Bob Dolman

Robert "Bob" Dolman (born October 28, 1949) is a Canadian screenwriter, actor, director and producer.

His work in television includes SCTV, SCTV Network 90, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Among his film credits are the screenplays for Willow and Far and Away, as well as The Banger Sisters and How to Eat Fried Worms, both of which he also directed.

Bob was married at one time to actress Andrea Martin. His late sister, Nancy Dolman, was also an actress, as well as the wife of comedian/actor/screenwriter/producer Martin Short.

Filmography

External links

A. Whitney Brown

Alan Whitney Brown (born July 8, 1952) is an American writer and comedian best known for work on Saturday Night Live in the 1980s. In addition to writing for the program, he appeared opposite Dennis Miller in a biting satirical Weekend Update commentary segment called "The Big Picture." He won a 1988 Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program, along with Al Franken, Tom Davis, Phil Hartman, Mike Myers, Lorne Michaels and Conan O'Brien. He was also one of the original correspondents on Comedy Central's The Daily Show from 1996 to 1998.

Adam Resnick

Adam Resnick is an American comedy writer from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He is best known for his work writing for Late Night with David Letterman.Additionally, Resnick co-created and wrote for Get A Life with Chris Elliott. Resnick also wrote and was co-executive producer of a season of The Larry Sanders Show for HBO. Two years later, in 1994, Resnick would team up with Elliott again for the motion picture Cabin Boy.

In 2000, Resnick wrote the film Lucky Numbers starring John Travolta and Lisa Kudrow.

In 2002, Resnick wrote the film Death to Smoochy which was directed by Danny DeVito.

Resnick also created and wrote the 1996 HBO television series The High Life.

In 2014, his book, Will Not Attend, was released.

Andrea Martin

Andrea Louise Martin (born January 15, 1947) is an American-Canadian actress, singer, author and comedian, best known for her work in the television series SCTV and Great News. She has appeared in films such as Black Christmas (1974), Wag the Dog (1997), Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001), My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002) and My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (2016). She has also lent her voice to the animated films Anastasia (1997), The Rugrats Movie (1998) and Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius (2001) and Little Italy (2018).

Martin has been equally prolific in the world of theater, winning Tony Awards for both My Favorite Year and the 2013 revival of Pippin. Martin also appeared on Broadway in Candide, Oklahoma!, Fiddler on the Roof, Young Frankenstein, Exit the King and Act One. She has received five nominations for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, more than any other actress in the award's history. She received her first nomination for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for the 2016 revival of Noises Off.

She also starred as Carol Wendelson on the NBC sitcom Great News.

Bonnie and Terry Turner

Bonnie and Terry Turner are American screenwriters and producers, best known for creating the sitcoms 3rd Rock from the Sun (1996–2001) and That '70s Show (1998–2006), for NBC and FOX respectively, as well as That '80s Show for FOX in 2002, and Normal, Ohio starring John Goodman in 2000.

From 1986 until 1992, the team were staff writers for Saturday Night Live.Between 1987 and 1995, they were responsible for authoring or screenwriting six films, including Coneheads, Wayne's World, Wayne's World 2, Tommy Boy, and The Brady Bunch Movie.

Brian McConnachie

Brian McConnachie (born December 23, 1942) is an American actor, comedy writer, and children's book author. In 1982, he won an Emmy Award as part of the writing team for SCTV Network, and in 1979 he was nominated for an Emmy as part of the writing team for Saturday Night Live.

During the early 1970s, he was one of the main writers for National Lampoon, where he authored and co-authored many articles. He left the magazine after four years, but as Rick Meyerowitz commented in the book Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead in 2010,

"...[McConnachie's Lampoon work] is well loved, here on Earth, and on his home planet."

As an actor, McConnachie has appeared in 15 films. As a television writer, in addition to SCTV Network and Saturday Night Live, he has also written one episode of Noddy and eighteen of Shining Time Station.

David Odell

David Odell is an American screenwriter and film director.Odell was nominated in 1980 for an Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program for The Muppet Show alongside Jim Henson, Don Hinkley, and Jerry Juhl. He won the award the following year with co-nominees Jerry Juhl and Chris Langham.

Dolman (disambiguation)

Dolman is a garment.

Dolman may also refer to:

Bob Dolman

Charles Dolman

Claude Ernest Dolman

Dick Dolman

Eric Dolman

Evert Dolman

Fiona Dolman

Harry Dolman

John Dolman

John Dolman SJ

Liam Dolman

Malcolm Dolman

Nancy Dolman

Thomas Dolman

William Dolman

William George Dolman

Eddie Gorodetsky

Eddie Gorodetsky is a television writer and producer. His credits include Desert Bus, Mom, Two and a Half Men, Dharma & Greg, The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Mike & Molly, Saturday Night Live, SCTV Network 90, and Late Night with David Letterman. He has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, winning one.He was working at WBCN in Boston when he was discovered by the producers of Second City Television.

He has made Christmas compilations for over 20 years which he sends to friends and family which feature rare and obscure songs from a variety of genres. He released one commercially in the early 1990s: "Christmas Party with Eddie G."

He also produced Bob Dylan's weekly radio series, Theme Time Radio Hour, and appeared in Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette's documentary The Aristocrats.Gorodetsky co-created Mom, a TV series on CBS that premiered in 2013.

Far and Away

Far and Away is a 1992 American epic romantic adventure drama film directed by Ron Howard from a script by Howard and Bob Dolman. It stars Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. This was the last cinematography credit for Mikael Salomon before he moved onto a directing career, and the music score was done by John Williams. It was screened out of competition at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival.Cruise and Kidman play Irish immigrants seeking their fortune in 1890s America, eventually taking part in the Land Run of 1893.This was Cyril Cusack's final film before his death the following year.

George Yanok

George Yanok is an American screenwriter, television producer, actor, artist and jazz drummer.

Yanok produced the 1977 NBC situation comedy The Kallikaks.

How to Eat Fried Worms (film)

How to Eat Fried Worms is a 2006 American children's comedy film directed and written by Bob Dolman and produced by Mark Johnson and Philip Steuer with music by Mark Mothersbaugh and Robert Mothersbaugh. It is loosely based on Thomas Rockwell's 1973 children's book of the same name. It was also produced by Walden Media, and distributed by New Line Cinema.

Development began in 1998, and the theatrical release for the United States and Canada was August 25, 2006. The film stars Luke Benward, Adam Hicks, Hallie Eisenberg, Austin Rogers, Andrew Gillingham, Alexander Gould, Blake Garrett, and Philip Daniel Bolden. The film received mixed reviews from critics.

Jeff Martin (writer)

Jeff Summerlin Martin is an American television producer and writer. He originally wrote for The Simpsons during the second, third, fourth and fifth seasons, and eventually returned over 20 years later to write again for seasons 27 and 28. He attended Harvard University, where he wrote for The Harvard Lampoon, as have many other Simpsons writers. He left along with most of the original staff in 1993, and has since written for several TV shows, including Listen Up!, Baby Blues and Homeboys in Outer Space. He also wrote for Late Night with David Letterman during the 1980s, and occasionally appeared on the show as Flunky the late-night viewer mail clown, a depressed clown who smoked cigarettes and sometimes talked about his infected tattoos. Martin won four Emmys during his time at Late Night.He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, fellow television producer and writer Suzanne Martin and his youngest daughter. His eldest daughter graduated from NYU in 2010.

Joe Flaherty

Joe Flaherty (born June 21, 1941) is an American actor, comedian and voice artist. He is best known for his work on the Canadian sketch comedy SCTV from 1976 to 1984 (on which he also served as a writer), and as Harold Weir on Freaks and Geeks.

Kevin Curran (writer)

Kevin Patrick Curran (February 27, 1957 – October 25, 2016) was an American television comedy writer. He wrote for Late Night with David Letterman, Married... with Children, and The Simpsons. He was also the voice of Buck the Dog on Married... with Children (except for several episodes in which Buck was voiced by Cheech Marin).

In the sixth season episode "Psychic Avengers", Curran appeared briefly onscreen during the end sequence where, thanks to Madam Inga's curse, the Bundy family is turned into chimpanzees and Buck is turned into a human, in which Curran is credited as "Buck the Man" above the usual final credited character of "Buck the Dog". In addition to writing episodes and voicing Buck, Curran served as a story editor and supervising producer on Married... with Children.

Sanford Jay Frank

Sanford Jay "Sandy" Frank, also known as Sandy Frank (July 21, 1954 – April 18, 2014), was a television writer who was known as a writer for Late Night with David Letterman. He wrote for Letterman's NBC show for four years, during which the show won four Emmy Awards for comedy-variety writing. Frank had a bachelor's degree in mathematics and a law degree from Harvard and had written for The Harvard Lampoon.

He joined the writing staff for Late Night after running into his old college friend Jim Downey who served as head writer for the Letterman show and had been an original staff writer for Saturday Night Live. He also wrote for In Living Color and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.

The Banger Sisters

The Banger Sisters is a 2002 American comedy film written and directed by Bob Dolman, and produced by Fox Searchlight Pictures. The film stars Goldie Hawn and Susan Sarandon as two middle-aged women who used to be friends and groupies when they were young.

It was released on September 20, 2002. The film was Hawn's last acting role until the release of Snatched in 2017, fourteen and a half years after the release of The Banger Sisters.

Tom Schiller

Tom Schiller is an American writer best known for his eleven-year stint writing and directing short films for Saturday Night Live (following the show's original short film makers Albert Brooks and Gary Weis). His films, often featuring members of the original SNL cast, aired on the program in a segment titled, "Schiller's Reel."

He is the son of TV comedy writer/producer Bob Schiller.

Willow (film)

Willow is a 1988 American high fantasy film directed by Ron Howard, produced and with a story by George Lucas, and starring Warwick Davis, Val Kilmer, Joanne Whalley, Jean Marsh, and Billy Barty. Davis plays the eponymous lead character and hero: a reluctant farmer who plays a critical role in protecting a special baby from a tyrannical queen who vows to destroy her and take over the world in a high fantasy setting.

Lucas conceived the idea for the film in 1972, approaching Howard to direct during the post-production phase of Cocoon in 1985. Bob Dolman was brought in to write the screenplay, coming up with seven drafts before finishing in late 1986. It was then set up at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and principal photography began in April 1987, finishing the following October. The majority of filming took place at Elstree Studios in Hertfordshire, England, as well as Wales and New Zealand. Industrial Light & Magic created the visual effects sequences, which led to a revolutionary breakthrough with digital morphing technology. The film was released in 1988 to mixed reviews from critics, but was a modest financial success, received two Academy Award nominations, and has developed a cult following amongst fantasy fans.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.