Blondie Purcell

William Aloysius "Blondie" Purcell (March 16, 1854 – February 20, 1912), was an American Major League Baseball player born in Paterson, New Jersey. He played for a total of 12 seasons while playing for eight different teams in two leagues. He appeared in 1097 games, mainly in the outfield, but did pitch in 79 games throughout his career, as well as other infield positions.

On June 6, 1882, while playing for the Buffalo Bisons, he was fined $10 ($260 today) for slicing open a soggy baseball. He did this to compel the umpire to put a fresh ball in play so his pitcher, Pud Galvin, would be able to throw his curveball.[1]

In 1883 he was the player-manager for the Philadelphia Quakers. He took the reins of the team after just 14 games, when they were only 4–13 under player-manager Bob Ferguson, and finished the season with an equally dismal 17–81 record. The 8th-place Quakers finished 23 games behind the 7th-place Detroit Wolverines. Purcell never managed another major-league game.[2] He is the first player to get a hit and also score a run in Philadelphia team history, however, doing so in his first AB of the 1883 season.

Purcell is one of the few players in major-league history whose death is not documented by the Society for American Baseball Research, although according to Find a Grave he has a death date of February 20, 1912, and is buried in Greenmount Cemetery located in Philadelphia.

Blondie Purcell
Blondiepurcell1887
Outfielder
Born: March 16, 1854
Paterson, New Jersey
Died: February 20, 1912 (aged 57)
Trenton, New Jersey
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 1, 1879, for the Syracuse Stars
Last MLB appearance
September 16, 1890, for the Philadelphia Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.267
Hits1,217
Runs767
Teams
As Player

As Manager

See also

References

  1. ^ The Baseball Library Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Baseball Reference – Managerial record

External links

1879 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1879 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 43–37, 14 games behind the Providence Grays.

1879 Syracuse Stars season

After finishing in second place in the International Association in 1878, the Syracuse Stars joined the rival National League for the 1879 baseball season. However, on September 10, with a seventh-place 22–48 record, they folded operations with a handful of games remaining.

1880 Cincinnati Stars season

The 1880 Cincinnati Stars year was a season in American baseball. The club replaced the defunct Cincinnati Reds club of 1879 and finished eighth in the National League with a record of 21–59, 44 games behind the Chicago White Stockings.

At the end of the season, the team was kicked out of the league for their refusal to stop selling beer and renting out their park on Sundays. A different Cincinnati team, the Cincinnati Reds, joined the American Association two years later.

1881 Buffalo Bisons season

The 1881 Buffalo Bisons finished the season with a 45–38 record, good for third place in the National League.

A highlight from this season occurred on September 15. In a 12-inning game against Worcester, Buffalo second baseman Davy Force recorded 12 putouts, seven assists, two unassisted double plays, participated in a triple play, and made just one error in 20 chances.

1881 Cleveland Blues season

The 1881 Cleveland Blues finished the season at 36–48, seventh place in the National League.

1882 Buffalo Bisons season

The 1882 Buffalo Bisons finished the season with a 45–39 record, good for third place in the National League.

1883 Philadelphia Quakers season

The 1883 Philadelphia Quakers season was the first in the franchise's existence. The team was founded earlier in the year as a replacement for the Worcester franchise. It was the first year Philadelphia was represented in the National League since the original Athletics were disbanded in 1876. The American Association's Philadelphia Athletics had been founded a year earlier.

The team opened the year managed by Bob Ferguson; however, he was fired as manager after a disappointing 4–13 start and replaced by Blondie Purcell. The team finished the season 17–81, worst in the National League.

1885 Boston Beaneaters season

The 1885 Boston Beaneaters season was the fifteenth season of the franchise. The team finished in fifth place in the National League with a record of 46–66, 41 games behind the Chicago White Stockings.

1885 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1885 Philadelphia Athletics finished with a 55–57 record and finished in fourth place in the American Association.

1889 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1889 Philadelphia Athletics finished with a 75–58 record and finished in third place in the American Association.

Baltimore Orioles (19th century) all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Baltimore Orioles franchise of Major League Baseball, which played in the American Association from 1882 until 1891 and in the National League from 1892 until 1899. Players in bold are in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Buffalo Bisons all-time roster

The following is a list of players and managers who appeared at least in one game for the original Buffalo Bisons National League franchise from 1879 through 1885.1 - Denotes a player on the 1879 original roster

2 - Denotes the first manager

3 - Denotes a manager

4 - Denotes a Hall of Fame member

Cincinnati Reds (1876–1879) all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Cincinnati Reds franchise, which played in the National League from 1876–1879. For players from the current Cincinnati Reds, see Cincinnati Reds all-time roster.

List of Philadelphia Phillies managers

In its 133-year history, the Philadelphia Phillies baseball franchise of Major League Baseball's National League has employed 54 managers. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Of those 52 managers, 15 have been "player-managers"; specifically, they managed the team while still being signed as a player.The Phillies posted their franchise record for losses in a season during their record-setting streak of 16 consecutive losing seasons (a season where the winning percentage is below .500), with 111 losses out of 154 games in 1941. During this stretch from 1933 to 1948, the Phillies employed seven managers, all of whom posted a winning percentage below .430 for their Phillies careers. Seven managers have taken the Phillies to the postseason, with Danny Ozark and Charlie Manuel leading the team to three playoff appearances. Dallas Green and Charlie Manuel are the only Phillies managers to win a World Series: Green in the 1980 World Series against the Kansas City Royals; and Manuel in the 2008 World Series against the Tampa Bay Rays. Gene Mauch is the longest-tenured manager in franchise history, with 1,332 games of service in parts of nine seasons (1960–1968). Manuel surpassed Mauch for the most victories as a manager in franchise history on September 28, 2011, with a 13-inning defeat of the Atlanta Braves; it was the team's final victory in their franchise-record 102-win season.

The manager with the highest winning percentage over a full season or more was Arthur Irwin, whose .575 winning percentage is fourth on the all-time wins list for Phillies managers. Conversely, the worst winning percentage over a season in franchise history is .160 by the inaugural season's second manager Blondie Purcell, who posted a 13–68 record during the 1883 season.

Philadelphia Athletics (American Association) all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Philadelphia Athletics franchise, which played in the American Association from 1882–1890. Note that this does not include players for the Athletics who played in the AA in 1891, which was a separate, unrelated team.Players in bold are in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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