Hall of Fame

The International League Hall of Fame is an American baseball hall of fame which honors players, managers, and executives of the International League (IL). It was created by the International League Baseball Writers' Association in 1947 to honor those individuals who made significant contributions to the league. The Hall of Fame inducted its first class of nine former players, managers, and league officials in 1947. A plaque was unveiled at the IL's New York City offices located in the Ruppert Building at 535 Fifth Avenue. Today, the plaque has no permanent home, but exists as a traveling display which visits a number of the league's ballparks each season.From 1949 through 1960, the league inducted up to three new members each year. Only one member was inducted annually from 1961 to 1963. After the cessation of the league's Baseball Writers' Association, the Hall of Fame became dormant from 1964 to 2006. The Hall was reestablished in 2007 to commemorate the League's 125th season of play in 2008. Two new members were inducted in 2007, and plans were made to elect up to 28, 14, and 7 inductees, respectively, over the next three years. Since 2011, up to three inductees have been voted into the Hall annually. As of 2019, 126 individuals have been inducted into the International League Hall of Fame.

Johnny Hodapp

Urban John Hodapp (September 26, 1905 – June 14, 1980) was an American professional baseball player in the 1920s and 1930s, mostly for the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball (MLB). He primarily played second base, and was a solid contact hitter, with a .311 batting average over nine major league seasons.

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