Bob Carmichael

Bob "Nails" Carmichael (4 July 1940 – 18 November 2003) was an Australian tennis player and coach.

As a player, Carmichael won 1 singles title and 12 doubles titles, and achieved a Top 10 ranking in 1970.[1] Partnering Allan Stone, he reached the doubles final of the 1975 Australian Open. Following his retirement in 1979, Carmichael was a coach for Tennis Australia, and the Australian Institute of Sport. He coached top-ranking pros Patrick Rafter, Lleyton Hewitt, Darren Cahill and Leander Paes.

Bob Carmichael
Bob Carmichael
Carmichael Wimbledon Over 35's Doubles 1985
Full nameRobert Carmichael
Country (sports) Australia
Born4 July 1940
Melbourne, Australia
Died18 November 2003 (aged 63)
Melbourne, Australia
Height183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro1968 (amateur tour from 1963)
Retired1979
PlaysRight-handed (one-handed backhand)
Singles
Career record170–224 (Grand Slam, ATP Tour level, and Davis Cup in Open era)
Career titles1
Highest rankingNo. 10 (1970, World's Top 10)[1]
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenQF (1973)
French Open4R (1968)
WimbledonQF (1970)
US Open4R (1971)
Doubles
Career record312–215 (Grand Slam, ATP Tour level, and Davis Cup in Open era)
Career titles12
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenF (1975)
French OpenSF (1971, 1973)
WimbledonSF (1977)
US OpenSF (1977)
Mixed doubles
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
WimbledonQF (1970)

Doubles titles (12)

Outcome No. Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1. 1970 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) Australia Owen Davidson United States Arthur Ashe
United States Stan Smith
0–6, 7–5, 5–7
Winner 1. 1970 Buenos Aires, Argentina Clay Australia Ray Ruffels Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Željko Franulović
Czechoslovakia Jan Kodeš
7–5, 6–2, 5–7, 6–7, 6–3
Winner 2. 1971 Auckland, New Zealand Hard Australia Ray Ruffels New Zealand Brian Fairlie
South Africa Raymond Moore
6–3, 6–7, 6–4, 4–6, 6–3
Runner-up 2. 1971 Tehran WCT, Iran Clay Australia Ray Ruffels Australia John Newcombe
Australia Tony Roche
4–6, 7–6, 1–6
Runner-up 3. 1971 Washington WCT, U.S. Clay Australia Ray Ruffels Netherlands Tom Okker
United States Marty Riessen
6–7, 2–6
Winner 3. 1971 South Orange, U.S. Hard United States Tom Leonard United States Clark Graebner
United States Erik Van Dillen
6–4, 4–6, 6–4
Winner 4. 1972 Toronto WCT, Canada Carpet Australia Ray Ruffels Australia Roy Emerson
Australia Rod Laver
6–4, 4–6, 6–4
Winner 5. 1972 Quebec WCT, Canada Indoor Australia Ray Ruffels Australia John Alexander
Australia Terry Addison
4–6, 6–3, 7–5
Runner-up 4. 1972 Johannesburg-2, South Africa Hard Australia Terry Addison Australia John Newcombe
Australia Fred Stolle
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 5. 1973 Nottingham, U.S. Grass South Africa Frew McMillan United States Tom Gorman
United States Erik Van Dillen
4–6, 1–6
Runner-up 6. 1973 Båstad, Sweden Clay South Africa Frew McMillan Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Nikola Pilić
United States Stan Smith
6–2, 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 7. 1973 Bretton Woods, U.S. Clay South Africa Frew McMillan Australia Rod Laver
Australia Fred Stolle
6–7, 6–4, 5–7
Winner 6. 1973 Tanglewood, U.S. Other South Africa Frew McMillan Egypt Ismail El Shafei
New Zealand Brian Fairlie
6–3, 6–4
Winner 7. 1973 Indianapolis, U.S. Clay South Africa Frew McMillan Spain Manuel Orantes
Romania Ion Ţiriac
6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 8. 1973 Seattle, U.S. South Africa Frew McMillan United States Tom Gorman
Netherlands Tom Okker
6–2, 4–6, 6–7
Winner 8. 1973 Quebec City, Canada Other South Africa Frew McMillan United States Jimmy Connors
United States Marty Riessen
6–2, 7–6
Runner-up 9. 1973 Madrid, Spain Clay South Africa Frew McMillan Romania Ilie Năstase
Netherlands Tom Okker
3–6, 0–6
Runner-up 10. 1973 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) South Africa Frew McMillan United States Jimmy Connors
Romania Ilie Năstase
3–6, 7–6, 2–6
Runner-up 11. 1975 Australian Open, Melbourne Grass Australia Allan Stone Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
3–6, 6–7
Winner 9. 1975 Auckland, New Zealand Grass Australia Ray Ruffels New Zealand Brian Fairlie
New Zealand Onny Parun
7–6, RET.
Runner-up 12. 1975 Denver WCT, U.S. Carpet Australia Allan Stone Australia Roy Emerson
Australia Rod Laver
2–6, 6–3, 5–7
Runner-up 13. 1975 Las Vegas, U.S. Hard South Africa Cliff Drysdale Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
1–6, 4–6
Runner-up 14. 1975 Hong Kong Hard United States Gene Mayer Netherlands Tom Okker
Australia Ken Rosewall
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 15. 1976 Düsseldorf, Germany Clay South Africa Raymond Moore Poland Wojtek Fibak
West Germany Karl Meiler
4–6, 6–4, 4–6
Runner-up 16. 1976 Perth, Australia Hard Egypt Ismail El Shafei United States Dick Stockton
United States Roscoe Tanner
7–6, 1–6, 2–6
Winner 10. 1976 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Clay Australia Ken Rosewall Egypt Ismail El Shafei
New Zealand Brian Fairlie
6–4, 6–4
Winner 11. 1976 Bangalore, India Clay Australia Ray Ruffels India Chiraid Mukherjea
India Bhanu Nunna
6–2, 7–6
Runner-up 17. 1978 Miami, U.S. Carpet United States Brian Teacher United States Tom Gullikson
United States Gene Mayer
6–7, 3–6
Winner 12. 1978 Båstad, Sweden Clay Australia Mark Edmondson Hungary Péter Szőke
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 18. 1978 Hilversum, Netherlands Clay Australia Mark Edmondson Netherlands Tom Okker
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
6–7, 6–4, 5–7
Runner-up 19. 1978 Sydney Outdoor, Australia Grass Australia Syd Ball United States Hank Pfister
United States Sherwood Stewart
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 20. 1979 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet United States Brian Teacher United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
4–6, 5–7, 6–3, 6–7
Runner-up 21. 1979 Stuttgart Indoor, Germany Hard (i) United States Brian Teacher Poland Wojtek Fibak
Netherlands Tom Okker
3–6, 7–5, 6–7
Runner-up 22. 1979 Woodlands Doubles, U.S. Hard United States Tim Gullikson United States Marty Riessen
United States Sherwood Stewart
3–6, 2–2, RET.

References

  1. ^ a b "Bob Carmichael - player, coach and character - dies", The Age, November 19th 2003.

External links

1970 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1970 Pepsi-Cola ILTF Grand Prix was a tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. It was the inaugural edition of the Grand Prix circuit and consisted of men's tournaments recognised by the ILTF. The creation of the Grand Prix circuit, on an experimental basis during its first year, was announced in April 1970 by the president of the ILTF, Ben Barnett. It was the brainchild of Jack Kramer, former tennis promoter and winner of the Wimbledon and US championships, and was aimed at countering the influence of commercial promoters, particularly Lamar Hunt and his World Championship Tennis circuit and George MacCall's National Tennis League.The tournaments were graded in one of three categories which determined the number of ranking points available: Class A, comprising the three Grand Slam tournaments, Class 1 and Class 2. The Pepsi-Cola Masters and Davis Cup Final are included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix. In addition to the tournament prize money a bonus pool of $150,000 was available for the top 20 ranked players. The bonus pool was jointly funded by Pepsi-Cola as title sponsor and the participating tournaments which reserved 10% of their prize money. Cliff Richey earned $25,000 bonus as the winner of the first Grand Prix circuit. At the end of the season the top six ranked players qualified for a Masters round-robin tournament held in Tokyo which was won by Stan Smith.

All open tennis tournaments were eligible to be included in the Grand Prix circuit provided they committed to not paying any management fees to commercial organizations with players under contract. Originally the Italian Championships, played in April in Rome, was part of the Grand Prix calendar but it was withdrawn during the tournament when it became known that they had paid management fees to the competing World Championship Tennis organization.

1970 South American Championships (tennis)

The 1970 South American Open Championships was a men's tennis tournament that was part of the 1970 Pepsi-Cola Grand Prix and held in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was the third edition of the tournament and ran from 31 October through 8 November 1970. It was played on outdoor clay courts. Željko Franulović won the singles title.

1970 Stockholm Open – Doubles

The 1970 Stockholm Open was a tennis tournament played on hard courts and part of the 1970 Pepsi-Cola Grand Prix and took place in Stockholm, Sweden. The tournament was held from November 1 through November 7, 1970. Arthur Ashe and Stan Smith won in the final by defeating Bob Carmichael and Owen Davidson, 6–0, 5–7, 7–5.

1971 French Open – Mixed Doubles

Bob Hewitt and Billie Jean King were the defending champions but both players chose not to participate.

Jean-Claude Barclay and Françoise Dürr won in the final 6–2, 6–4 against Tomas Lejus and Winnie Shaw.

1971 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1971 Pepsi Cola Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit held that year. It incorporated three of the four grand slam tournaments, the Grand Prix tournaments. It was the second edition of the Grand Prix circuit and was run by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ITLF). In addition to regular tournament prize money a bonus prize money pool of £60,000 ($150,000) was available to be divided among the 20 highest ranking players after the last tournament. To be eligible for a share of the bonus pool a player had to compete in a minimum of nine tournaments. The circuit culminated in a Masters event in Paris, France for the seven highest point scoring players. Stan Smith was the winner of the circuit with 187 ranking points and four tournament victories.

1971 New Zealand Open

The 1971 ATP Auckland Open was a men's Grand Prix tennis tournament played on outdoor hard courts. It was in Auckland, New Zealand from 7 March to 13 March 1971. Bob Carmichael won the singles title.

1972 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1972 World Championship Tennis circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1972. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT). The circuit included twenty-three regular events, and two circuit finals, one taking place in May, counting for the second half of the 1971 season, and the first part of the 1972 season, and a smaller one taking place in November, counting for the second half of the 1972 season.

1973 French Open – Men's Doubles

Bob Hewitt and Frew McMillan were the defending champions but only Frew McMillan competed that year with Bob Carmichael. Bob Carmichael and Frew McMillan lost in the semifinals to John Newcombe and Tom Okker.

John Newcombe and Tom Okker won in the final 6–1, 3–6, 6–3, 5–7, 6–4 against Jimmy Connors and Ilie Năstase.

1973 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1973 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix was a tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. This article covers all tournaments that were part of that year's Men's Grand Prix. The Commercial Union Assurance Masters and Davis Cup Final are included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix.

1973 Stockholm Open – Doubles

Tom Okker and Marty Riessen were the defending champions, but lost in the semifinals this year.

Jimmy Connors and Ilie Năstase won the title, defeating Bob Carmichael and Frew McMillan 6–3, 6–7, 6–2 in the final.

1975 Australian Open – Men's Doubles

Ross Case and Geoff Masters were the defending champions and second seeds, but they lost to unseeded West Germans Harald Elschenbroich and Rolf Gehring in the first round.

In an all-Australian final on home soil (for the fourth year in a row), the third seeds John Alexander and Phil Dent defeated the fifth seeds Bob Carmichael and Allan Stone to win the title, 6–3, 7–6. This was Alexander's first Grand Slam title (he would later win the 1982 Australian Open with John Fitzgerald) and Dent's first and only Grand Slam title.

1976 Japan Open Tennis Championships

The 1976 Japan Open Tennis Championships was a tennis tournament played on hard courts and part of the 1976 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix circuit. It was the fourth edition of the event and took place in Tokyo, Japan. The tournament was held from November 1 through November 7, 1976. First-seeded Roscoe Tanner won the singles title.

1978 Swedish Open

The 1978 Swedish Open was a men's tennis tournament played on outdoor clay courts held in Båstad, Sweden. It was part of the 1978 Grand Prix circuit. It was the 31st edition of the tournament and was held from July 17 through July 23, 1978. Björn Borg won the singles title.

Allan Stone

Allan Stone (born 14 October 1945) played amateur and professional tennis in the 1960s and 1970s. He was ranked as high as World No. 38 in singles on the ATP Rankings in April 1975.Stone found the majority of his success on the doubles court. He won 11 doubles titles during his career, including the Australian Open in 1977 and the Australian Championships (the predecessor to the Australian Open) in 1968. In singles, he reached four finals, including Cincinnati.Stone moved to Victoria and played amateur tennis for the Warburton Tennis Club where he was coached by Mary Morton.

He attended Caulfield Grammar School and completed a Commerce Degree at the University of Melbourne.

Bob Carmichael (footballer)

Bob Carmichael (11 February 1882 – 23 February 1954) was a former Australian rules footballer who played with Collingwood in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Jesse Carmichael

Jesse Royal Carmichael (born April 2, 1979) is an American musician and songwriter. He plays the keyboards and rhythm guitar for the pop rock band Maroon 5. Carmichael also has a solo project called 1863.

Ray Ruffels

Raymond Owen "Ray" Ruffels (born 23 March 1946) is an Australian former professional tennis player and coach.

Raymond Moore (tennis)

Raymond J. "Ray" Moore (born 24 August 1946) is a former professional tennis player from South Africa. During his career he won eight doubles titles, finishing runner-up an additional 12 times in doubles. Moore participated in 12 Davis Cup ties for South Africa from 1967 to 1977, including the 1974 South African victory, posting a 12–10 record in singles and posting an 0–1 mark in doubles.

In 1981, Ray teamed with Charlie Pasarell to begin the tournament that eventually became the Indian Wells Masters at the Indian Wells Gardens. They started at La Quinta Resort and Club, moved to Grand Champions Hotel, and then in 2000 opened the new Indian Wells Gardens, which holds the ATP Masters BNP Paribus Open. Moore and Pasarell sold the tournament to Larry Ellison in 2009 and Moore became the Tournament Director/CEO for the new owner.

Tom Gorman (tennis)

Tom Gorman (born January 19, 1946) is an American tennis player.

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