Bob Flowers

Robert C. Flowers (August 6, 1917 – December 8, 1962) was an American football player who played eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Bob Flowers
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:August 6, 1917
Big Spring, Texas
Died:December 8, 1962 (aged 45)
Big Spring, Texas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
College:Texas Tech
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR
1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1943 Green Bay Packers season

The 1943 Green Bay Packers season was their 25th overall and their 23rd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 7–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1944 Green Bay Packers season

The 1944 Green Bay Packers season was their 26th season overall and their 24th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season beating the New York Giants 14–7 in the NFL Championship Game, their sixth league title. Don Hutson led the NFL in touchdowns for a record-setting eighth time in his career.

1945 Green Bay Packers season

The 1945 Green Bay Packers season was their 27th season overall and their 25th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–4 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1946 Green Bay Packers season

The 1946 Green Bay Packers season was their 28th season overall and their 26th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–5 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1947 Green Bay Packers season

The 1947 Green Bay Packers season was their 29th season overall and their 27th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–5–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1948 Green Bay Packers season

The 1948 Green Bay Packers season was their 30th season overall and their 28th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–9 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a fourth-place finish in the Western Conference.

1949 Green Bay Packers season

The 1949 Green Bay Packers season was their 31st season overall and their 29th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 2–10 record under coach Curly Lambeau for a fifth-place finish in the Western Conference. This was the 31st and final season the Packers played under Lambeau, who resigned and then coached the Chicago Cardinals in 1950 and 1951 and the Washington Redskins in 1952 and 1953.

The 1949 season was also the final year for blue and gold jerseys, as the Packers switched to kelly green and yellow in 1950 under new coach Gene Ronzani, a graduate of Marquette University.

Flowers (name)

Flowers is a surname. Notable persons with that name include:

A. D. Flowers (1917–2001), American visual effects artist

Adam Flowers, American singer

Adrian Flowers (1926–2016), British photographer

Alfred K. Flowers (born 1947), United States Air Force officer

April Flowers (dancer), American exotic dancer

Ben Flowers (1927–2009), American baseball pitcher who played for several major league teams

Bernie Flowers (1930–2011), American footballer

Bess Flowers (1898–1984), American actress

Betty Sue Flowers, American academic and writer

Bill Flowers (born 1963), Australian artist

Bob Flowers (1917–1962), American footballer

Brandon Flowers (born 1981), American musician, lead singer of the band The Killers

Brandon Flowers (American football) (born 1986), defensive back for the San Diego Chargers football team

Brian Flowers, Baron Flowers (1924–2010), British physicist

Bruce Flowers (born 1957), American former basketball player

Buck Flowers (1899–1983), American footballer

Charlie Flowers (born 1937), American former American footballer

Chipman L. Flowers, Jr. (born 1974), American politician

Christine Flowers (born 1960), American singer and actor

Curtis Flowers, American murderer

Dick Flowers (1927–2010), American footballer

Dickie Flowers (1850–1892), American baseballer

Dimitri Flowers (born 1996), American football player

Danny Flowers (born 1948), American musician

Don Flowers (1908–1968), American cartoonist

Erik Flowers (born 1978), American former American footballer

Frank E. Flowers (born 1979), Caymanian filmmaker

Frederick Flowers (1810–1886), English police magistrate

Gennifer Flowers (born 1950), American model and actress

George Flowers (politician) (1879–1958), Australian politician

George Flowers (footballer) (1907–1991), English footballer

George French Flowers (1811–1872), English composer

Grandmaster Flowers (died 1992), American disc jockey

H.H. Flowers (born 1865), American politician

Herbie Flowers (born 1938), English musician

J. Christopher Flowers (born 1957), American investor

Jacob Flowers, 19th century American settler

Jackie Flowers (born 1958), American former American footballer

Jake Flowers (1902–1962), American baseballer, played for Cardinals and others

Jason Flowers (born 1975), British rugby coach and former player

Jewel Flowers (1923–2006), American model

John Flowers (disambiguation), multiple people

Keith Flowers (1930–1993), American football player

Kenny Flowers (born 1964), American former American footballer

Kim Flowers, American actress

Lannie Flowers, American musician

Larry Flowers (disambiguation), multiple people

Lethon Flowers (born 1973), American former American footballer

Marquis Flowers, American footballer

Mary E. Flowers (born 1951), American politician

Michael Flowers (disambiguation), several people

Ness Flowers, Welsh former rugby player

Nina Flowers (born 1974), Puerto Rican drag queen, disc jockey and make-up artist

Pat Flowers (1917–2000), American jazzer

Paul Flowers (banker) (born 1950), former minister, councillor, and director of the Co-operative Bank

Paul Flowers (footballer) (born 1974), English footballer

Percy Flowers (1903–1982), American farmer and alcohol producer

Quinton Flowers (born 1994), American football player

R. Barri Flowers, American author

Richmond Flowers (disambiguation), multiple people

Robert B. Flowers, United States Army officer

Robert Lee Flowers (1870–1951), American university administrator

Ron Flowers (born 1934), English footballer who won 49 caps for England, played for Wolverhampton Wanderers

Ron Flowers (American football) coach

Rudolph Flowers (born 1980), Belize footballer

Ruth Flowers (born 1940), British disc jockey

Sibby Flowers (born 1963), American former weightlifter

Stephanie Flowers (born c. 1953), American politician

Stephen Flowers (born 1953), American writer

Tairia Flowers (born 1981), American softballer

Thomas Flowers (disambiguation), multiple people

Thomas Harold Flowers (1905–1998), a British engineer

Tiger Flowers (1895–1927), American boxer

Tim Flowers (born 1967), English goalkeeper, played for Blackburn, Southampton and England

Tommy Flowers (1905–1998), British engineer and computer designer

Tre Flowers (born 1995), American football player

Tyler Flowers (born 1986), American baseballer

Vic Flowers, English cricket supporter

Vivian Flowers (born c. 1969), African-American member of the Arkansas House of Representatives

Vonetta Flowers (born 1973), American bobsledder

Walter Flowers (1933–1984), American politician

Wayland Flowers (1939–1988), American puppeteer

Wes Flowers (1913–1988), American baseballer

Wilfred Flowers (1856–1926), English cricketer

Woodie Flowers (born 1943), American engineer

List of sportspeople educated at Texas Tech University

Texas Tech University, often referred to as Texas Tech or TTU, is a public, coeducational, research university located in Lubbock, Texas. Established on February 10, 1923, and originally known as Texas Technological College, the university is the leading institution of the Texas Tech University System and has the seventh largest student body in the state of Texas. It is the only school in Texas to house an undergraduate institution, law school, and medical school at the same location. Initial enrollment in 1925 was 910 students; as of fall 2010, the university has 31,637 students from more than 110 countries, all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Since the university's first graduating class in 1927 of 26 students, Texas Tech has awarded more than 220,000 degrees, including 47,000 graduate and professional degrees to its alumni. The Texas Tech Alumni Association, with over 27,000 members, operates more than 120 chapters in cities throughout the United States and the world.Since 1996, Texas Tech University has sponsored fifteen varsity teams that compete in nine sports: American football, baseball, basketball, cross country running, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track and field, and volleyball. When the university opened for 1925–26 academic year, three varsity teams, baseball, men's basketball, and football, were fielded during that season. Gene Alford, who began playing for the Portsmouth Spartans in 1931, was the first Texas Tech alumni to play in a professional league. Many more Texas Tech alumni have become professional athletes and coaches in sports leagues including Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), and the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA).

Several Texas Tech Red Raiders have been honored for both their collegiate, and professional achievements. Collegiality, six position awards have been awarded to seven Red Raiders. The Doak Walker Award, honoring the top college football running back, was presented to Bam Morris in 1993 and Byron Hanspard in 1996. The Sammy Baugh Trophy, honoring the top college football passer, was presented to Kliff Kingsbury in 2002, B. J. Symons in 2003, and Graham Harrell in 2007. Harrell also received the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, honoring the most outstanding senior quarterback in college football, in 2008. Wes Welker received the Mosi Tatupu Award, presented to the special teams player of the year from 1997 to 2006, in 2003. In 2007, Michael Crabtree received the Fred Biletnikoff Award and Paul Warfield Award, honoring the top college football receiver. The following season, Crabtree received both awards again, becoming the only player to win either award more than once. Four Red Raiders, Donny Anderson, Hub Bechtol, E. J. Holub, and Dave Parks, have been named to the College Football Hall of Fame. Three-time Olympic Gold Medalist and three-time WNBA Most Valuable Player Sheryl Swoopes, was the first player signed by the WNBA. Professionally, football coaches Carl Madison and John Parchman were named High School Football Coach of the Year by USA Today in 1988 and 1999 respectively.

Northwest African American Museum

The Northwest African American Museum (NAAM) serves to present and preserve the connections between the Pacific Northwest and people of African descent and investigate and celebrate Black experiences in America through exhibitions, programs and events. The museum is located in Seattle, Washington's historically African-American Central District neighborhood in the former Colman School (built 1909, with official status as a City of Seattle landmark). The building also contains 36 units of affordable housing.

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