Blue Jasmine

Blue Jasmine is a 2013 American black comedy-drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. The film tells the story of a formerly rich Manhattan socialite (Cate Blanchett) who falls on hard times and has to move into her working class sister (Sally Hawkins)'s apartment in San Francisco.

The film had a limited release on July 26, 2013, in New York and Los Angeles, before expanding wide on August 23, 2013.

Blue Jasmine received praise from critics, particularly for Blanchett's performance.[4][5] Blanchett won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and Hawkins and Allen were nominated for Best Supporting Actress and Original Screenplay, respectively. Blanchett also won the Golden Globe Award, the SAG Award, and the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. The film was a box office success, earning $97.5 million worldwide against a budget of $18 million.[2][3]

Blue Jasmine
An elegant blonde blue eyed woman, sunglasses on her head, looking to the left.
Theatrical release poster
Directed byWoody Allen
Produced by
Written byWoody Allen
Starring
CinematographyJavier Aguirresarobe
Edited byAlisa Lepselter
Production
companies
  • Gravier Productions
  • Perdido Productions
Distributed bySony Pictures Classics
Release date
  • July 26, 2013 (New York City premiere)
  • August 23, 2013 (United States)
Running time
98 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$18 million[2]
Box office$97.5 million[3]

Plot

Jasmine Francis (Cate Blanchett) disembarks in San Francisco after a flight from New York City. She takes a taxi to her sister Ginger's (Sally Hawkins) apartment, where Ginger is dismayed to learn that Jasmine traveled first class despite claiming to be broke. Jasmine has recently suffered a nervous breakdown and, having incurred heavy debts, has been forced to seek refuge with her sister.

A series of flashbacks reveal that Jasmine's husband, money manager Hal Francis (Alec Baldwin), was arrested for defrauding his clients. Ginger and her husband, Augie (Andrew Dice Clay), were among Hal's victims; he swindled them out of $200,000 of lottery winnings that Augie had wanted to start a business with, and their marriage fell apart. Hal committed suicide in prison after being publicly disgraced. Jasmine's step-son Danny (Alden Ehrenreich) dropped out of Harvard and cut himself off completely from Jasmine, believing her to be complicit in Hal's crimes. After Hal's death, Jasmine began drinking heavily and abusing anti-anxiety medication. She also developed a habit of talking to herself about her past.

Ginger is now dating a mechanic called Chili (Bobby Cannavale), whom Jasmine detests for his low breeding and coarse manners. She considers becoming an interior designer because of her "great taste" and past experience in decorating her homes. She wants to take online courses, but having no computer skills, she decides to take a class in computers to gain basic proficiency. With no income, she grudgingly takes a job as a receptionist with a dentist (Michael Stuhlbarg), who pesters her with unwanted sexual advances. When he tries to assault her, she fights him off and quits.

Jasmine's situation improves when she meets a wealthy widower, Dwight (Peter Sarsgaard), at a party. Dwight is a diplomat aspiring to become a Congressman. She poses as an interior designer, telling him that her husband was a surgeon who died of a heart attack. Dwight is impressed by her stylishness and invites her to decorate his new home. Ginger begins a romance with Al (Louis C.K.), whom she met at the same party. She breaks up with Chili, who begs her not to leave him. Eventually, she finds out that Al is married and gets back with Chili, realizing she has been influenced by Jasmine.

Jasmine develops a romance with Dwight, and he is about to buy her an engagement ring when they bump into Augie outside the jewelry store. Augie rails at Jasmine about what Hal did to Ginger and him. Augie also reveals that Danny is living nearby in Oakland and is now married. Dwight is outraged that Jasmine lied to him and calls off the engagement. Jasmine goes to Oakland and finds Danny, who tells Jasmine he never wants to see her again because of what she did to his father.

It is revealed that Jasmine finally learned of Hal's many affairs and confronted him. When he told her he wanted to divorce her to be with a 19-year-old au pair, Jasmine, in a moment of blind rage, called the FBI to inform the authorities of Hal's fraudulent business dealings, which led to his arrest.

Jasmine returns to her sister's apartment and finds Ginger back with Chili, who is moving in now. Jasmine and Chili needle each other, and Jasmine is furious when Ginger takes his side. Jasmine lies to Ginger, claiming that she is going to marry Dwight, and tells her she is moving out that day. Leaving the door open as she exits the apartment, she walks to a park bench and mutters to herself.

Cast

Production

In late March 2012, it was announced that Cate Blanchett was being considered for the lead role.[6] This was later confirmed along with the rest of the principal cast in June 2012.[7] In preparation for her role, Blanchett explained, "I did a lot of people watching. I drank my fair share of rosé. In the end I had to play the anti-heroine that Woody's written, but of course I thought about the Madoff scandal, because that's the holocaust of the financial crisis. And there are many, many women like that. I followed them like everybody else did, but as an actress you go back and you're slightly more forensic about those relationships."[8]

Filming of Blue Jasmine in San Francisco, August 22, 2012

The film was shot in 2012 in New York City and San Francisco.[9] Letty Aronson, Stephen Tenenbaum, and Edward Walson served as the film's producers.[10] Sony Pictures Classics distributed the film, marking the sixth collaboration between the label and Allen.[11]

The outfits for Blanchett's Jasmine were an important part of her character and narrative, but they were difficult to assemble because of a very limited total costume budget of $35,000.[12] To supplement this, costume designer Suzy Benzinger used her and Woody Allen's connections with various fashion houses to borrow some of the more expensive items for the production. These included Fendi, Chanel, Hermès, Oscar de la Renta and Carolina Herrera.[13] Blanchett also helped, by using her relationship with Louis Vuitton to secure monogrammed luggage for the production, after Vuitton refused Benzinger's request. Karl Lagerfeld supplied two copies of the white Chanel bouclé jacket which Jasmine wears throughout the film, one brand new for the flashback scenes of Jasmine's affluent life in New York, and one for the San Francisco scenes which Benzinger distressed by soaking in fabric softener to give it the appearance of overuse.[13]

Release

Blue Jasmine had a limited release at six theaters in Los Angeles and New York City on July 26, 2013, and expanded nationwide on August 23, 2013.[14]

Woody Allen refused to release Blue Jasmine in India because the country requires a blurb to be inserted at the bottom of any scenes during which a character is smoking. This is in addition to health warnings that are required to be shown at the beginning and end of the film.[15]

Reception

Box office

The film received a slow rollout, modeled after the release of Midnight in Paris; it was estimated to have grossed over US$600,000 in its first three days, which took place at six theaters in Los Angeles and New York City.[14] It was Allen's "best-ever opening per-screen average" and the year's highest per-screen average, beating Spring Breakers' "impressive debut on three screens".[14] The film grossed US$33.4 million in the United States and US$64.1 million in the rest of the world.[3]

Critical response

Rotten Tomatoes gives the film an approval rating of 91%, with an average rating of 8.1/10, based on 210 reviews. The website's critical consensus states, "Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine finds the director in peak late-period form—and benefiting from a superb cast led by Cate Blanchett."[16] On Metacritic, the film received a score of 78/100 based on 47 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[17]

Early reviews suggested the film would be rated very highly among Allen's recent offerings, and praised Blanchett's performance as one of her strongest, if not the best of her career: David Denby of The New Yorker stated that "in all, this is the strongest, most resonant movie Woody Allen has made in years".[18] Mick LaSalle, writing for the San Francisco Chronicle, wrote that "Blanchett in Blue Jasmine is beyond brilliant, beyond analysis. This is jaw-dropping work, what we go to the movies hoping to see, and we do. Every few years."[19] Andrew Dice Clay's performance was also critically praised in the film.[20]

Some critics have argued the film is Allen's response or tribute to the Tennessee Williams play A Streetcar Named Desire, as it shares a very similar plot and characters.[4][5] It also features cast members who have previously been associated with the play: Baldwin played the role of Stanley Kowalski on stage in 1992 and in the 1995 adaptation of the play, while Blanchett played the leading role of Blanche DuBois in the Australian production of the play staged by the Sydney Theatre Company in 2008.[21] Other critics and cultural commentators theorized that the story of Jasmine as a "shrill narcissist falling apart" and "in a crisis of self-flagellation after living in denial for years" was modeled on Allen's former companion, Mia Farrow, and that the film is a response to their high-profile and acrimonious break-up.[22][23]

Accolades

At the 2014 Academy Awards ceremony, Blue Jasmine had three nominations: Best Actress for Blanchett, Best Supporting Actress for Hawkins and Best Original Screenplay for Allen.[24] Blanchett was the sole winner.[25] At the 2014 Golden Globe Awards ceremony, the film had two nominations: Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama for Blanchett and Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture for Hawkins, with Blanchett going on to win. Blanchett also won Best Actress at the BAFTAs, Screen Actors Guild Awards, Independent Spirit Awards and Satellite Awards.[26][27][28][29] Allen's screenplay was also nominated at the Writers Guild of America Awards[30] and the film was nominated for or won dozens of other awards worldwide.

Home media

Blue Jasmine was released on Blu-ray and DVD on January 21, 2014.

References

  1. ^ "BLUE JASMINE (12A)". British Board of Film Classification. August 23, 2013. Retrieved August 23, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Block, Alex (November 18, 2013). "Woody Allen in San Francisco: The Making of 'Blue Jasmine'". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 18, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c "Blue Jasmine". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved May 12, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Handy, Bruce (July 26, 2013). "Movie Review: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine Is Perhaps His Cruelest-Ever Film". Vanity Fair. Condé Nast. Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  5. ^ a b Wolcott, Gary (August 22, 2013). "Blue Jasmine: Woody Allen's excellent homage to A Streetcar Named Desire". Tri-city Herald. Retrieved September 12, 2013.
  6. ^ Fleming Jr., Mike (March 29, 2012). "Woody Allen Eyes Cate Blanchett, Bradley Cooper For New Film". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Business Media. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  7. ^ McNary, Dave (June 4, 2012). "Louis C.K., Dice Clay in Woody Allen pic". Variety. Penske Business Media. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  8. ^ Pond, Steve (July 26, 2013). "How Cate Blanchett prepared to play a boozer in Woody Allen's 'Blue Jasmine'". TheWrap. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  9. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (January 8, 2013). "Woody Allen Names His New Movie 'Blue Jasmine'". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  10. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (January 8, 2013). "Sony Pictures Classics Nabs Woody Allen's 'Blue Jasmine'". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  11. ^ "Sony Pictures Classics Acquires Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine". Sony Pictures. January 8, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  12. ^ Trebay, Guy (August 13, 2013). "In 'Blue Jasmine,' Suzy Benzinger Turns Clothes Into Characters". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  13. ^ a b C, Marie (February 14, 2014). "Hermes, Vuitton, Fendi: Cate Blanchett's amazing wardrobe in BLUE JASMINE". Cinemazzi. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  14. ^ a b c Stewart, Andrew (July 28, 2013). "Cate Blanchett dramedy expands wide Aug. 23". Variety. Penske Business Media. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  15. ^ Jamkhandikar, Shilpa (October 3, 2013). "Woody Allen stops "Blue Jasmine" India release because of anti-tobacco ads–India Insight". Reuters. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  16. ^ "Blue Jasmine (2013)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  17. ^ "Blue Jasmine Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  18. ^ Denby, David (July 29, 2013). "Timely Projects". The New Yorker. Condé Nast. Retrieved September 7, 2013.
  19. ^ LaSalle, Mick (August 2, 2013). "'Blue Jasmine' review: Allen, Blanchett dazzle". San Francisco Chronicle. Hearst Communications. Retrieved September 28, 2013.
  20. ^ Huver, Scott (July 30, 2013). "Andrew Dice Clay: A Reinvention in 'Blue'". NBC Bay Area. NBCUniversal. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  21. ^ Jinman, Richard (September 3, 2009). "Blanchett injured in stage fight". Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved December 16, 2015.
  22. ^ Bale, Miriam (July 24, 2013). "Blue Jasmine: It's about Mia Farrow!". The L Magazine. Retrieved August 23, 2016.
  23. ^ Smith, Liz (October 16, 2013). "Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine—Blanche DuBois or... Mia Farrow?". HuffPost. Oath. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  24. ^ "2014 Oscar Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. January 16, 2014. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2014.
  25. ^ "Oscars 2014 Winners: The Complete List". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. March 2, 2014. Archived from the original on July 23, 2014. Retrieved March 9, 2014.
  26. ^ "Bafta Film Awards 2014: Full list of winners". BBC News. February 17, 2014. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved February 17, 2014.
  27. ^ "SAG Awards 2014: Winners in Full". BBC News. January 19, 2014. Archived from the original on February 7, 2014. Retrieved March 21, 2014.
  28. ^ "'12 Years a Slave' Wins Best Feature at Spirit Awards". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. March 1, 2014. Archived from the original on March 8, 2014. Retrieved March 9, 2014.
  29. ^ "Satellite Awards: '12 Years a Slave' Wins Best Motion Picture". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. February 23, 2014. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 21, 2014.
  30. ^ "WGA Awards 2014: Complete list of winners and nominees". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. January 30, 2014. Archived from the original on April 29, 2014. Retrieved February 3, 2014.

External links

18th Satellite Awards

The 18th Satellite Awards is an award ceremony honoring the year's outstanding performers, films, television shows, home videos and interactive media, presented by the International Press Academy at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Century City, Los Angeles as part of the 2013–14 film awards season.

The nominations were announced on December 2, 2013. The winners were announced on February 23, 2014.

19th Empire Awards

The 19th Empire Awards ceremony (officially known as the Jameson Empire Awards), presented by the British film magazine Empire, honored the best films of 2013 and took place on 30 March 2014 at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London, England. During the ceremony, Empire presented Empire Awards in 14 categories as well as five honorary awards. The awards for Best Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress were first introduced this year. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Empire magazine two special honorary awards were presented, the Action Hero of our Lifetime and the Legend of our Lifetime awards. Irish actor James Nesbitt hosted the show for the first time. The awards were sponsored by Jameson Irish Whiskey for the sixth consecutive year.In related events, Empire and Jameson Irish Whiskey held the 5th Done In 60 Seconds Competition Global Final on March 29, 2014 at The Brewery, London, England. The team of judges consisted of Empire editor-in-chief Mark Dinning, Sky Movies Premiere English presenter Alex Zane, Scottish radio DJ Edith Bowman, Scottish director Jon S. Baird and English director Ben Wheatley, which selected from a shortlist of 24 nominees the five Done In 60 Seconds Award finalists that were invited to the Empire Awards where the winner was announced.Gravity won two awards including Best Film and Best Director for Alfonso Cuarón. Other winners included The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug also with two awards and 12 Years a Slave, Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa, Blue Jasmine, Filth, Saving Mr. Banks, The Conjuring, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, The Wolf of Wall Street and The World's End with one. Simon Pegg received the Empire Hero Award, Hugh Jackman received the Empire Icon Award, Paul Greengrass received the Empire Inspiration Award, Arnold Schwarzenegger received the special honorary 25th anniversary Action Hero of our Lifetime award and Tom Cruise received the special honorary 25th anniversary Legend of our Lifetime award. David Smith from the United Kingdom won the Done In 60 Seconds Award for There Will Be Blood (Milk), his 60-second film version of There Will Be Blood.

29th Independent Spirit Awards

The 29th Independent Spirit Awards announced its nominees on November 27, 2013. The winners were announced on March 1, 2014. It was hosted by Patton Oswalt.

3rd AACTA International Awards

The 3rd Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts International Awards (commonly known as the AACTA International Awards), were presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television. Awards were handed out for the best films of 2013 regardless of geography, and are the international counterpart to the awards for Australian films (held on 28 and 30 January). The ceremony took place at Sunset Marquis in Los Angeles, California on 10 January 2014 and will be televised in Australia on 12 January on the Arena network.The nominees were announced on 14 December 2013. 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle and Gravity won two awards each, with the latter film winning Best Film. Blue Jasmine was the only other winning film, with one for Best Actress.

67th British Academy Film Awards

The 67th British Academy Film Awards, more commonly known as the BAFTAs, were held on 16 February 2014 at the Royal Opera House in London, honouring the best national and foreign films of 2013. The nominations were announced on 8 January 2014 by actor Luke Evans and actress Helen McCrory. Presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, accolades were handed out for the best feature-length film and documentaries of any nationality that were screened at British cinemas in 2013.Gravity won six of its eleven nominations, including Best Director for Alfonso Cuarón, Outstanding British Film, Best Cinematography, Best Original Music, Best Sound, and Best Special Visual Effects. 12 Years a Slave won Best Film and Best Actor in a Leading Role for Chiwetel Ejiofor. Cate Blanchett won Best Actress in a Leading Role for Blue Jasmine, Barkhad Abdi won Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Captain Phillips, and Jennifer Lawrence won Best Actress in a Supporting Role for American Hustle.The ceremony was broadcast on BBC One and BBC Three. It was hosted by Stephen Fry, the ninth time he's hosted the ceremony. The ceremony opened with a duet call "Heroes" from Tinie Tempah and singer Laura Mvula. Viewing figures were the lowest since 2010, with 4.73 million watching the ceremony.

86th Academy Awards

The 86th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2013 and took place on March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. The ceremony was scheduled well after its usual late-February date to avoid conflicting with the 2014 Winter Olympics. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards (commonly referred to as Oscars) in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Neil Meron and Craig Zadan and directed by Hamish Hamilton. Actress Ellen DeGeneres hosted the show for the second time, having previously hosted the 79th ceremony held in 2007.In related events, the Academy held its 5th annual Governors Awards ceremony at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center on November 16, 2013. On February 15, 2014, in a ceremony at The Beverly Hills Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by hosts Kristen Bell and Michael B. Jordan.12 Years a Slave won three awards including Best Picture. Gravity won the most awards with seven including Best Director for Alfonso Cuarón. Other winners included Dallas Buyers Club also with three awards, Frozen, and The Great Gatsby with two, and Blue Jasmine, The Great Beauty, Helium, Her, The Lady in Number 6, Mr Hublot, and 20 Feet from Stardom with one. The telecast garnered nearly 44 million viewers in the United States, making it the most watched Oscar ceremony since the 72nd Academy Awards in 2000.

Alden Ehrenreich

Alden Caleb Ehrenreich (; born November 22, 1989) is an American actor. He made his feature-film debut in Francis Ford Coppola's Tetro in 2009, and also appeared in Coppola's subsequent film, Twixt (2011). In 2013, he appeared in Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and Park Chan-wook's Stoker. In 2016, Ehrenreich gained significant critical praise for his scene-stealing role as Hobie Doyle in the Coen brothers comedy Hail, Caesar! and for his leading role in Warren Beatty's romantic comedy-drama Rules Don't Apply. He played the Young Han Solo in Solo: A Star Wars Story, which focuses on the early years of the character, before the events of A New Hope.

Bobby Cannavale

Robert Michael Cannavale (; born May 3, 1970) is an American actor known for various film, television, and stage roles, including starring roles in Third Watch, Boardwalk Empire, Vinyl, Will & Grace, and Mr. Robot.

Cannavale had a recurring role on the NBC comedy series Will & Grace as Will Truman's long-term boyfriend Officer Vincent "Vince" D'Angelo, for which he won the 2005 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series; and portrayed Gyp Rosetti during the third season of the HBO drama series Boardwalk Empire, for which he won the 2013 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series. In 2016, he starred in the HBO drama series Vinyl, produced by Martin Scorsese and Mick Jagger. In 2017, he joined the cast of the USA Network drama series Mr. Robot during its third season.

For his roles in Mauritius and The Motherfucker with the Hat, Cannavale was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play and the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play, respectively. He has appeared in The Station Agent (2003), Shall We Dance? (2004), Snakes on a Plane (2006), The Other Guys (2010), Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine (2013), Chef (2014), the remake of Annie (2014), Paul Feig's Spy (2015), Ant-Man (2015), Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017), and I, Tonya (2017).

Chicago Film Critics Association Awards 2013

The 26th Chicago Film Critics Association Awards were announced on December 16, 2013. The awards honor the best in film for 2013. The nominations were announced on December 13, 2013.

Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Awards 2013

The 19th Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Awards honoring the best in film for 2013 were announced on December 16, 2013. These awards "recognizing extraordinary accomplishment in film" are presented annually by the Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association (DFWFCA), based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex region of Texas. The organization, founded in 1990, includes 29 film critics for print, radio, television, and internet publications based in north Texas. The Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association began presenting its annual awards list in 1993.12 Years a Slave and Gravity were the DFWFCA's most awarded films of 2013, each taking three top honors. The former won Best Picture, Best Screenplay (John Ridley), and Best Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o), while the latter won Best Director (Alfonso Cuarón), Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki), and Best Musical Score (Steven Price). The Best Picture win for 12 Years a Slave continued a trend of critics groups across the United States giving their top prizes to the film adaptation of the autobiography by Solomon Northup, a free negro who was kidnapped and sold into slavery.Only one other film, Dallas Buyers Club, earned multiple 2013 honors from the DFWFCA. Set in mid-1980s Dallas, the drama received top honors for Best Actor (Matthew McConaughey) and Best Supporting Actor (Jared Leto). Cate Blanchett was named Best Actress for her title role in Blue Jasmine. The other films earning honors were France's Blue Is the Warmest Colour for Best Foreign Language Film, 20 Feet from Stardom as Best Documentary Film, and Frozen for Best Animated Film.Along with the 12 "best of" category awards, the group also presented the Russell Smith Award to Fruitvale Station as the "best low-budget or cutting-edge independent film" of the year. The award is named in honor of late Dallas Morning News film critic Russell Smith.

Empire Award for Best Supporting Actress

The Empire Award for Best Supporting Actress is an Empire Award presented annually by the British film magazine Empire to honor an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a supporting role while working within the film industry. The Empire Award for Best Supporting Actress is one of two ongoing awards which were first introduced at the 19th Empire Awards ceremony in 2014 (along with Best Supporting Actor) with Sally Hawkins receiving the award for her role in Blue Jasmine. Winners are voted by the readers of Empire magazine.

List of accolades received by Blue Jasmine

Blue Jasmine is a 2013 American black comedy-drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. It stars Cate Blanchett as a New York socialite, Jeanette "Jasmine" French, who falls into poverty and homelessness. Alec Baldwin, Louis C.K., Bobby Canavale, Andrew Dice Clay and Sally Hawkins feature in supporting roles. The film premiered in six theaters in New York and Los Angeles on July 26, 2013. Sony Picture Classics later gave it a wide release on August 23, in more than 1,200 theaters in the United States and Canada. The film has grossed a worldwide total of more than $97 million on a production budget of $18 million.Rotten Tomatoes, a review aggregator, surveyed 205 reviews and judged 91 percent to be positive.Blue Jasmine has garnered awards and nominations in a variety of categories with particular praise for Blanchett's portrayal of the titular protagonist. At the 2014 Academy Awards ceremony, Blue Jasmine had three nominations: Best Actress for Blanchett, Best Supporting Actress for Hawkins and Best Original Screenplay for Allen. Blanchett was the sole winner. At the 2014 Golden Globe Awards ceremony, the film had two nominations: Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama for Blanchett and Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture for Hawkins, with Blanchett going on to win. Blanchett also won Best Actress at the BAFTAs, Screen Actors Guild Awards, Independent Spirit Awards and Satellite Awards. Allen's screenplay was also nominated at the Writers Guild of America Awards.

List of awards and nominations received by Cate Blanchett

The following is a list of awards and nominations received by Australian actress Cate Blanchett. Among her numerous accolades for her performances, she has received two Academy Awards, six AACTA Awards, three British Academy Film Awards, three Critics' Choice Movie Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, four Helpmann Awards, three Independent Spirit Awards, three Screen Actors Guild Awards, and awards from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics, New York Film Critics Circle, and Venice Film Festival. Her performance as Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator, made her the only actor to win an Oscar for portraying another Oscar-winning actor. Blanchett is only the third actress, after Jessica Lange and Meryl Streep, to win Best Actress after winning Best Supporting Actress. She is one of only six actors (and the only actress) in the history of the Oscars to be nominated twice for portraying the same role in two films (Elizabeth I in the films Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age), and the eleventh actor to receive two acting nominations in the same year. She is also the only Australian to win two acting Oscars.Blanchett received Premiere magazine's Icon Award in 2006. In 2008, she received the Santa Barbara International Film Festival Modern Master Award in recognition of her accomplishments in the film industry. Also in 2008, she was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame with a motion pictures star at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard. She received Women in Film and Television International's Crystal Award for excellence in the entertainment industry in 2014. In 2015, Blanchett was honoured at the Museum of Modern Art's Film Benefit for her outstanding contributions to the industry. She received the British Film Institute Fellowship in recognition of her outstanding contribution to film, presented to her by fellow actor Ian McKellen. Blanchett was the recipient of the AACTA Longford Lyell Award for her "outstanding contribution to the enrichment of Australia's screen environment and culture". In 2016, she received the Costume Designers Guild Lacoste Spotlight Award, in honour of an "enduring commitment to excellence" and her "appreciation for the artistry of costume design and collaboration with the Costume Designers".In June 2017, Blanchett was named a Companion of the Order of Australia in the Queen's Birthday Honours, for services to the performing arts and as a supporter of humanitarian and environmental causes, which entitles her to use the post-nominal letters "AC" after her name. Blanchett was appointed Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French Minister of Culture in 2012, in recognition of her significant contributions to the arts. Blanchett was awarded the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society by the Australian government. She has been presented with a Doctor of Letters from University of Sydney, University of New South Wales, and Macquarie University, in recognition of her extraordinary contribution to the arts, philanthropy, and the community.

London Film Critics Circle Awards 2013

The 34th London Film Critics' Circle Awards, honouring the best in film for 2013, were announced by the London Film Critics' Circle on 2 February 2014.

Michael Stuhlbarg

Michael Stuhlbarg (; born July 5, 1968) is an American actor. He rose to prominence as troubled university professor Larry Gopnik in the 2009 dark comedy film A Serious Man, directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Stuhlbarg has appeared in numerous films and television series portraying real life figures, such as George Yeaman in Lincoln (2012), Lew Wasserman in Hitchcock (2012), Andy Hertzfeld in Steve Jobs (2015), Edward G. Robinson in Trumbo (2015), Abe Rosenthal in The Post (2017), and Arnold Rothstein in HBO's Boardwalk Empire (2010–2013). Other notable supporting roles include Men in Black 3 (2012), Blue Jasmine (2013), Arrival (2016), and Doctor Strange (2016), as well as the third season of the anthology television series Fargo (2017). In 2017, Stuhlbarg appeared in the critically acclaimed productions Call Me by Your Name, The Shape of Water and The Post, all three of which were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, as well as receiving several wins and nominations from critics and other award groups.

Online Film Critics Society Awards 2013

The 17th Online Film Critics Society Awards, honoring the best in film for 2013, were announced on 16 December 2013.

Sally Hawkins

Sally Cecilia Hawkins (born 27 April 1976) is an English actress. Her first major role was in Mike Leigh's All or Nothing in 2002. She continued working with Leigh, appearing in a supporting role in Vera Drake (2004) and taking the lead in Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), for which she won several awards, including the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy and the Silver Bear for Best Actress.

Hawkins appeared in two Woody Allen films, Cassandra's Dream (2007) and Blue Jasmine (2013); for the latter, she received Best Supporting Actress nominations for the Academy Award and BAFTA Award. She played the lead role in Made in Dagenham (2010), Paddington (2014), Maudie (2016), and Paddington 2 (2017). For starring as a mute cleaning woman in the fantasy film The Shape of Water (2017), Hawkins earned acclaim and received nominations for the Academy Award, BAFTA Award, Golden Globe Award and a Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress.

Hawkins started her career as a stage actress, appearing in productions, such as Romeo and Juliet, playing Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, and A Midsummer Night's Dream. She appeared in stage productions with the Royal Court Theatre in London, and in 2010, she made her Broadway debut in Mrs. Warren's Profession. In 2012, she starred in Constellations at the Royal Court Theatre, which later transferred to the Duke of York's Theatre in the West End. On television, she appeared in the BBC adaptations of Tipping The Velvet (2002) as Zena Blake, and Fingersmith (2005) as Sue Trinder. She also appeared as Anne Elliot in Persuasion (2007), ITV's adaptation of Jane Austen's novel.

San Diego Film Critics Society Awards 2013

The 18th San Diego Film Critics Society Awards were announced on December 11, 2013.

Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Awards 2013

The 12th Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Awards were announced on December 8, 2013.

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