Bob Geigel

Robert Frederick Geigel (October 1, 1924 – October 30, 2014) was an American professional wrestling promoter and professional wrestler. He operated the Kansas City, Missouri-based Heart of America Sports Attractions promotion from 1963 to 1986, and served three terms as the president of the National Wrestling Alliance from 1978 to 1980, 1982 to 1985, and 1986 to 1987.

Bob Geigel
BobGeigel2009Cropped
Geigel in April 2009
Born
Robert Frederick Geigel

October 1, 1924
Algona, Iowa, United States
DiedOctober 30, 2014 (aged 90)
Kansas City, Missouri, United States
Cause of deathAlzheimer's disease[1]
NationalityAmerican
Alma materUniversity of Iowa
OccupationPromoter, professional wrestler, Seabee
OrganizationNWA Central States (1963–1986)
Spouse(s)
Vera June Lackender
(m. 1947; his death 2014)
[2]
Children3[2]
Ring name(s)A-Bomber[1]
Bob Geigel[1]
Billed height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)[1]
Billed weight220 lb (100 kg; 16 st)[1]
Billed fromAlgona, Iowa
Trained byAlphonse Bisignano[1]
Debut1950[1][3]
Retired1976[1][3]

Early life

Geigel was born on October 1, 1924, in Algona, Iowa[2] to Frederick Samuel and Leota May Geigel. He attended Algona High School, graduating in 1942. After graduating, Geigel enlisted in the United States Navy. He served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of World War II as a Seabee.[4][2]

After leaving the Navy, Geigel began studying in the University of Iowa in 1946. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in physical education. Geigel was a champion amateur wrestler during his college years, coming in third place during the 1948 NCAA Championships in the 191 pounds (87 kg) weight division.[3][4][5]

Professional wrestling career

Geigel was recruited into professional wrestling by Alphonse Bisigniano.[4] He debuted in 1950 in Texas.[3] Wrestling primarily in Pinkie George's Midwest Wrestling Association out of Kansas City, and also in Amarillo, Texas, Geigel generally played the part of the "heel" or antagonist.[4] He became a full-time professional wrestler in 1952.[5] Though he was generally introduced as being from Algona, Iowa, he was billed as "Texas" Bob Geigel.[6] He also wrestled as A-Bomber while working under a mask in Amarillo.

Geigel frequently held tag team championships in his home promotion, holding the NWA Central States World Tag Team Championship four times,[7] and the NWA North American Tag Team Championship (Central States version) nine times.[8][9] Geigel had a long-standing feud with former tag team partner Bob Brown in Kansas City.[3] He officially retired from the ring in 1976, but continued to wrestle sporadically in the 1980s.[6][3]

Promoting career

Geigel became a promoter in 1963, when he took over management of the Kansas City office. Partnering with Gus Karras and Pat O'Connor, he renamed the promotion Heart of America Sports Attractions.[5] He then took his place on the board of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). In that same year, Geigel was cited as a co-defendant in an anti-monopoly case brought against the Central States territory by previous owner Pinkie George. Along with his partners Karras and O'Connor, and fellow co-defendant George Simpson, he refuted the charge, and it was eventually dropped.[4]

In 1978, Geigel became President of the NWA, his first term lasting until 1980. During this term he strongly supported Harley Race, a part-owner of Heart of America, as NWA World Heavyweight Champion.[4] Geigel and Race bought out Sam Muchnick's portion of the St. Louis Wrestling Club,[4] a cornerstone territory of the NWA. Geigel served a second and third term as NWA President from 1982 to 1985 and 1986 to 1987.[5] He retired from promoting wrestling in 1988.[3]

Geigel sold Heart of America Sports Attractions to Jim Crockett Jr. in September 1986. He repurchased the promotion in February 1987 but closed it in 1988.

Personal life

Geigel owned a bar in Kansas City called The Tender Trap.[10] Geigel worked security at a racetrack in Kansas City after retiring from wrestling, until suffering a broken hip in early 2014.[3][10] Geigel met his wife Vera at the University of Iowa, and they were married for more than 65 years.[10] They had three daughters.[5]

Death

He suffered from Alzheimer's disease.[3] Geigel died on October 30, 2014, in a nursing home in Kansas City.[3][10]

Championships and accomplishments

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Bob Geigel". Cagematch.net. Retrieved December 3, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d "Robert Geigel". LentzFuneralHome.com. 2014. Retrieved December 3, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Smith, Tom (October 31, 2014). "Wrestler Bob Geigel was at the heart of the Kansas City wrestling scene". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Tim Hornbaker (2007). National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling. ECW Press. ISBN 978-1-55022-741-3.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Nation, Ryan (April 19, 2007). "A lifetime of rewards for Bob Geigel". Slam! Sports. Canadian Online Explorer. Retrieved December 10, 2009.
  6. ^ a b Kendall, Justin (October 30, 2014). "Bob Geigel, former NWA president and pro wrestler, has died at age 90". The Pitch. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  7. ^ a b NWA World Tag Team Championship (Central States) at Wrestling-Titles.com
  8. ^ a b Royal Duncan and Gary Will (2006). "(Kansas and Western Missouri) West Missouri: North American Tag Team Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 253. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4.
  9. ^ a b "NWA North American Tag Team Title (Central States version)". wrestling-titles.com. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  10. ^ a b c d Oliver, Greg (October 30, 2014). "Bob Geigel was a man's man". Slam! Sports. Canadian Online Explorer. Retrieved November 18, 2014.

See also

External links

Preceded by
Edward Gossett
President of the National Wrestling Alliance
1978–1980
Succeeded by
Jim Crockett, Jr.
Preceded by
Jim Crockett, Jr.
President of the National Wrestling Alliance
1982–1985
Succeeded by
Jim Crockett, Jr.
Preceded by
Jim Crockett, Jr.
President of the National Wrestling Alliance
1986–1987
Succeeded by
Jim Crockett, Jr.
1976 in professional wrestling

1976 in professional wrestling describes the year's events in the world of professional wrestling.

AWA World Tag Team Championship

The American Wrestling Association (AWA) World Tag Team Championship was a professional wrestling world tag team championship in the American Wrestling Association from 1960 until the promotion folded in 1991.

Akio Sato (wrestler)

Akio Sato (佐藤 昭雄, Satō Akio, born February 13, 1953) is a retired professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the World Wrestling Federation as Sato, a member of The Orient Express.

Bart Sawyer

Steven Stewart (born November 30, 1965), known by his ring name Bart Sawyer, is an American retired professional wrestler, color commentator, and occasional actor. He is best known for his time in Championship Wrestling USA and the United States Wrestling Association during the 1990s. In his career, Sawyer also wrestled for Extreme Canadian Championship Wrestling, House of Pain Wrestling Federation, Memphis Wrestling, NWA Georgia, NWA Main Event, NWA Worldwide, World Xtreme Wrestling and W*ING. Additionally, he competed as a preliminary wrestler in World Championship Wrestling and the World Wrestling Federation.

Trained by Bob Geigel, Stewart began his professional wrestling career in the World Wrestling Alliance. He emerged as a popular "fan favorite" in Pacific Northwest Wrestling in the early-1990s, whose gimmick was modeled after Bart Simpson, and engaged in feuds with Al Madril, Colonel DeBeers, Matt Borne and Buddy Wayne. Sawyer later became a "rulebreaker" himself when he relocated to the Southern United States. Throughout his career, Sawyer won several championships including the Championship Wrestling USA Television Championship four times, the NWA Georgia Heavyweight Championship once, the NWA North American Tag Team Championship (with Chris Michaels), and the USWA World Tag Team Championship (with Doug Masters and Flex Kavana) three times. He was forced to retire in 2004, following a mild stroke, after nearly 18 years in the ring.

Boris Malenko

Lawrence J. Simon (June 28, 1933 – September 1, 1994), better known by the ring name, Boris Malenko (Russian: Бори́с Маленко́, tr. pron, IPA: [bɐˈrʲis mɐlˈɛnko]), was an American professional wrestler and professional wrestling trainer. He is best known for his appearances with Championship Wrestling from Florida and Big Time Wrestling in the 1960s and 1970s as a Russian heel. He is the father of professional wrestlers Joe Malenko and Dean Malenko.

Curtis Hughes

Curtis Hughes (born December 7, 1964) is an American professional wrestler, better known under the ring name Mr. Hughes. He is best known for his stints in World Championship Wrestling and the World Wrestling Federation. He also worked on TV for the American Wrestling Association, the American Wrestling Federation and Extreme Championship Wrestling. He trained wrestlers at WWA4 wrestling school for more than 10 years and wrestles on the independent circuit.

Dory Funk

Dorrance Wilhelm Funk (May 4, 1919 – June 3, 1973) was an American professional wrestler. He is the father of wrestlers Dory Funk Jr. and Terry Funk, and was a promoter of the Amarillo, Texas-based Western States Sports promotion.

Freddie Sweetan

Freddie Prosser (July 28, 1938 - July 26, 1974) was a Canadian professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Freddie Sweetan. He competed in certain North American regional promotions including the National Wrestling Alliance as well as Grand Prix Wrestling, Maple Leaf Wrestling and Stampede Wrestling during the 1960s and 1970s, most notably teaming with Paul Peller as the masked tag team The Butchers.

Hard Boiled Haggerty

Don Stansauk (April 2, 1925 – January 27, 2004) was an American professional wrestler and actor, known by his ring name, Hard Boiled Haggerty. He was previously a professional American football player, and became a successful character actor after his wrestling career.

Heart of America Sports Attractions

Heart of America Sports Attractions, also known as the Midwest Wrestling Association, Central States Wrestling and the World Wrestling Alliance, was an American professional wrestling promotion that ran shows mainly in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa. Due to the promotion's main office and base of operations being in Kansas City, Missouri the territory was often referred to simply as "Kansas City". The promotion existed from July 1948 until it closed in 1988. The territory was one of the original territories of the National Wrestling Alliance with two of the six "founding fathers" of the NWA (Paul "Pinkie" George and Orville Brown) promoting in it.

Jim Crockett Jr.

James Allen Crockett Jr. (born August 10, 1944) is a former professional wrestling promoter. From 1973 to 1988, he owned Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP), a wrestling company affiliated with the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). From 1976 to 1987, he also owned the Charlotte Orioles, a minor league baseball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. Crockett owned the Winston-Salem Polar Twins in the Southern Hockey League from 1975 to 1977.

NWA Central States Heavyweight Championship

The NWA Central States Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship that currently serves as the main title for the National Wrestling Alliance promotion, NWA Central-States Championship Wrestling. For most of its existence, however, the title was defended in the NWA affiliate Central States Wrestling from 1950 to 1989.

NWA North American Tag Team Championship (Central States version)

The Heart of America Sports Attractions, or "NWA Central States" version of the NWA North American Tag Team Championship was a secondary Tag team championship promoted by the Heart of America Sports Attraction promotion, a National Wrestling Alliance territory based out of Kansas City, Missouri and was defended in Missouri, Kanasas and the surrounding states. The Championship was active from 1963 until 1973, originally designed to be a replacement for the NWA Central States Tag Team Championship and after 10 years was replaced with the Central States version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship. Because the championship was a professional wrestling championship, it was not won or lost competitively but instead by the decision of the bookers of a wrestling promotion. The championship was awarded after the chosen team "won" a match to maintain the illusion that professional wrestling is a competitive sport.Documentation shows that a total of 44 individuals formed 39 different teams for a total of 58 Championship reigns, possibly more as there are periods where the championship history was not clearly documented. The first champions were the team of Sonny Myers and Pat O'Connor and the final champions were Great Togo and Tokyo Joe. With Togo and Joe's victory the NWA North American Tag Team Championship was immediately replaced with the Central States version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship. Due to the replacement Togo and Joe's reign is the shorted with 0 minutes. The longest team reign was 267 as "Bulldog" Bob Brown and Bob Geigel held the championship from September 22, 1966 until June 16, 1967. Brown and Geigel are the team with the most reigns, five in total and Bob Geigel is the person with the most individual reigns, twelve in total.

NWA World Tag Team Championship (Amarillo version)

The Amarillo version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship was the main tag team professional wrestling championship for the Amarillo, Texas-based Western States Sports, a member of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). Promoters Doc Sarpolis and Dory Funk introduced the championship in 1955 and continued to use it as their main tag team championship until 1969. The NWA Board of Directors dictated that there would be only one NWA World Heavyweight Champion but allowed any NWA member, also known as a NWA territory, to create its own local version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship. In 1957 no less than 13 different versions of the NWA World Tag Team Championship were promoted across the United States.[Championships] This even included another version in East Texas, which was used mainly in Houston and Fort Worth at the time.To start the Amarillo lineage of the NWA World Tag Team Championship. Sarpolis and Funk invited Reggie Lisowski and Art Nelson, the holders of the Chicago version of the championship, to come to Amarillo and defend the championship. By November 1955 Lisowski stopped travelling to Amarillo so Nelson was given Rip Rogers as a partner, creating a separate lineage from the Chicago version as they continued to recognize Lisowski and Nelson as champions. The world tag team championship was actively promoted in and around Amarillo and Lubbock, Texas, from 1955 until March 1969. At that point the promotion abandoned the championship, opting to create the NWA Western States Tag Team Championship as the main tag team championship of the territory. Since the Amarillo version, like all other NWA World Tag Team Championships, were professional wrestling championships, it meant that the championship was not determined by competitive combat, but instead based on a predetermined match result.The teams of Terry Funk and Dory Funk Jr., and Mike DiBiase and Danny Plechas, share the record for most reigns as a team, a total of three each. Art Nelson, one-half of the first championship team, held the title a total of eight times with various partners, the most of any individual. The Von Brauners' (Kurt Von Brauner and Karl Von Brauner) first reign lasted 140 days, the longest of any individual reign. The Von Brauners also hold the record for combined reigns as a team with a 166 days total for their two reigns. Individually, Nelson's eight reigns add up to at least 310 days, eclipsing any other wrestler. Due to incomplete records in regard to a number of championship changes, it is impossible to clearly identify the shortest reign; Great Bolo and Tokyo Joe's seven day reign in 1958 is the shortest confirmed reign.

NWA World Tag Team Championship (Central States version)

The Central States version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship was the main professional wrestling championship for tag teams in Heart of America Sports Attractions, later known as Central States Wrestling (CSW) from 1951 to 1959, then again from 1962 to 1963 and then finally from 1973 to 1979. CSW was a member of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA), whose bylaws allowed any of their members, referred to as NWA territories, to create their own version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship that would be promoted within their territory. The Central States version was primarily defended in CSW's home town of Kansas City and during their shows across Missouri, Kansas and Iowa. As it was a professional wrestling championship, it was not won or lost competitively but instead by the decision of the bookers. The title was awarded after the chosen team "wins" a match to maintain the illusion that professional wrestling is a competitive sport. In 1957 there were at least 13 different versions of the NWA World Tag Team Championship being promoted in various NWA territories across the United States.[Championships]The Battling Duseks (Emil Dusek and Joe Dusek) were the first NWA World Tag Team Champions in the Hearts of America promotion. Records do not indicate if the Duseks won a tournament or were simply awarded the championship by the promoters prior to being presented as champions on May 26, 1950. Joe and Ernie Dusek would later hold the championship as well as the combination of Emil and Ernie holding the championship twice before the championship was abandoned in 1960. From 1960 to 1962 the championship was inactive and instead the NWA Central States Tag Team Championship was recognized as the main tag team championship in the territory. On October 10, 1962 Pat O'Connor and Sonny Myers defeated Bob Geigel and Lee Hennig to win the NWA World Tag Team Champions as the promoters brought the championship back. The second era of the championship lasted for around two years until it was abandoned in lieu of the newly created NWA North American Tag Team Championship around 1963. In 1973 CSW abandoned the North American championship and brought the NWA World Tag Team Championship back. Great Togo and Tokyo Joe defeated Bob Geigel and Rufus R. Jones to win the vacant championship. In 1979 Central States Wrestling once again abandoned the championship to permanently adopt the NWA Central States Tag Team Championship as their top tag team championship. Bob Brown and Bob Sweetan were the last holders of the NWA World Tag Team Championship.Ernie and Joe Dusek teamed up to win a total of five tag team championships, the most of any team, followed by Emil and Ernie teaming up for a total of three championships as a unit. Ernie and Joe Dusek both held the championship a total of seven times, the most individual reigns. The longest reign of any of the three championships eras belongs to Ernie and Joe Dusek, who held the championship for at least 545 days from late 1956 to June 27, 1958. Due to lack of specific dates for many of the early championship changes it is impossible to clearly determine who had the shortest reign of any champion. The shortest confirmed reign was an eight-day reign for the team of Larry Hamilton and Sonny Myers from October 25 to November 8, 1956.

Ox Baker

Douglas A. Baker Sr. (April 19, 1934 – October 20, 2014) was an American professional wrestler and actor, better known professionally as Ox Baker. He was famous for his Machiavellian eyebrows and finishing move, the Heart Punch, sometimes called the "Hurt Punch", after Baker's famous catchphrase "I love to hurt people!". He appeared in several movies including Blood Circus and Escape from New York.

Rufus R. Jones

Carey L. Lloyd (July 4, 1933 – November 13, 1993), also known by his ring name Rufus R. "Freight Train" Jones, was an American professional wrestler who competed in the Central States and Mid-Atlantic regional promotions of the National Wrestling Alliance as well as the American Wrestling Association during the 1970s and 1980s.

Stan Holek

Stan Holek (April 4, 1933 – November 28, 2015) was a Canadian professional wrestler, better known by his ring names, Stan Lisowski and Stan Neilson. He became known for being part of two famous "brother" tag teams, the Lisowskis (with Reggie Lisowski) and the Neilsons (with Art Neilson).

World Wrestling Alliance

The World Wrestling Alliance is used by several regional and independent professional wrestling promotions, which include:

World Wrestling Alliance, a failed 1987 split from the National Wrestling Alliance formed by Kansas City-based Bob Geigel; see Heart of America Sports Attractions

World Wrestling Alliance (Massachusetts), an American independent promotion based in New England and founded by Mike Sparta and Brittany Brown

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