Blastus

According to the Bible, Blastus was the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa (Acts 12:20), a mediator for the Sidonians and Tyrians,[1] and was believed to be involved in the events that led to Herod's death.

Biblical account

According to Acts 12:20, Herod was displeased with the people of Tyre and Sidon,[2] and forbade the export of food to them. As they were dependent on delivery of food from Judea, and Judea was affected by famine,[3] the Sidonians and Tyrians made Blastus "their friend" (possibly through bribery [4]). Blastus helped them obtain an audience with Herod.

Acts 12:23 states that Herod was struck dead by God when the people of Sidon and Tyre offered him worship.

Other contemporary accounts

The story of Herod's death is somewhat corroborated by the contemporary historian Josephus.[5] However, Josephus does not mention any involvement of Blastus.

See also

References

  1. ^ Elwell, Walter A; Comfort, Philip Wesley (2001). Tyndale Bible Dictionary. Tyndale House Publishers. p. 226. ISBN 978-0-8423-7089-9.
  2. ^ Orr, James; Hunter, S. F. (1939). International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.
  3. ^ Acts 11:28-29
  4. ^ Henry, Matthew; Williams, J. B. (1828). Exposition of the Old and New Testament, Volume 3. Towar. p. 806.; compare Gill, John, Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible http://biblehub.com/commentaries/gill/acts/12.htm accessed 1 September 2015
  5. ^ Brownrigg, Ronald (2001). Who's Who in the New Testament. Routledge. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-415-26036-7.
Archippus

Archippus (; Ancient Greek: Ἅρχιππος, "master of the horse") was an early Christian believer mentioned briefly in the New Testament epistles of Philemon and Colossians.

Blastus (disambiguation)

The word "Blastus" may refer to:

Blastus, the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa in the Bible

Blastus (plant), a genus of plants in the Melastomaceae family

Old Blastus of Bandicoot, a novel by Miles Franklin

Celidonius

For the Spanish saint, see Emeterius and Celedonius.

Celidonius is the traditional name ascribed to the man born blind whom Jesus healed in the Gospel of John 9:1-38. This tradition is attested in both Eastern Christianity and in Catholicism.

One tradition ascribes to St. Celidonius the founding of the Christian church at Nîmes in Gaul (present-day France).

Saint Demetrius of Rostov, in his Great Synaxarion, also mentions that the blind man's name was Celidonius.In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the account of the healing of Celidonius is recounted on the "Sunday of the Blind Man", the Sixth Sunday of Pascha (Easter). Many hymns concerning the healing and its significance are found in the Pentecostarion, a liturgical book used during the Paschal season.

Demas

Demas or Demos is a man mentioned by the Apostle Paul in the New Testament of the Bible, and appears to have been involved for a time in his ministry.Demas is mentioned in three of the canonical Pauline epistles:

In Philemon he is mentioned as a "fellow worker".[Philemon 1:24]

In Colossians he is mentioned along with Luke (the physician and writer of the Gospel of Luke and Acts).[Colossians 4:14]

In Second Timothy, a letter traditionally ascribed to Paul, where it is mentioned that "...for Demas, because he loved this world, he has deserted me and has gone to Thessalonica." [2Timothy 4:10a]Demas is also mentioned in the non-canonical Acts of Paul and Thecla, where he is described as holding views similar to the author of Second Peter. Based on this, Dale Martin speculates that whichever one of the Acts of Paul and Thecla and the Pastoral Epistles (including Second Timothy) was written later may have been arguing against the other.

Demetrius (biblical figure)

The name Demetrius occurs in two places in the Bible, both in the New Testament:

a Diana-worshipping silversmith who incited a riot against the Apostle Paul.

a disciple commended in 3 John 1:12. Possibly the bearer of the letters of 1, 2 and 3 John, Demetrius is commended to the early Christian leader Gaius (3 John 1:11) as one who upholds the truth of the Gospel, and as such should be welcomed and provided for.

Epaphras

Epaphras (Greek: Ἐπαφράς) was an observer of the Apostle Paul mentioned twice in the New Testament epistle of Colossians and once in the New Testament letter to Philemon. In the first instance he is described as a "fellow servant" (Colossians 1:7) of Paul in his ministry. At the end of the same letter to the Church in Colossae, it is noted that Epaphras is "one of them" and that he sends "greetings" (Colossians 4:12) from his current location to the recipients of the letter. There is a similar refrain in Paul's letter to Philemon, where a person of the same name passes on his "greetings" to Philemon (Philemon 23). Douglas Moo, in his commentary about Colossians, writes this about Epaphras: "Little is known about him, though we can infer that he was a native of Colossae and that he was perhaps converted by Paul himself during the apostle's ministry in Ephesus. The mention of a co-worker at this point in a Pauline epistle is unusual, and the strength of Paul's endorsement of him is also striking (note also 4:12-13)."

Eunice (biblical figure)

According to the New Testament, Eunice was the mother of Timothy. Born into the Jewish faith, she and her mother Lois accepted Christianity.

She is mentioned only in 2 Timothy 1:5, where the author writes to Timothy, "I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you as well." (ESV) Many commentators have also connected Eunice to 2 Tim. 3:15, where Timothy is reminded "how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings". (ESV) Albert Barnes, for example, says, "The mother of Timothy was a pious Hebrewess, and regarded it as one of the duties of her religion to train her son in the careful knowledge of the word of God."

Lois (biblical figure)

According to the New Testament, Lois was the grandmother of Timothy. According to extrabiblical Tradition, she was born into the Jewish faith, and later accepted Christianity along with her daughter Eunice.

Her only biblical mention is in 2 Timothy 1:5, where the author tells Timothy, "I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you as well."(ESV) It has been suggested that Lois, Eunice, and Timothy may have been kinsfolk of Paul, hence his apparent intimacy with the family and his knowledge of their faith.Lois has often been used as an example for Christian grandmothers. Dale Evans Rogers suggests that "her example, her teachings, and her faith" were strong influences in Timothy's life.

Mary, mother of John Mark

Mary, mother of John Mark is mentioned in the Acts 12:12, which says that, after his escape from prison, Peter went to her house:

When he realized this, he went to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose other name was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying.

This seems to be the only mention of her in the Bible.

The question whether her son John Mark can be identified with others called Mark or John in the New Testament is discussed in the article about him. Greek scholars reject his identification with Mark the Evangelist and have a separate feast for John Mark in their synaxarion. Catholic scholars are divided on this issue.

Melastomataceae

The family Melastomataceae (alternatively Melastomaceae) is a taxon of dicotyledonous flowering plants found mostly in the tropics (two thirds of the genera are from the New World tropics) comprising c. 165 genera and c. 5115 known species. Melastomes are annual or perennial herbs, shrubs, or small trees.

Nathanael (follower of Jesus)

Nathanael (Hebrew נתנאל, "God has given") of Cana in Galilee was a follower or disciple of Jesus, mentioned only in the Gospel of John in Chapters 1 and 21.

Nicanor the Deacon

Nicanor (; Greek: Nικάνωρ Nikā́nōr) was one of the Seven Deacons. He was martyred in 76.

Nymphas

Nymphas meaning nymph. A man or a woman, depending on accenting of the Greek text, in the New Testament saluted by Paul of Tarsus in his Epistle to the Colossians as a member of the church of Laodicea (Colossians 4:15). Possibly a contraction of Nymphodorus. The church met in his or her house.

Old Blastus of Bandicoot

Old Blastus of Bandicoot (1931) is a novel by Australian writer Miles Franklin.

Olympas

Olympas (Greek: Ὀλυμπᾶς, meaning "heavenly") was a Roman Christian whom Paul of Tarsus saluted (Romans 16:15) in around 65 AD.

Olympas is regarded in the Orthodox Church as being one of the Seventy disciples. His feast day is November 10.

Parmenas

Parmenas was one of the Seven Deacons. He is believed to have preached the gospel in Asia Minor. Parmenas suffered martyrdom in 98, under the persecution of Trajan.Christian tradition identifies him as the Bishop of Soli. Some take this to be Soli, Cyprus, while others interpret it as Soli, Cilicia.

Piotr Blastus Kmita

Piotr Blastus Kmita (died ca. 1632) was a Polish-Lithuanian Protestant printer and writer from the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. He was associated with the Radziwiłł family. He was printer of the works of Symon Budny. Originally his press was in Vilnius but then he moved to Lubča, under the patronage of the Calvinist hetman Christopher Radziwill.

Robotomy

Robotomy is an American animated television series created by Michael Buckley and Joe Deasy. The series ran from October 25, 2010 to January 24, 2011 on Cartoon Network. The series revolves around Thrasher and Blastus, two teenage outcast robots who enter high school at their home planet Insanus. It was produced by World Leaders Entertainment in New York (in association with Cartoon Network Studios), and co-executively produced by Christy Karacas, co-creator of Superjail! and creator of Ballmastrz: 9009. The series was the result of numerous failed pitches to the network by the creators. Production proved difficult for World Leaders.

Simeon Niger

Simeon Niger is a person in the Book of Acts in the New Testament. He is mentioned in Acts 13:1 as being one of the "prophets and teachers" in the church of Antioch:

In the church at Antioch there were prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen (who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch) and Saul.

New Testament people
Jesus Christ
Gospels
Apostles
Acts
Epistles
Revelation

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