Blackberry

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.[1]

Blackberry
Ripe, ripening, and green blackberries
Ripe, ripening, and unripe blackberries,
of an unidentified blackberry species

Rubus fruticosus Luc Viatour
Blackberry flower, Rubus fruticosus species aggregate

Scientific classification
Kingdom:
(unranked):
(unranked):
(unranked):
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Subgenus:
Rubus (formerly Eubatus)
Species

And hundreds more microspecies
(the subgenus also includes the dewberries)

Description

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) "picks with" (i.e., stays with) the fruit. When picking a blackberry fruit, the torus stays with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.[2]

The term bramble, a word meaning any impenetrable thicket, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[3] though in the United States it applies to all members of the genus Rubus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.

The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.[4]

Botanical characteristics

Blackberries are perennial plants which typically bear biennial stems ("canes") from the perennial root system.[5]

In its first year, a new stem, the primocane, grows vigorously to its full length of 3–6 m (in some cases, up to 9 m), arching or trailing along the ground and bearing large palmately compound leaves with five or seven leaflets; it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the cane becomes a floricane and the stem does not grow longer, but the lateral buds break to produce flowering laterals (which have smaller leaves with three or five leaflets).[5] First- and second-year shoots usually have numerous short-curved, very sharp prickles that are often erroneously called thorns. These prickles can tear through denim with ease and make the plant very difficult to navigate around. Prickle-free cultivars have been developed. The University of Arkansas has developed primocane fruiting blackberries that grow and flower on first-year growth much as the primocane-fruiting (also called fall bearing or everbearing) red raspberries do.

Unmanaged mature plants form a tangle of dense arching stems, the branches rooting from the node tip on many species when they reach the ground. Vigorous and growing rapidly in woods, scrub, hillsides, and hedgerows, blackberry shrubs tolerate poor soils, readily colonizing wasteland, ditches, and vacant lots.[4][6]

The flowers are produced in late spring and early summer on short racemes on the tips of the flowering laterals.[5] Each flower is about 2–3 cm in diameter with five white or pale pink petals.[5]

The drupelets only develop around ovules that are fertilized by the male gamete from a pollen grain. The most likely cause of undeveloped ovules is inadequate pollinator visits.[7] Even a small change in conditions, such as a rainy day or a day too hot for bees to work after early morning, can reduce the number of bee visits to the flower, thus reducing the quality of the fruit. Incomplete drupelet development can also be a symptom of exhausted reserves in the plant's roots or infection with a virus such as raspberry bushy dwarf virus.

History

One of the earliest known instances of blackberry consumption comes from the preserved remains of the Haraldskær Woman, the naturally preserved bog body of a Dutch woman dating from approximately 2,500 years ago. Forensic evidence found blackberries in her stomach contents, among other foods. The use of blackberries to make wines and cordials was documented in the London Pharmacopoeia in 1696.[8] As food, blackberries have a long history of use alongside other fruits to make pies, jellies and jams.[8]

The use of blackberry plants for medicinal purposes has a long history in Western culture. The ancient Greeks, other European peoples, and native Americans used the various part of the plants for different treatments. Chewing the leaves or brewing the shoots into tea were used to treat mouth ailments, such as bleeding gums and canker sores. Tea brewed from leaves, roots, and bark was also used to treat pertussis.[8] The roots, which have been described as astringent, have been used for treatment of intestinal problems, such as dysentery and diarrhea. The fruit – having a high vitamin C content – was possibly used for the treatment of scurvy. A 1771 document recommended brewing blackberry leaves, stem, and bark for stomach ulcers.[8]

Blackberry fruit, leaves, and stems have been used to dye fabrics and hair. Native Americans have even been known to use the stems to make rope. The shrubs have also been used for barriers around buildings, crops and livestock. The wild plants have sharp, thick thorns, which offered some protection against enemies and large animals.[8]

Cultivar development

Modern development of several cultivars took place mostly in the United States. In 1880, a cultivar named the loganberry was developed in Santa Cruz, California, by an American judge and horticulturalist, James Harvey Logan. One of the first thornless varieties was developed in 1921, but the berries lost much of their flavor. Common thornless cultivars developed from the 1990s to the early 21st century by the US Department of Agriculture enabled efficient machine-harvesting, higher yields, larger and firmer fruit, and improved flavor, including the Triple Crown,[8][9] Black Diamond, Black Pearl, and Nightfall, a Marionberry.[10]

Ecology

Bee pollinating Blackberry
A bee, Bombus hypnorum, pollinating blackberries

Blackberry leaves are food for certain caterpillars; some grazing mammals, especially deer, are also very fond of the leaves. Caterpillars of the concealer moth Alabonia geoffrella have been found feeding inside dead blackberry shoots. When mature, the berries are eaten and their seeds dispersed by mammals, such as the red fox, American black bear and the Eurasian badger, as well as by small birds.[11]

Basket of wild blackberries
A basket of wild blackberries

Blackberries grow wild throughout most of Europe. They are an important element in the ecology of many countries, and harvesting the berries is a popular pastime. However, the plants are also considered a weed, sending down roots from branches that touch the ground, and sending up suckers from the roots. In some parts of the world, such as in Australia, Chile, New Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest of North America, some blackberry species, particularly Rubus armeniacus (Himalayan blackberry) and Rubus laciniatus (evergreen blackberry), are naturalised and considered an invasive species and a serious weed.[4]

Blackberry fruits are red before they are ripe, leading to an old expression that "blackberries are red when they're green".[12]

In various parts of the United States, wild blackberries are sometimes called "black-caps", a term more commonly used for black raspberries, Rubus occidentalis.

As there is evidence from the Iron Age Haraldskær Woman that she consumed blackberries some 2,500 years ago, it is reasonable to conclude that blackberries have been eaten by humans over thousands of years.

Uses

Nutrients

Blackberries, raw (Rubus spp.)
Blackberry close-up
Close-up view of a blackberry
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy180 kJ (43 kcal)
9.61 g
Sugars4.88 g
Dietary fiber5.3 g
0.49 g
1.39 g
VitaminsQuantity %DV
Vitamin A214 IU
Thiamine (B1)
2%
0.020 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
2%
0.026 mg
Niacin (B3)
4%
0.646 mg
Vitamin B6
2%
0.030 mg
Folate (B9)
6%
25 μg
Vitamin C
25%
21.0 mg
Vitamin E
8%
1.17 mg
Vitamin K
19%
19.8 μg
MineralsQuantity %DV
Calcium
3%
29 mg
Iron
5%
0.62 mg
Magnesium
6%
20 mg
Phosphorus
3%
22 mg
Potassium
3%
162 mg
Sodium
0%
1 mg
Zinc
6%
0.53 mg

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Cultivated blackberries are notable for their significant contents of dietary fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K (table).[13] A 100 gram serving of raw blackberries supplies 43 calories and 5 grams of dietary fiber or 25% of the recommended Daily Value (DV) (table).[13] In 100 grams, vitamin C and vitamin K contents are 25% and 19% DV, respectively, while other essential nutrients are low in content (table).

Blackberries contain both soluble and insoluble fiber components.[14]

Seed composition

Blackberries contain numerous large seeds that are not always preferred by consumers. The seeds contain oil rich in omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) and omega-6 (linoleic acid) fats as well as protein, dietary fiber, carotenoids, ellagitannins, and ellagic acid.[15]

Food

The soft fruit is popular for use in desserts, jams, seedless jelly, and sometimes wine. It is often mixed with apples for pies and crumbles. Blackberries are also used to produce candy.

Blackberries-6383

Wild blackberries picked in May in Texas

Wild Blackberries

Wild blackberries in Virginia

Phytochemical research

Blackberries contain numerous phytochemicals including polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, salicylic acid, ellagic acid, and fiber.[13][16] Anthocyanins in blackberries are responsible for their rich dark color. One report placed blackberries at the top of more than 1000 polyphenol-rich foods consumed in the United States,[17] but this concept of a health benefit from consuming darkly colored foods like blackberries remains scientifically unverified and not accepted for health claims on food labels.[18]

Cultivation

Black Butte blackberry
Black Butte blackberry

Worldwide, Mexico is the leading producer of blackberries, with nearly the entire crop being produced for export into the off-season fresh markets in North America and Europe.[19] until 2018, the Mexican market was almost entirely based on the cultivar 'Tupy' (often spelled 'Tupi', but the EMBRAPA program in Brazil from which it was released prefers the 'Tupy' spelling), but Tupy fell out of favor in some Mexican growing regions.[20] In the US, Oregon is the leading commercial blackberry producer, producing 42,600,000 pounds (19,300,000 kg) on 6,300 acres (25 km2) in 2017.[21][22]

Numerous cultivars have been selected for commercial and amateur cultivation in Europe and the United States.[10][23] Since the many species form hybrids easily, there are numerous cultivars with more than one species in their ancestry.[10]

Hybrids

'Marion' (marketed as "marionberry") is an important cultivar that was selected from seedlings from a cross between 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' (commonly called "Olallieberry") berries.[24] 'Olallie' in turn is a cross between loganberry and youngberry. 'Marion', 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' are just three of many trailing blackberry cultivars developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) blackberry breeding program at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.[10]

The most recent cultivars released from this program are the prickle-free cultivars 'Black Diamond', 'Black Pearl', and 'Nightfall' as well as the very early-ripening 'Obsidian' and 'Metolius'. 'Black Diamond' is now the leading cultivar being planted in the Pacific Northwest. Some of the other cultivars from this program are 'Newberry', 'Waldo', 'Siskiyou', 'Black Butte', 'Kotata', 'Pacific', and 'Cascade'.[10]

Trailing

Trailing blackberries are vigorous and crown forming, require a trellis for support, and are less cold hardy than the erect or semi-erect blackberries. In addition to the United States's Pacific Northwest, these types do well in similar climates such as the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Chile, and the Mediterranean countries.

Thornless

Semi-erect, prickle-free blackberries were first developed at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, and subsequently by the USDA-ARS in Beltsville, Maryland. These are crown forming and very vigorous and need a trellis for support. Cultivars include 'Black Satin' 'Chester Thornless', 'Dirksen Thornless', 'Hull Thornless', 'Loch Maree', 'Loch Ness', 'Loch Tay', 'Merton Thornless', 'Smoothstem', and 'Triple Crown'.[25] The cultivar 'Cacanska Bestrna' (also called 'Cacak Thornless') has been developed in Serbia and has been planted on many thousands of hectares there.

Erect

The University of Arkansas has developed cultivars of erect blackberries. These types are less vigorous than the semi-erect types and produce new canes from root initials (therefore they spread underground like raspberries). There are prickly and prickle-free cultivars from this program, including 'Navaho', 'Ouachita', 'Cherokee', 'Apache', 'Arapaho', and 'Kiowa'.[26][27] They are also responsible for developing the primocane fruiting blackberries such as 'Prime-Jan' and 'Prime-Jim'.[26]

Primocane

In raspberries, these types are called primocane fruiting, fall fruiting, or everbearing. 'Prime-Jim' and 'Prime-Jan' were released in 2004 by the University of Arkansas and are the first cultivars of primocane fruiting blackberry.[28] They grow much like the other erect cultivars described above; however, the canes that emerge in the spring will flower in midsummer and fruit in late summer or fall. The fall crop has its highest quality when it ripens in cool mild climate such as in California or the Pacific Northwest.[29]

'Illini Hardy', a semi-erect prickly cultivar introduced by the University of Illinois, is cane hardy in zone 5, where traditionally blackberry production has been problematic, since canes often failed to survive the winter.

Mexico and Chile

Blackberry production in Mexico expanded considerably in the early 21st century.[19][22] In 2017, Mexico had 97% of the market share for fresh blackberries imported into the United States, while Chile had 61% of the market share for frozen blackberries of American imports.[22]

While once based on the cultivar 'Brazos', an old erect blackberry cultivar developed in Texas in 1959, the Mexican industry is now dominated by the Brazilian 'Tupy' released in the 1990s. 'Tupy' has the erect blackberry 'Comanche', and a "wild Uruguayan blackberry" as parents.[30] Since there are no native blackberries in Uruguay, the suspicion is that the widely grown 'Boysenberry' is the male parent. In order to produce these blackberries in regions of Mexico where there is no winter chilling to stimulate flower bud development, chemical defoliation and application of growth regulators are used to bring the plants into bloom.

Diseases and pests

Blackberry flower (2)
Raindrop on blackberry pale pink flower

Because blackberries belong to the same genus as raspberries,[31] they share the same diseases, including anthracnose, which can cause the berry to have uneven ripening. Sap flow may also be slowed.[32][33] They also share the same remedies, including the Bordeaux mixture,[34] a combination of lime, water and copper(II) sulfate.[35] The rows between blackberry plants must be free of weeds, blackberry suckers and grasses, which may lead to pests or diseases.[36] Fruit growers are selective when planting blackberry bushes because wild blackberries may be infected,[36] and gardeners are recommended to purchase only certified disease-free plants.[37]

The spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is a serious pest of blackberries.[38] Unlike its vinegar fly relatives, which are primarily attracted to rotting or fermented fruit, D. suzukii attacks fresh, ripe fruit by laying eggs under the soft skin. The larvae hatch and grow in the fruit, destroying the fruit's commercial value.[38]

Another pest is Amphorophora rubi, known as the blackberry aphid, which eats not just blackberries but raspberries as well.[39][40][41]

Byturus tomentosus (raspberry beetle), Lampronia corticella (raspberry moth) and Anthonomus rubi (strawberry blossom weevil) are also known to infest blackberries.[42]

Genetics

The loci controlling the primocane fruiting was mapped in the F Locus, on LG7, whereas thorns/hornlessness was mapped on LG4.[43] Better understanding of the genetics is useful for genetic screening of cross-breds, and for genetic engineering purposes.

Folklore

Folklore in the United Kingdom tells that blackberries should not be picked after Old Michaelmas Day (11 October) as the devil (or a Púca) has made them unfit to eat by stepping, spitting or fouling on them.[44] There is some value in this legend as autumn's wetter and cooler weather often allows the fruit to become infected by various molds such as Botryotinia which give the fruit an unpleasant look and may be toxic.[45] According to some traditions, a blackberry's deep purple color represents Christ's blood and the crown of thorns was made of brambles,[46][47] although other thorny plants, such as Crataegus (hawthorn) and Euphorbia milii (crown of thorns plant), have been proposed as the material for the crown.[48][49]

See also

References

  1. ^ Jarvis, C.E. (1992). "Seventy-Two Proposals for the Conservation of Types of Selected Linnaean Generic Names, the Report of Subcommittee 3C on the Lectotypification of Linnaean Generic Names". Taxon. 41 (3): 552–583. doi:10.2307/1222833. JSTOR 1222833.
  2. ^ Gina Fernandez; Elena Garcia; David Lockwood. "Fruit development". North Carolina State University, Cooperative Extension. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  3. ^ Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (6th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 2007. p. 3804. ISBN 978-0199206872.
  4. ^ a b c Huxley, Anthony. Dictionary of gardening. London New York: Macmillan Press Stockton Press. ISBN 978-0-333-47494-5. OCLC 25202760.
  5. ^ a b c d Gerard Krewer, Marco Fonseca, Phil Brannen, Dan Horton (2004). "Home Garden:Raspberries, Blackberries" (PDF). Cooperative Extension Service/The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  6. ^ Blamey, Marjorie (1989). The illustrated flora of Britain and northern Europe. Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 978-0-340-40170-5. OCLC 41355268.
  7. ^ David L. Green. "Blackberry Pollination Images". The Pollination Home Page.
  8. ^ a b c d e f Deborah Harding. "The History of the Blackberry Fruit". gardenguides.com. Garden Guides, Leaf Group Ltd. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  9. ^ "'Triple Crown' thornless blackberry". US Department of Agriculture. 2 February 1998. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d e "Thornless processing blackberry cultivars". US Department of Agriculture. 26 June 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  11. ^ Fedriani, JM, Delibes, M. 2009. "Functional diversity in fruit-frugivore interactions: a field experiment with Mediterranean mammals." Ecography 32: 983–992.
  12. ^ Palmatier, Robert Allen (30 August 2000). Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood. p. 26. ISBN 9780313314360. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "Nutrition facts for raw blackberries". Nutritiondata.com. Conde Nast. 2012.
  14. ^ Jakobsdottir, G.; Blanco, N.; Xu, J.; Ahrné, S.; Molin, G. R.; Sterner, O.; Nyman, M. (2013). "Formation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids, Excretion of Anthocyanins, and Microbial Diversity in Rats Fed Blackcurrants, Blackberries, and Raspberries". Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism. 2013: 1–12. doi:10.1155/2013/202534. PMC 3707259. PMID 23864942.
  15. ^ Bushman BS, Phillips B, Isbell T, Ou B, Crane JM, Knapp SJ (December 2004). "Chemical composition of caneberry (Rubus spp.) seeds and oils and their antioxidant potential". Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 52 (26): 7982–7. doi:10.1021/jf049149a. PMID 15612785.
  16. ^ Sellappan, S.; Akoh, C. C.; Krewer, G. (2002). "Phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of Georgia-grown blueberries and blackberries". Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 50 (8): 2432–2438. doi:10.1021/jf011097r. PMID 11929309.
  17. ^ Halvorsen BL, Carlsen MH, Phillips KM, et al. (July 2006). "Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 84 (1): 95–135. doi:10.1093/ajcn/84.1.95. PMID 16825686.
  18. ^ Gross PM (1 March 2009), New Roles for Polyphenols. A 3-Part report on Current Regulations & the State of Science, Nutraceuticals World
  19. ^ a b Mark J. Perry (7 October 2017). "Mexico's berry bounty fuels trade dispute – U.S. consumers dismiss U.S. berry farmers' complaints as 'sour berries'". American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  20. ^ "Tupy blackberry, at risk due to lack of interest in its production". FreshPlaza. 10 May 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  21. ^ "Press Release June 27, 2018" (PDF). United States Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Northwest Regional Field Office. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  22. ^ a b c "Blackberries". US Agriculture Marketing Resource Center. 1 February 2019. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  23. ^ "Evergreen blackberry, Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission". Oregon-Berries.com. Archived from the original on 4 October 2008. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  24. ^ "Marionberry, Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission". Oregon-Berries.com. Archived from the original on 19 September 2008. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  25. ^ Folta, Kevin M.; Kole, Chittaranjan (2011). Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Berries. CRC Press. pp. 69–71. ISBN 978-1578087075.
  26. ^ a b Folta, Kevin M.; Kole, Chittaranjan (2011). Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Berries. CRC Press. p. 71. ISBN 978-1578087075.
  27. ^ Fernandez, Gina; Ballington, James. "Growing blackberries in North Carolina". North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, North Carolina University Press. p. 2. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  28. ^ Vincent, Christopher I. (2008). Yield Dynamics of Primocane-fruiting Blackberries Under High-tunnels and Ambient Conditions, Including Plant Growth Unit Estimations and Arthropod Pest Considerations. ProQuest. p. 2. ISBN 978-0549964759. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  29. ^ Clark, J.R.; Strick, B.C.; Thompson, E.; Finn, C.E. (2012). "Progress and challenges in primocane-fruiting blackberry breeding and cultural management". Acta Horticulturae. 926: 387–392.
  30. ^ Antunes, L.E.C. & Rassieira, M.C.B. (2004). "Aspectos Técnicos da Cultura da Amora-Preta". Pelotas: Embrapa Clima Temperado (in Portuguese). ISSN 1516-8840.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  31. ^ Bradley, Fern Marshall; Ellis, Barbara W.; Martin, Deborah L. (2010). The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control: A Complete Guide to Maintaining a Healthy Garden and Yard the Earth-Friendly Way. Rodale, Inc. p. 51. ISBN 978-1605296777. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  32. ^ "Growing Raspberries & Blackberries" (PDF). cals.uidaho.edu. p. 29. Retrieved 13 November 2012.
  33. ^ Controlling diseases of raspberries and blackberries. United States. Science and Education Administration. 1980. p. 5. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  34. ^ Waite, Merton Benway (1906). Fungicides and their use in preventing diseases of fruits. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. p. 243. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  35. ^ "Bordeaux Mixture". ucdavis.edu. June 2010. Retrieved 13 November 2012.
  36. ^ a b Ensminger, Audrey H. (1994). Foods and Nutrition Encyclopedia: A-H. p. 215. ISBN 9780849389818. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  37. ^ Shrock, Denny (2004). Home Gardener's Problem Solver: Symptoms and Solutions for More Than 1,500 Garden Pests and Plant Ailments. Meredith Books. p. 352. ISBN 978-0897215046. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  38. ^ a b Doug Walsh. "Spotted Wing Drosophila Could Pose Threat For Washington Fruit Growers" (PDF). sanjuan.WSU.edu. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 August 2010. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  39. ^ Hill, Dennis S. (1987). Agricultural Insect Pests of Temperate Regions and Their Control. Cambridge University Press. p. 228. ISBN 978-0521240130. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  40. ^ The Review of Applied Entomology: Agricultural, Volume 18. CAB International. 1931. p. 539. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  41. ^ R. L. Blackman, V. F. Eastop and M. Hills (1977). Morphological and cytological separation of Amphorophora Buckton (Homoptera: Aphididae) feeding on European raspberry and blackberry ( Rubus spp.). Bulletin of Entomological Research, 67, pp 285–296 doi:10.1017/S000748530001110X
  42. ^ Squire, David (2007). The Garden Pest & Diseases Specialist: The Essential Guide to Identifying and Controlling Pests and Diseases of Ornamentals, Vegetables and Fruits. New Holland Publishers. p. 39. ISBN 978-1845374853. Retrieved 12 November 2012.
  43. ^ Castro, P.; Stafne, E. T.; Clark, J. R.; Lewers, K. S. (16 July 2013). "Genetic map of the primocane-fruiting and thornless traits of tetraploid blackberry". TAG. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. Theoretische und Angewandte Genetik. Springer Nature. 126 (10): 2521–2532. doi:10.1007/s00122-013-2152-3. ISSN 0040-5752. PMID 23856741.
  44. ^ "Michaelmas Traditions". BlackCountryBugle.co.uk. 7 October 2010. Archived from the original on 30 March 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  45. ^ "Michaelmas, 29th September, and the customs and traditions associated with Michaelmas Day". www.Historic-UK.com. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  46. ^ Watts, D.C. (2007). Dictionary of Plant Lore (Rev. ed.). Oxford: Academic. p. 36. ISBN 978-0-12-374086-1.
  47. ^ Alexander, Courtney. "Berries As Symbols and in Folklore" (PDF). Cornell Fruit. Retrieved 11 August 2015.
  48. ^ Hawthorn. Encyclopædia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature, Volume 11; R.S. Peale. 1891.
  49. ^ Ombrello T (2015). "Crown of thorns". Union County College, Department of Biology, Cranford, NJ. Archived from the original on 17 September 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2015.

Further reading

  • Allen, D. E.; Hackney, P. (2010). "Further fieldwork on the brambles (Rubus fruticosus L. agg.) of North-east Ireland". Irish Naturalists' Journal. 31: 18–22.

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On December 15, 2017, BlackBerry announced that there would be at least another two years of support for BlackBerry 10 and BlackBerry OS devices. BlackBerry will end the support for the operating system at the end of 2019.

BlackBerry Bold

The BlackBerry Bold is a line of smartphones developed by BlackBerry, Ltd. The family was launched in 2008 with the 9000 Model. In 2009 the form factor was shrunk with the 9700 and the Tour 9630. In 2010 BlackBerry released the 9650 and 9780 refreshed with OS 6. In 2011 came the 9700 and 9788 along with the 9900/9930 series. The 9900/9930 and 9790 are touchscreen smartphones, released in August and November 2011.

The Bold family is known for its distinctive form factor; QWERTY keyboard, typical BlackBerry messaging capabilities with a different keyboard than the Curve series. The Bold series is usually more expensive and has more expensive materials (e.g. leather, soft touch, carbon fiber, metal) than the Curve (plastic, glossy), and has higher specifications. There are two basic form factors with the Bold line: the original larger size on the 9000 and 9900 Series and the "baby bold" form factor the other models have.

BlackBerry Curve

BlackBerry Curve is a brand of professional smartphones that have been manufactured by BlackBerry Ltd since 2007.

BlackBerry DTEK50

BlackBerry DTEK50 is an Android smartphone co-developed and distributed by BlackBerry Limited, and manufactured by TCL, being a modified and rebranded variant of TCL's Alcatel Idol 4. Unveiled during a press conference held on July 26, 2016, it is BlackBerry's second Android device after the BlackBerry Priv slider. As with the Priv, the DTEK50's Android operating system is customized with features inspired by those seen on BlackBerry's in-house operating systems, and with hardware and software security enhancements (such as the titular DTEK software).The DTEK50 received mixed reviews, with critics noting the quality of its display and BlackBerry's software enhancements, but arguing that BlackBerry's claimed security enhancements were redundant to security features included in the base Android operating system, the lack of fingerprint reader was a questionable exclusion for a device marketed as being security-oriented, and that the device was not sufficiently competitive in comparison to other mid-range devices in its class.

BlackBerry DTEK60

BlackBerry DTEK60 is an Android smartphone co-developed and distributed by BlackBerry Limited, and manufactured by TCL. Unveiled on October 25, 2016, it is BlackBerry's second device in the DTEK series after the BlackBerry DTEK50, and the third Android device after the BlackBerry Priv slider. As with the Priv and the DTEK50, the DTEK60 Android operating system is customized with features inspired by those seen on BlackBerry's in-house operating systems, and with hardware and software security enhancements (such as the titular DTEK software). The DTEK60 features a fingerprint sensor on the rear of the device.

BlackBerry Key2

The BlackBerry Key2 (stylized as BlackBerry KEY²) is a touchscreen-based Android smartphone with a portrait-oriented, fixed (not sliding) integrated hardware keyboard that is manufactured by TCL Corporation under the brand name of BlackBerry Mobile. Originally known by its unofficial codename "Athena", the Key2 was officially announced in New York on June 7, 2018. The Key2 is the successor to the BlackBerry KeyOne, and the seventh BlackBerry smartphone to run the Android operating system. It was released on July 13th, 2018. An entry-level variant, the Key2 LE, was introduced in October of the same year.

BlackBerry KeyOne

The BlackBerry KeyOne (stylized as BlackBerry KEYone) is a touchscreen-based Android smartphone with an integrated hardware keyboard that is manufactured by TCL Corporation under the brand name of BlackBerry Mobile. Originally known by its unofficial code name "Mercury", the KEYone was officially announced at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on February 25, 2017. While earlier BlackBerry smartphones running Android exist, the KeyOne is the first Android-based BlackBerry with the iconic BlackBerry design (having an integrated hardware keyboard fixed below the screen instead of having the keyboard on a slide like the Priv). TCL executives termed the KeyOne as a success, mentioning 850,000 units being sold.

BlackBerry Limited

BlackBerry Limited is a Canadian multinational company specialising in enterprise software and the Internet of things. Originally known as Research In Motion (RIM), it is best known to the general public as the former developer of the BlackBerry brand of smartphones, and tablets. It transitioned to an enterprise software and services company under CEO John S. Chen. Its products are used worldwide by various businesses, car makers, and government agencies. They include BlackBerry Cylance's artificial intelligence based cyber-security solutions, the BlackBerry AtHoc emergency communication system (ECS) platform; the QNX real-time operating system; and BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BlackBerry Unified Endpoint Manager), a Unified Endpoint Management (UEM) platform. BlackBerry was founded in 1984 as Research In Motion by Mike Lazaridis and Douglas Fregin. In 1992, Lazaridis hired Jim Balsillie, and Lazaridis and Balsillie served as co-CEOs until January 22, 2012. In November 2013, John S. Chen took over as CEO. His initial strategy was to subcontract manufacturing to Foxconn, and to focus on software technology. Currently, his strategy includes forming licensing partnerships with device manufacturers such as TCL Communication and unifying BlackBerry's software portfolio.

BlackBerry Motion

The BlackBerry Motion is an Android smartphone manufactured by TCL Corporation under the brand name of BlackBerry Mobile. It was launched on 9 October 2017 in Dubai at the Gitex Technology Week, and first went on sale in the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia on 22 October 2017.

BlackBerry OS

BlackBerry OS is a proprietary mobile operating system developed by Canadian company BlackBerry Limited for its BlackBerry line of smartphone handheld devices. The operating system provides multitasking and supports specialized input devices that have been adopted by BlackBerry for use in its handhelds, particularly the trackwheel, trackball, and most recently, the trackpad and touchscreen.

The BlackBerry platform is perhaps best known for its native support for corporate email, through Java Micro Edition MIDP 1.0 and, more recently, a subset of MIDP 2.0, which allows complete wireless activation and synchronization with Microsoft Exchange, Lotus Domino, or Novell GroupWise email, calendar, tasks, notes, and contacts, when used with BlackBerry Enterprise Server. The operating system also supports WAP 1.2.

Updates to the operating system may be automatically available from wireless carriers that support the BlackBerry over the air software loading (OTASL) service.

Third-party developers can write software using the available BlackBerry API classes, although applications that make use of certain functionality must be digitally signed.

Research from June 2011, indicated that approximately 45% of mobile developers were using the platform at the time of publication.BlackBerry OS was discontinued after the release of BlackBerry 10 in January 2013, however support for the older OS continued until the end of 2013.

BlackBerry PlayBook

The BlackBerry PlayBook is a mini tablet computer developed by BlackBerry and made by Quanta Computer, an original design manufacturer (ODM) It was first released for sale on April 19, 2011, in Canada and the United States.

The PlayBook is the first device to run BlackBerry Tablet OS, based on QNX Neutrino, and runs apps developed using Adobe AIR. It was later announced that the BlackBerry Tablet OS would be merged with the existing BlackBerry OS to produce a new operating system, BlackBerry 10, that would be used universally across BlackBerry's product line. A second major revision to the BlackBerry PlayBook OS was released in February 2012. The PlayBook also supports Android OS applications, allowing them to be sold and installed through the BlackBerry App World store.Early reviews were mixed saying that although the hardware was good, several features were missing. Shipments totaled approximately 500,000 units during the first quarter of sales and 200,000 in the following quarter. Many of the 700,000 units shipped to retailers allegedly remained on the shelves for months, prompting BlackBerry to introduce dramatic price reductions in November 2011 to increase sales. Sales rebounded following the price cuts, with BlackBerry shipping approximately 2.5 million BlackBerry PlayBooks by June 1, 2013. At the end of that same month, the CEO announced the platform would not be further developed.

BlackBerry Priv

The BlackBerry Priv is a slider smartphone developed by BlackBerry Limited. Following a series of leaks, it was officially announced by BlackBerry CEO John Chen on September 25, 2015, with pre-orders opening on October 23, 2015, for a release on November 6, 2015.The Priv is the first BlackBerry-branded smartphone that does not run the company's proprietary BlackBerry OS or BlackBerry 10 (BB10) platforms. It instead uses Android, customized with features inspired by those on BlackBerry phones, and security enhancements. With its use of Android—one of two smartphone platforms that significantly impacted BlackBerry's early dominance in the smartphone industry—the company sought to leverage access to the larger ecosystem of software available through the Google Play Store (as opposed to BlackBerry 10 devices, which were limited to native BB10 apps from BlackBerry World and Android apps from the third-party Amazon Appstore running in a compatibility subsystem), in combination with a slide-out physical keyboard and privacy-focused features.The BlackBerry Priv received mixed reviews. Critics praised the Priv's user experience for incorporating BlackBerry's traditional, productivity-oriented features on top of the standard Android experience, including a notifications feed and custom e-mail client. Some critics felt that the device's physical keyboard did not perform as well as those on previous BlackBerry devices, and that the Priv's performance was not up to par with other devices using the same system-on-chip. The Priv was also criticized for being more expensive than similarly-equipped devices in its class.

BlackBerry Tablet OS

BlackBerry Tablet OS is an operating system from BlackBerry Ltd based on the QNX Neutrino real-time operating system designed to run Adobe AIR and BlackBerry WebWorks applications, currently available for the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet computer.

The BlackBerry Tablet OS is the first tablet running an operating system from QNX (now a subsidiary of RIM).

BlackBerry Tablet OS supports standard BlackBerry Java applications. Support for Android apps has also been announced, through sandbox "app players" which can be ported by developers or installed through sideloading by users. A BlackBerry Tablet OS Native Development Kit, to develop native applications with the GNU toolchain is currently in closed beta testing. The first device to run BlackBerry Tablet OS was the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet computer.A similar QNX-based operating system, known as BlackBerry 10, replaced the long-standing BlackBerry OS on handsets after version 7.

BlackBerry World

BlackBerry World (previously BlackBerry App World) is an application distribution service and application by BlackBerry Limited for a majority of BlackBerry devices. The service provides BlackBerry users with an environment to browse, download and update third-party applications. The service went live on April 1, 2009. Of the three major app stores of different operating systems, it has the largest revenue per app at $9,166.67 compared to $6,480.00 and $1,200.00 by the Apple App Store and Google Play, respectively. On 21 January 2013, BlackBerry announced that it rebranded the BlackBerry App World to simpler BlackBerry World as part of the release of the BlackBerry 10 operating system. BlackBerry devices since 2015 (with the release of BlackBerry Priv) no longer use the BlackBerry 10 operating system but Android instead, which uses the Google Play Store. BlackBerry World is set to shut in 2019.

De Quervain syndrome

De Quervain syndrome is inflammation of two tendons that control movement of the thumb and their tendon sheath. This results in pain at the outside of the wrist. Pain is typically increased with gripping or rotating the wrist. The thumb may also be difficult to move smoothly. Onset of symptoms is gradual.Risk factors include certain repetitive movements, pregnancy, trauma, and rheumatic diseases. The diagnosis is generally based on symptoms and physical examination. It is supported if pain increases when the wrist is bent inwards while a person is grabbing their thumb within a fist.Treatment involves avoiding activities that bring on the symptoms, pain medications such as NSAIDs, and splinting the thumb. If this is not effective steroid injections or surgery may be recommended. The condition affects about 0.5% of males and 1.3% of females. Those who are middle aged are most often affected. It was first described in 1895 by Fritz de Quervain.

Mobile operating system

A mobile operating system (or mobile OS) is an operating system for phones, tablets, smartwatches, or other mobile devices. While computers such as typical laptops are 'mobile', the operating systems usually used on them are not considered mobile ones, as they were originally designed for desktop computers that historically did not have or need specific mobile features. This distinction is becoming blurred in some newer operating systems that are hybrids made for both uses.

Mobile operating systems combine features of a personal computer operating system with other features useful for mobile or handheld use; usually including, and most of the following considered essential in modern mobile systems; a wireless inbuilt modem and SIM tray for telephony and data connection, a touchscreen, cellular, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi Protected Access, Wi-Fi, Global Positioning System (GPS) mobile navigation, video- and single-frame picture cameras, speech recognition, voice recorder, music player, near field communication, and infrared blaster. By Q1 2018, over 383 million smartphones were sold with 86.2 percent running Android and 12.9 percent running iOS. Android alone is more popular than the popular desktop operating system Windows, and in general smartphone use (even without tablets) outnumber desktop use.

Mobile devices with mobile communications abilities (e.g., smartphones) contain two mobile operating systems – the main user-facing software platform is supplemented by a second low-level proprietary real-time operating system whichu operates the radio and other hardware. Research has shown that these low-level systems may contain a range of security vulnerabilities permitting malicious base stations to gain high levels of control over the mobile device.Mobile operating systems have majority use since 2017 (measured by web use); with even only the smartphones running them (excluding tablets) more used than any other kind of device. Thus traditional desktop OS is now a minority used kind of OS; see usage share of operating systems. However, variations occur in popularity by regions, while desktop-minority also applies on some days in regions such as United States and United Kingdom.

QNX

QNX ( or ) is a commercial Unix-like real-time operating system, aimed primarily at the embedded systems market. The product was originally developed in the early 1980s by Canadian company Quantum Software Systems, later renamed QNX Software Systems and ultimately acquired by BlackBerry in 2010. QNX was one of the first commercially successful microkernel operating systems and is used in a variety of devices including cars and mobile phones.

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