Bob Hyland

Robert Joseph Hyland (born July 21, 1945 in White Plains, New York) is a former American football guard who played eleven seasons in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Chicago Bears, New York Giants, and the New England Patriots. He played college football at Boston College and was drafted in the first round (ninth overall) of the 1967 NFL Draft. He played high school football at Archbishop Stepinac (Class of 1963).

Hyland owned the now-defunct Sports Page pub and Sports Page in White Plains, New York.[1]

In March 2011, Hyland ran as the Republican candidate for mayor of White Plains, New York,[2] in the wake of mayor Adam Bradley's resignation.[3] He was defeated by Thomas Roach.

Bob Hyland
Born:July 21, 1945 (age 73)
White Plains, New York
Career information
Position(s)Guard
CollegeBoston College
NFL draft1967 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
As player
1967–1969Green Bay Packers
1970Chicago Bears
1971–1975New York Giants
1976Green Bay Packers
1977New England Patriots
Career stats

References

  1. ^ http://www.lohud.com/story/money/business/2017/04/07/hylands-sports-page-closes/100200350/
  2. ^ Pellegrin, Michael. "Republicans Announce Hyland as Their Candidate for Mayor", White Plains Patch, March 13, 2011
  3. ^ Sciortino, Dina. "A Brief on Tuesday’s City Meetings", White Plains Patch, March 1, 2011
1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

1968 Green Bay Packers season

The 1968 Green Bay Packers season was their 50th season overall and the 48th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–7–1 record under first-year head coach Phil Bengston, earning them a third-place finish in the Central Division of the Western Conference. It was also the Packers' first losing season since 1958.

1969 Green Bay Packers season

The 1969 Green Bay Packers season was their 51st season overall and their 49th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under coach Phil Bengtson, earning them a 3rd-place finish in the Central division.

1970 Chicago Bears season

The 1970 Chicago Bears season was their 51st regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record, another below .500 showing, but a significant improvement over their 1–13 record of the previous season.

1971 New York Giants season

The 1971 New York Giants season was the franchise's 47th season in the National Football League (NFL). The Giants had a 4–10 record for the season and finished in last place in the National Football Conference East Division.The Giants selected Rocky Thompson in the 1971 NFL Draft, with the 18th overall pick. After a winless preseason, New York began the regular season with a 2–1 record before posting a 2–9 mark in its final 11 games. The team was affected by numerous injuries, including a thigh injury suffered by running back Ron Johnson, who had gained more than 1,000 yards rushing in 1970. The 1971 season was the last for quarterback Fran Tarkenton with the Giants; after he requested a trade, the Giants dealt him to the Minnesota Vikings in 1972 for three players and a pair of draft picks.

1972 New York Giants season

The 1972 New York Giants season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League (NFL). The Giants had an 8–6 record and finished in third place in the National Football Conference East Division, three games behind the Washington Redskins.The Giants had two first-round selections in the 1972 NFL Draft, and chose Eldridge Small and Larry Jacobson with the 17th and 24th overall picks, respectively. Before the season, New York traded their starting quarterback, Fran Tarkenton, to the Minnesota Vikings for a package of players and draft picks that included quarterback Norm Snead, who led the league in pass completion average in 1972. The Giants lost twice to open the season, but went on a four-game winning streak afterwards. In their 11th game, the Giants defeated the Philadelphia Eagles 62–10, setting the franchise record for the most points scored in a game; it was also an Eagles record for the most points allowed. The victory put the team at 7–4 and in contention for a playoff berth. Two losses ended their postseason chances, but New York beat the Dallas Cowboys in the final game of the season to finish with 8 wins in 14 games. Halfback Ron Johnson scored nine touchdowns on running plays to top the NFL, and his 1,182 rushing yards broke the Giants' single-season record. This was the last winning season for the Giants until 1981.

1973 New York Giants season

The 1973 New York Giants season was the franchise's 49th season in the National Football League. The season saw the Giants attempting to improve on their 8–6 record from 1972. However, the Giants suffered one of the worst seasons in franchise history, winning only two games, while losing eleven, and tying one. The two wins were against the Houston Oilers and the St. Louis Cardinals while the tie was against archrival Philadelphia, in what turned out to be the last game the Giants would ever play at Yankee Stadium before playing their final five home games at the Yale Bowl in Connecticut. They moved to Shea Stadium in 1975 and to Giants Stadium in 1976. The two wins by the Giants equalled the second fewest the team had ever posted in any season and it was their worst season since a 1–12–1 record in 1966. After the season, head coach Alex Webster was fired and replaced the following season by Bill Arnsparger.

1974 New York Giants season

The 1974 New York Giants season was the franchise's 50th season in the National Football League. The Giants finished in last place in the National Football Conference East Division with a 2–12 record, the team's worst since 1966.The Giants’ home venue in 1974 was the Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut, and they were winless at home in seven games. They won only one of twelve games at the Yale Bowl in 1973 and 1974. The Giants played at Shea Stadium in Queens in 1975 and opened Giants Stadium in New Jersey in October 1976.

1975 New York Giants season

The 1975 New York Giants season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League. The Giants finished with a 5–9 record that was nonetheless a three-win improvement upon their performance at the Yale Bowl in 1974. They had a new logo on their helmet, replacing the old lower case “ny” to a stylized white and blue uppercase “NY”.

1976 Green Bay Packers season

The 1976 Green Bay Packers season was their 58th season overall and their 56th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–9 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers struggled, and finished in last place in the NFC Central with a 5-9 record, as the Quarterback position began to resemble a revolving door, as Lynn Dickey became the latest young Quarterback to struggle with Interceptions.

1977 New England Patriots season

The 1977 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 8th season in the National Football League and 18th overall. The Patriots ended the season with a record of nine wins and five losses, and finished third in the AFC East Division.

Archbishop Stepinac High School

Archbishop Stepinac High School is an all-boys Roman Catholic high school in White Plains, New York, that was operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York until the 2009–2010 school year when it became independent. It was founded in 1948 and named for Aloysius Stepinac, the Archbishop of Zagreb in Croatia, which was then part of Yugoslavia. In 1952, Stepinac was appointed a cardinal by Pope Pius XII.

Bennie McRae

Benjamin Prince "Bennie" McRae (December 8, 1939 - November 22, 2012) was an American football player. A native of Newport News, Virginia, McRae played college football as a halfback at the University of Michigan from 1959 to 1961 and professional football, principally as a cornerback, for 10 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Chicago Bears (1962-1970) and New York Giants (1971).

Christopher Stone (actor)

Christopher Stone (born Thomas Edward Bourassa; October 4, 1942 – October 20, 1995) was an American actor.

Elijah Pitts

Elijah Eugene Pitts (February 3, 1938 – July 10, 1998) was an American football player, a halfback in the National Football League for eleven seasons, ten with the Green Bay Packers. Late in his career, he briefly played for the Los Angeles Rams and New Orleans Saints. Pitts was an assistant coach in the league for over two decades, most notably as the assistant head coach of the Buffalo Bills.

List of Boston College Eagles in the NFL draft

This is a list of Boston College Eagles football players in the NFL draft.

List of Chicago Bears first-round draft picks

The Chicago Bears are an American football franchise based in Chicago, Illinois. They are members of the National Football Conference (NFC) North division in the National Football League (NFL). They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Joe Stydahar, a tackle from West Virginia University. Stydahar went to have a stellar career with the franchise and is inducted in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The team's most recent first round selection (2018) was Roquan Smith, an inside linebacker from Georgia. The Bears have not had first round selections a total of six times, most recently in 2010. The Bears have only selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing Tom Harmon in 1941 and Bob Fenimore in 1947. The team's six selections from the University of Texas are the most chosen by the Bears from one program. Nine of the first round selections have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The NFL Draft, as a whole, gives the advantage to the teams that did poorly the previous season. The 30 teams that did not make the Super Bowl are ranked in order so the team with the worst record picks first and the team with the best record pick last. The two exceptions to this inverse order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion selects 32nd overall, and the Super Bowl loser selects 31st overall. If the franchise so chooses, they may trade their draft picks for any combination of draft picks, players, and money.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

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