Bob Dee

Robert Henry Dee (May 18, 1933 – April 18, 1979) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League and the American Football League. He was a three-sport letterman at the College of the Holy Cross who was one of the first players signed by the Boston Patriots of the American Football League in 1960.

After two years with the Washington Redskins in 1957–58, Dee returned to Holy Cross to tutor the team's linemen.

He became an ironman of the American Football League who never missed a game during his career, starting 112 consecutive games. Despite equipment improvements over the years, Dee was a superstitious player who chose to wear the same helmet throughout his career (105 of 112 games). Dee etched his name in the history books by scoring the first points in American Football League history, scoring a touchdown when he dove onto a fumble by Bills QB Tommy O'Connell (father of former Boston Bruins GM Mike O'Connell) the end zone in the second quarter of the league's first-ever exhibition game, a contest between the Patriots and the Bills on July 30, 1960.[1] He was voted to four American Football League All-Star teams (1961, 1963–65) and is a member of the Patriots All-1960s (AFL) Team.

Dee recorded 33 QB sacks (not including his strip sack of Tommy O'Connell in the AFL's first Exhibition Game).

Dee sacked Frank Tripucka, Al Dorow, Hunter Enis, Jacky Lee, MC Reynolds, Randy Duncan, Cotton Davidson, George Blanda, Jack Kemp, Johnny Green, John Hadl, Tobin Rote, Len Dawson, Eddie Wilson, Dick Wood, Joe Namath, Tom Flores, Rick Norton and Bob Griese and recovered fumbles by Al Carmichael, Art Baker, Wayne Crow, Jacky Lee, Paul Lowe, Bill Tobin, Wray Carlton & Max Chobian.

He had two interceptions in the Patriots 26-8 Eastern Divisional Playoff Game win over the Buffalo Bills. In that game, he wore one sneaker and one football shoe with spikes, which made him maneuver better in the snow in the game played at War Memorial Stadium on December 28, 1963.

On July 22, 1968, Dee announced his retirement from professional football, citing a business opportunity that was "too good to resist."

Dee died of a heart attack in 1979 while on a business trip.

He was awarded a game ball for his outstanding performance in the Patriots 34-17 win over the Houston Oilers on November 29, 1964.

He was inducted in the Patriots Hall of Fame on August 18, 1993.

In recognition of his accomplishments on the field, the Patriots retired his number (89).[2]

Bob Dee
Bob Dee (13561458823)
No. 89
Position:Defensive end
Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:May 18, 1933
Quincy, Massachusetts
Died:April 18, 1979 (age 45)
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Career information
College:Holy Cross
NFL Draft:1955 / Round: 19 / Pick: 220
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:134
Interceptions:2
Fumble recoveries:6
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 19, 2011. Retrieved August 4, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ http://www.boston.com/sports/football/patriots/reiss_pieces/2007/05/watson_on_84.html
1960 Boston Patriots season

The 1960 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 1st season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of five wins and nine losses, under their head coach Lou Saban, and thus were last place in the AFL's Eastern Division. The team played their home games at Boston University's Nickerson Field (formerly the site of the Boston Braves' home ballpark Braves Field).

1961 Boston Patriots season

The 1961 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 2nd season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of nine wins and four losses and one tie, and placed second in the AFL's Eastern Division.

1962 Boston Patriots season

The 1962 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 3rd season in the American Football League. The Patriots ended the season with a record of nine wins and four losses and one tie and placed second in the AFL's Eastern Division.

1963 Boston Patriots season

The 1963 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 4th season in the American Football League.

In their first season at Fenway Park, switching from Nickerson Field, the Patriots hovered around the .500 mark all season, and were in position to win the Eastern Division title outright with a victory on their final game. The 35–3 road loss to the defending champion Kansas City Chiefs allowed the Buffalo Bills catch up and both finished at 7–6–1, which required a divisional playoff game, the AFL's first. Both teams had a bye the following week, postponed from the Sunday after the assassination of President Kennedy; the tiebreaker playoff was scheduled for Saturday, December 28, at Buffalo's War Memorial Stadium. The teams split their two games during the regular season, with the home team winning, and the host Bills were slight favorites.The visiting Patriots won the playoff game 26–8 on a snowy field, with quarterback Babe Parilli throwing two touchdown passes to fullback Larry Garron, and three field goals were added by end Gino Cappelletti. With the win, Boston became Eastern Division champions, while the Western champion San Diego Chargers (11–3) were idle. The AFL championship game was played the next week in southern California on January 5, where San Diego routed the Patriots 51–10 at Balboa Stadium.

1964 Boston Patriots season

The 1964 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 5th season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of ten wins, three losses, and one tie, and finished second in the AFL's Eastern Division.

1965 Boston Patriots season

The 1965 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 6th season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of four wins and eight losses and two ties, and finished third in the AFL's Eastern Division.

1966 Boston Patriots season

The 1966 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 7th season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of eight wins and four losses and two ties, and finished second in the AFL's Eastern Division. This would be the last winning season the Patriots posted as an AFL team; they would not have another such season until 1976, by which time the team was in the NFL as the New England Patriots.

Bill Striegel

Bill Striegel (May 28, 1936 – July 23, 1992) was an American football guard, tackle and linebacker. He played for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1959 and for the Oakland Raiders and Boston Patriots in 1960.

Bob Soltis

Bob Soltis (April 1, 1936 – June 26, 2009) was an American football defensive back. He played for the Boston Patriots from 1960 to 1961.He died on June 26, 2009, in Chanhassen, Minnesota at age 73.

Gerhard Schwedes

Gerhard H. Schwedes (born April 23, 1938) is a former American football halfback who played two seasons in the American Football League with the Boston Patriots and New York Titans. He was drafted by the Baltimore Colts in the fourth round of the 1960 NFL Draft. He was also a territorial pick of the Boston Patriots in 1960 American Football League draft. He played college football at Syracuse University, which he led to a victory in the 1960 Cotton Bowl Classic, and attended Hunterdon Central Regional High School in Flemington, New Jersey. His son Scott Schwedes also played football at Syracuse and later the National Football League.

Hal Smith (American football)

Harold Wallace Smith Jr. (born October 3, 1935) is a former American football player who played with the Boston Patriots, Denver Broncos, and Oakland Raiders. He played college football at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Harry Jacobs (American football)

Harry Edwards Jacobs (born February 4, 1937) is a former American college and professional football player. A linebacker, he played college football for Bradley University and in the American Football League for the Boston Patriots from 1960 through 1962, and for the Buffalo Bills from 1963 through 1969.

Jack Atchason

John Dean "Jack" Atchason (born November 16, 1936) is a former American football end. He played college football at Western Illinois University, and played professionally in the American Football League in 1960, for the Boston Patriots and the Houston Oilers.

Jim Lee Hunt

Jim Lee "Earthquake" Hunt (October 5, 1938 – November 22, 1975) was an American college and professional football player from Prairie View A&M University who played defensive tackle for the American Football League's Boston Patriots from 1960 through 1969, and for the NFL' Boston Patriots in 1970. He was a four-time AFL All-Star, and was one of only twenty men to play the entire ten years of the AFL. He was used as a defensive end occasionally.

Mike Long (American football)

Michael Stanford Long (born October 29, 1938) is a former American football player who played with the Boston Patriots. He played college football at Brandeis University.

Mildred Wiley

Mildred Olive Wiley (December 3, 1901 – February 7, 2000) was an American high jumper who won a bronze medal at the 1928 Summer Olympics.

After marriage she changed her last name to Dee and gave birth to five children. One of them, Bob Dee, was a prominent professional footballer at the Boston Patriots in the 1960s.

Tony Discenzo

Anthony N. Discenzo (February 4, 1936 – February 11, 2007) was an American football tackle who played one season in the American Football League with the Boston Patriots and Buffalo Bills. He played college football at Michigan State University and attended Cathedral Latin High School in Cleveland, Ohio.

Twisted Wheel Club

The Twisted Wheel was a nightclub in Manchester, England, open from 1963 to 1971. It was one of the first clubs to play the music that became known as Northern Soul.The nightclub was founded by the brothers Jack, Phillip and Ivor Abadi as a blues and soul live music coffee bar/dance club. The original location of the club was on Brazennose Street, between Deansgate and Albert Square. This was the rhythm and blues mod venue, with Roger Eagle as DJ. The club's later location was at 6, Whitworth Street, M1 3QW. This venue was the mostly soul-oriented club with resident Saturday "All Niter" DJ Bob Dee compiling and supervising the playlist and utilising the newly developed slip-cueing technique to cue in vinyl records. The Whitworth Street venue was a converted warehouse, with a coffee snack bar on the ground floor and a series of rooms in the cellar. These lower rooms housed the stage, a caged disc jockey area, and the main dance room. Back-lit iron wheels decorated the simple painted brick walls. Ivor Abadi ran the club without an alcohol licence, serving only soft drinks and snacks. There was another Twisted Wheel in Blackpool under the same ownership.Prior to the opening of the Twisted Wheel, most UK nightclubs played modern popular music, Soul and R&B. The Twisted Wheel DJs and local entrepreneurs imported large quantities of records directly from the United States. Many of the records played at the Twisted Wheel were rare even in the United States; some may only have been released in one city or state. At the time, in addition to records released by larger record companies, there was a huge number of soul releases by a wide variety of artists on a multiplicity of obscure, independent labels.

All-night sessions were held each Saturday, from 11:00 pm through to Sunday 7:30 am. DJs played new records generally not played elsewhere. However, by 1969 more mainstream songs like Steam's "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" and Tony Joe White's "Polk Salad Annie" were added to the early session playlist. Allnight DJ, Brian "45" Philips introduced - Jerry Cook - "I Hurt on the Other Side"; Dobie Gray - "Out on the Floor"; The Artistics - "This Heart of Mine"; Leon Haywood - "Baby Reconsider", Earl Van Dyke - "6 by 6" and U.S releases on Ric-Tic, Brunswick, Okeh and other obscure labels.Each week at 2:00 am Soul artists performed live at the club. Junior Walker, Edwin Starr, Oscar Toney Jr., Marv Johnson, Mary Wells, Ike and Tina Turner, Johnny Johnson and the Bandwagon, and Inez and Charlie Foxx were among the many musicians to squeeze onto the tiny stage. Soul fans travelled from all over the UK for the wikt:all-nighters; some by car, most by train, coach or bus. Singer Chris Rea on his album Deltics commemorates the club in the song "Twisted Wheel". Rea is said to have written this song because of his chagrin at being too young to go on the organised trips to the club's weekend all-nighters from his hometown of Middlesbrough in the mid-1960s.The club gained the reputation of playing rare and uptempo soul. Following a visit to the Twisted Wheel in 1970, music journalist Dave Godin noted that the music played at the club, and in northern England in general, was quite different from the music played in London. His description "Northern Soul" became the accepted term for this genre and subculture.The club shut down in early 1971 because of a bylaw which prevented premises from staying open more than two hours into the following day. The closure of The Twisted Wheel gave the Golden Torch its opportunity to take the Northern Soul crown for the next few years until it too was shut down due to local council opposition. Today its legacy is eclipsed by that of the nearby Wigan Casino.

The Twisted Wheel was reopened in the 1970s as a fully licensed and expanded venue.In the few years before the demolition it was reopened as The Twisted Wheel by Pete Roberts, and enjoyed capacity attendance for its Sunday afternoon sessions, alongside of those sessions there were also all nighters and Friday evening sessions. From 2002, nostalgia soul nights were held in the original Whitworth Street location on the final Friday of every month. These nights featured the original DJ playlists and many original members attended. Two "Goldmine" recordings,Twisted Wheel and Twisted Wheel Again, feature songs from the original DJ playlists.

The physical structure of the Club was finally removed from the Manchester landscape in 2013 when it was demolished to make way for a hotel. This despite attempts to impress on the City Council the venue's cultural importance.

The Wheel has relocated to Night People, 105-107 Princess St, Manchester, M1 6DD. The club has 2 rooms with separate sound systems, one of which is solely dedicated to the legacy of the iconic Twisted Wheel, complete with original memorabilia and bare brick arches throughout, giving it the atmosphere that Whitworth St was famous for.

Having the same music policy of classic 60’s soul and R&B, they have ‘SUNDAY SOUL SESSIONS’ on the 2nd SUNDAY and LAST SUNDAY of every month, recreating those storming times at the Whitworth St club.

Walt Cudzik

Walter Jacob Cudzik (February 21, 1932 – December 11, 2005) was an American football center in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He also played in the American Football League for the Boston Patriots and the Buffalo Bills.

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Seasons (60)

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