Black Buttes

The Black Buttes, also known historically as the Sawtooth Rocks, make up an extinct stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc in Whatcom County, Washington, United States. Glacially eroded remnants of this volcano rise above the Deming Glacier, part of the glacier system of the nearby volcano Mount Baker. There are three major peaks — Colfax, Lincoln, and Seward — which can all be climbed.

The volcano was last active during the mid-Pleistocene from 495,000 to 288,000 years ago. Mount Baker, a much younger volcano, sits on top of lava erupted from Black Buttes Volcano.

Black Buttes
Black Buttes (crop from Mount Baker)
The rocky peaks of the eroded Black Buttes
Highest point
PeakColfax Peak
Elevation9,373 ft (2,857 m) [1]
Coordinates48°46′16″N 121°50′39″W / 48.7712308°N 121.8440353°WCoordinates: 48°46′16″N 121°50′39″W / 48.7712308°N 121.8440353°W[1]
Geography
Black Buttes is located in Washington (state)
Black Buttes
Black Buttes
Whatcom County, Washington, United States

Geography

The Black Buttes represent the remains of a large stratovolcano that once resided in the approximate location of its neighbor, Mount Baker. Black Buttes lies about 1.9 miles (3 km) from Baker,[2] between Baker and the middle fork of Nooksack River,[3] located in Whatcom County, in the U.S. state of Washington.[1][4][5]

The volcano reaches an elevation of 9,373 feet (2,857 m).[1] Its peaks lie next to Coleman Glacier, Thunder Glacier, and Deming Glacier.[3] These peaks include the two principal summits, East Butte, or Colfax Peak, and West Butte, or Lincoln Peak, as well as the third major mountain crest, called Seward Peak.[6]

Colfax Peak

First climbed by David Anderson, Clarence A. Fisher, and Paul Hugdahl in 1921,[7] Colfax Peak or East Butte, reaches an elevation of 9,373 feet (2,857 m).[1] It has a small ice cap on its eastern side, along with a hanging ice cliff on its northern flank, and it consists of extremely steep rock walls.[3] The route up this summit traverses easy slopes, starting at the Mount Baker saddle from the Coleman Glacier Route, and running for about an hour along a lava ridge or snowslopes. The peak's northern flank was first ascended by Ed Cooper and Fergus O'Conner on May 4, 1958, and demanded ice screws. The western side of the northern flank was first climbed by Paul Johanson and S. Reilly Moss in September, 1974, close to the 1958 route, and the trail there lasts for approximately four hours.[7]

Lincoln Peak

Located 0.7 miles (1.1 km) west of Colfax Peak,[3] Lincoln Peak, also known as West Butte, has an elevation of 8,842 feet (2,695 m).[5] It was first ascended by Fred Beckey, Wesley Grande, John Rupley, and Herb Staley on July 22, 1956. The southwestern face can be climbed, and it is accessible by following the cirque on Thunder Glacier from the Heliotrope Ridge Trail, and then rappeling. The climb is technically demanding, lasting 9 hours, and it has significant rockfall hazards. The cirque can also be accessed from Middle Fork Nooksack River Road.[7]

The least accessible of the Black Buttes summits, Lincoln Peak has a 1,000 feet (300 m) northern face as well as a 1,500 feet (460 m)-long face to the east. To the west, Lincoln Peak drops into Thunder Glacier's cirque; its southern side features gullies and ridges.[3]

Seward Peak

Seward Peak has an elevation of 7,825 feet (2,385 m),[4] and it lies 0.7 miles (1.1 km) to the west of Lincoln Peak. First ascended by Dallas Kloke and Bryce Simon on July 11, 1973, it does not require a technical climb. Climbers are recommended to approach as though intending to climb Lincoln Peak, but instead to follow heather to the southwestern ridge before ascending a ridge to a false peak. After another 100 feet (30 m) of ascent, they should reach the summit of Seward Peak, the entire trip lasting about 4 hours.[7]

Geology

Black Buttes is an extinct volcano with an amphitheater shape. It consists of jagged peaks that form an arc-shaped ridge, which were shaped and altered by glacial motion and erosion.[8] Part of its amphitheater and its main eruptive crater is currently taken up by Deming Glacier,[8] the rest of the volcano sitting above the glacier.[9]

Eruptive history

Black Buttes was active during the mid-Pleistocene[10] from 495,000 to 288,000 years ago, producing viscous, andesitic lava flows with a steep dip (the steepest angle of descent of a tilted bed or feature relative to a horizontal plane)[3] that reach thicknesses of up to 1,950 feet (590 m), though they were could actually be larger as they are covered by ice. Its most active eruptive period took place between 350,000 and 330,000 years ago.[8]

During the construction of its main edifice, at least four flank eruptions from satellite vents separate from its central crater generated lava flows. The first three eruptions produced andesitic flows, while the fourth and most recent event yielded lava composed of basaltic andesite. Andesite from the Lava Divide era, the first and longest eruptive period which spanned 460,000 to 296,000 years ago, probably produced a large volcanic cone, but it has now been reduced to a ridge. Lava flows made of andesite from 455,000 to 366,000 years ago were generated from a vent now buried under Mount Baker; at least two have subhorizontal columns indicating that they were settled adjacent to ice, likely from a glacier.[8] Some of the lava flows also contain hypersthene basalt.[2]

In addition to these eruptions traced to Black Buttes, there are five lava flows in the vicinity for which geologists have failed to pinpoint the source vent. These deposits were erupted after Black Buttes went extinct, but before Mount Baker became active. They consist of rhyodacite (dated to 199,000 years ago) and basaltic andesite.[8]

Human history

The Black Buttes were named by Edmund T. Coleman during his ascent of Mount Baker in 1868. He named Lincoln and Colfax Peaks, describing them on August 14 of that year as "black, jagged, splintered precipices."[6] Historian Charles Easton referred to the Black Buttes as a "homogenous mass of black basalt", comparing them to "a Chinese wall".[6] Historically, the surveyor Thomas Gerdine called them the Sawtooth Rocks, a name which was used for a number of maps.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Colfax Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2015-08-18.
  2. ^ a b Wood & Kienle 1992, p. 155.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Beckey 1995, p. 38.
  4. ^ a b "Seward Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  5. ^ a b "Lincoln Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  6. ^ a b c d Beckey 1995, p. 38–39.
  7. ^ a b c d Beckey 1995, p. 39.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Black Buttes – 495,000 to 290,000 years ago". Volcano Hazards Program. United States Geological Survey. 2013-05-15. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  9. ^ "Black Buttes". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2015-08-18.
  10. ^ Harris 2005, p. 353.

Sources

  • Beckey, F. (1995). Cascade Alpine Guide: Rainy Pass to Fraser River. The Mountaineers Books.
  • Harris, S. L. (2005). "Chapter 20: Mount Baker". Fire Mountains of the West: The Cascade and Mono Lake Volcanoes (Third ed.). Missoula, Montana: Mountain Press Publishing Company. ISBN 0-87842-511-X.
Beyers Lakes

The Beyers Lakes are located in the Tahoe National Forest, in California.

They can be accessed via the Beyers Lakes Trail from Grouse Ridge Trail. Grouse Ridge trail can be accessed from the Eagle Lakes trailhead, off of Interstate 80, or from Grouse Ridge Campground.

They sit below the Black Buttes of Grouse Ridge, and are part of the Fordyce Creek watershed draining into Lake Spaulding.

Bone Wars

The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush, was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and the destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival's reputation and cut off his funding, using attacks in scientific publications.

Their search for fossils led them west to rich bone beds in Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming. From 1877 to 1892, both paleontologists used their wealth and influence to finance their own expeditions and to procure services and dinosaur bones from fossil hunters. By the end of the Bone Wars, both men had exhausted their funds in the pursuit of paleontological supremacy.

Cope and Marsh were financially and socially ruined by their attempts to outcompete and disgrace each other, but they made important contributions to science and the field of paleontology, and provided substantial material for further work—both scientists left behind many unopened boxes of fossils after their deaths. The efforts of the two men led to more than 136 new species of dinosaurs being discovered and described. The products of the Bone Wars resulted in an increase in knowledge of prehistoric life, and sparked the public's interest in dinosaurs, leading to continued fossil excavation in North America in the decades to follow. Many historical books and fictional adaptations have been published about this period of intense fossil-hunting activity.

Cascade Volcanoes

This article is for the volcanic arc. For the namesake mountain range see Cascade Range.The Cascade Volcanoes (also known as the Cascade Volcanic Arc or the Cascade Arc) are a number of volcanoes in a volcanic arc in western North America, extending from southwestern British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to Northern California, a distance of well over 700 miles (1,100 km). The arc formed due to subduction along the Cascadia subduction zone. Although taking its name from the Cascade Range, this term is a geologic grouping rather than a geographic one, and the Cascade Volcanoes extend north into the Coast Mountains, past the Fraser River which is the northward limit of the Cascade Range proper.

Some of the major cities along the length of the arc include Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver, and the population in the region exceeds 10 million. All could be potentially affected by volcanic activity and great subduction-zone earthquakes along the arc. Because the population of the Pacific Northwest is rapidly increasing, the Cascade volcanoes are some of the most dangerous, due to their eruptive history and potential for future eruptions, and because they are underlain by weak, hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks that are susceptible to failure. Consequently, Mount Rainier is one of the Decade Volcanoes identified by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) as being worthy of particular study, due to the danger it poses to Seattle and Tacoma. Many large, long-runout landslides originating on Cascade volcanoes have engulfed valleys tens of kilometers from their sources, and some of the areas affected now support large populations.

The Cascade Volcanoes are part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, the ring of volcanoes and associated mountains around the Pacific Ocean. The Cascade Volcanoes have erupted several times in recorded history. Two most recent were Lassen Peak in 1914 to 1921 and a major eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. It is also the site of Canada's most recent major eruption about 2,350 years ago at the Mount Meager massif.

Clarence E. Mulford

Clarence Edward Mulford (3 February 1883 – 10 May 1956) was the creator of the character Hopalong Cassidy and who wrote many works of fiction and nonfiction.

Deming Glacier (Washington)

Deming Glacier is located on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Between 1850 and 1950, Deming Glacier retreated 7,217 ft (2,200 m). During a cooler and wetter period from 1950 to 1979, the glacier advanced 2,060 ft (630 m) but between 1980 and 2006 retreated back 1,140 ft (350 m). Situated on the southwest slopes of Mount Baker, Deming Glacier is bordered by the Easton Glacier to the east and the Black Buttes ridge to the west.

Hondo (film)

Hondo is a 1953 Warnercolor 3D Western film directed by John Farrow and starring John Wayne and Geraldine Page. The screenplay is based on the July 5, 1952 Collier's short story "The Gift of Cochise" by Louis L'Amour. The book Hondo was a novelization of the film also written by L'Amour, and published by Gold Medal Books in 1953. The supporting cast features Ward Bond, James Arness and Leo Gordon.

The shoot went over schedule, and Farrow had to leave the production as he was contractually obligated to direct another movie. The final scenes featuring the Apache attack on the circled wagons of the Army and settlers were shot by John Ford, whom Wayne had asked to finish the film; Ford was uncredited for this work.

List of mountains in Judith Basin County, Montana

There are at least 47 named mountains in Judith Basin County, Montana.

Anderson Peak, 47°03′57″N 110°36′15″W, el. 7,703 feet (2,348 m)

Antelope Butte, 47°10′12″N 110°16′24″W, el. 4,718 feet (1,438 m)

Bandbox Mountain, 46°57′55″N 110°28′59″W, el. 8,097 feet (2,468 m)

Big Baldy Mountain, 46°58′07″N 110°36′23″W, el. 9,183 feet (2,799 m)

Big Deer Point, 46°52′41″N 110°36′59″W, el. 8,146 feet (2,483 m)

Black Buttes, 47°21′21″N 110°33′55″W, el. 4,528 feet (1,380 m)

Blacktail Hills, 47°03′08″N 110°24′54″W, el. 5,732 feet (1,747 m)

Burley Peak, 46°44′43″N 110°18′37″W, el. 6,220 feet (1,900 m)

Butcherknife Mountain, 47°01′06″N 110°33′55″W, el. 7,930 feet (2,420 m)

Cabin Mountain, 46°54′25″N 110°35′14″W, el. 8,189 feet (2,496 m)

Clendenin Mountain, 47°05′53″N 110°36′43″W, el. 7,805 feet (2,379 m)

Coyote Peak, 46°52′32″N 110°35′21″W, el. 7,966 feet (2,428 m)

Gibson Peak, 46°59′47″N 110°28′04″W, el. 8,054 feet (2,455 m)

Granite Mountain, 47°05′14″N 110°29′50″W, el. 7,634 feet (2,327 m)

Grendah Mountain, 46°51′01″N 110°37′07″W, el. 8,176 feet (2,492 m)

Indian Buttes, 47°08′29″N 109°52′08″W, el. 4,229 feet (1,289 m)

Indian Hill, 46°47′46″N 110°17′10″W, el. 6,178 feet (1,883 m)

Irene Peak, 47°06′15″N 110°39′55″W, el. 7,211 feet (2,198 m)

Kelly Mountain, 46°53′31″N 110°29′34″W, el. 8,146 feet (2,483 m)

Lava Peak, 47°24′21″N 110°32′00″W, el. 7,132 feet (2,174 m)

Limestone Butte, 47°10′43″N 110°41′13″W, el. 5,843 feet (1,781 m)

Marys Knoll, 46°59′41″N 110°16′28″W, el. 6,243 feet (1,903 m)

Middle Peak, 47°23′55″N 110°36′38″W, el. 7,018 feet (2,139 m)

Mixes Baldy, 47°05′08″N 110°36′38″W, el. 7,940 feet (2,420 m)

North Peak, 47°24′50″N 110°36′06″W, el. 6,916 feet (2,108 m)

Otter Mountain, 47°07′26″N 110°42′41″W, el. 6,683 feet (2,037 m)

Peterson Mountain, 47°07′35″N 110°34′58″W, el. 7,569 feet (2,307 m)

Peterson Mountain, 47°07′27″N 110°34′56″W, el. 7,707 feet (2,349 m)

Pine Knob, 46°51′48″N 110°12′37″W, el. 6,296 feet (1,919 m)

Red Hill, 46°52′47″N 110°12′33″W, el. 5,974 feet (1,821 m)

Reed Hill, 46°56′09″N 110°15′48″W, el. 6,535 feet (1,992 m)

Sand Point, 46°48′17″N 110°32′30″W, el. 8,218 feet (2,505 m)

Sheep Mountain, 46°56′42″N 110°27′29″W, el. 7,999 feet (2,438 m)

Skull Butte, 47°04′44″N 110°15′56″W, el. 5,364 feet (1,635 m)

Slide Rock Point, 46°53′38″N 110°36′53″W, el. 8,133 feet (2,479 m)

Steamboat Butte, 47°07′00″N 110°16′26″W, el. 4,652 feet (1,418 m)

Stevens Butte, 46°43′16″N 109°53′15″W, el. 6,542 feet (1,994 m)

Taylor Mountain, 47°03′59″N 110°31′31″W, el. 7,693 feet (2,345 m)

Taylor Peak, 47°04′14″N 110°31′11″W, el. 7,789 feet (2,374 m)

Tepee Butte, 46°55′13″N 110°34′52″W, el. 8,228 feet (2,508 m)

Tepee Butte, 46°56′27″N 110°18′59″W, el. 6,647 feet (2,026 m)

Tollgate Mountain, 46°55′52″N 110°22′34″W, el. 7,782 feet (2,372 m)

Tucken Mountain, 46°59′04″N 110°29′02″W, el. 7,572 feet (2,308 m)

Twin Sisters, 46°45′19″N 110°02′38″W, el. 7,395 feet (2,254 m)

Wolf Butte, 47°06′49″N 110°28′07″W, el. 6,690 feet (2,040 m)

Woodhurst Mountain, 46°58′44″N 110°20′04″W, el. 7,382 feet (2,250 m)

Yogo Peak, 46°55′37″N 110°32′44″W, el. 8,812 feet (2,686 m)

List of mountains in Lake County, Montana

There are at least 47 named mountains in Lake County, Montana.

Anderson Peak, 47°03′57″N 110°36′15″W, el. 7,703 feet (2,348 m)

Antelope Butte, 47°10′12″N 110°16′24″W, el. 4,718 feet (1,438 m)

Bandbox Mountain, 46°57′55″N 110°28′59″W, el. 8,097 feet (2,468 m)

Big Baldy Mountain, 46°58′07″N 110°36′23″W, el. 9,183 feet (2,799 m)

Big Deer Point, 46°52′41″N 110°36′59″W, el. 8,146 feet (2,483 m)

Black Buttes, 47°21′21″N 110°33′55″W, el. 4,528 feet (1,380 m)

Blacktail Hills, 47°03′08″N 110°24′54″W, el. 5,732 feet (1,747 m)

Burley Peak, 46°44′43″N 110°18′37″W, el. 6,220 feet (1,900 m)

Butcherknife Mountain, 47°01′06″N 110°33′55″W, el. 7,930 feet (2,420 m)

Cabin Mountain, 46°54′25″N 110°35′14″W, el. 8,189 feet (2,496 m)

Clendenin Mountain, 47°05′53″N 110°36′43″W, el. 7,805 feet (2,379 m)

Coyote Peak, 46°52′32″N 110°35′21″W, el. 7,966 feet (2,428 m)

Gibson Peak, 46°59′47″N 110°28′04″W, el. 8,054 feet (2,455 m)

Granite Mountain, 47°05′14″N 110°29′50″W, el. 7,634 feet (2,327 m)

Grendah Mountain, 46°51′01″N 110°37′07″W, el. 8,176 feet (2,492 m)

Indian Buttes, 47°08′29″N 109°52′08″W, el. 4,229 feet (1,289 m)

Indian Hill, 46°47′46″N 110°17′10″W, el. 6,178 feet (1,883 m)

Irene Peak, 47°06′15″N 110°39′55″W, el. 7,211 feet (2,198 m)

Kelly Mountain, 46°53′31″N 110°29′34″W, el. 8,146 feet (2,483 m)

Lava Peak, 47°24′21″N 110°32′00″W, el. 7,132 feet (2,174 m)

Limestone Butte, 47°10′43″N 110°41′13″W, el. 5,843 feet (1,781 m)

Marys Knoll, 46°59′41″N 110°16′28″W, el. 6,243 feet (1,903 m)

Middle Peak, 47°23′55″N 110°36′38″W, el. 7,018 feet (2,139 m)

Mixes Baldy, 47°05′08″N 110°36′38″W, el. 7,940 feet (2,420 m)

North Peak, 47°24′50″N 110°36′06″W, el. 6,916 feet (2,108 m)

Otter Mountain, 47°07′26″N 110°42′41″W, el. 6,683 feet (2,037 m)

Peterson Mountain, 47°07′35″N 110°34′58″W, el. 7,569 feet (2,307 m)

Peterson Mountain, 47°07′27″N 110°34′56″W, el. 7,707 feet (2,349 m)

Pine Knob, 46°51′48″N 110°12′37″W, el. 6,296 feet (1,919 m)

Red Hill, 46°52′47″N 110°12′33″W, el. 5,974 feet (1,821 m)

Reed Hill, 46°56′09″N 110°15′48″W, el. 6,535 feet (1,992 m)

Sand Point, 46°48′17″N 110°32′30″W, el. 8,218 feet (2,505 m)

Sheep Mountain, 46°56′42″N 110°27′29″W, el. 7,999 feet (2,438 m)

Skull Butte, 47°04′44″N 110°15′56″W, el. 5,364 feet (1,635 m)

Slide Rock Point, 46°53′38″N 110°36′53″W, el. 8,133 feet (2,479 m)

Steamboat Butte, 47°07′00″N 110°16′26″W, el. 4,652 feet (1,418 m)

Stevens Butte, 46°43′16″N 109°53′15″W, el. 6,542 feet (1,994 m)

Taylor Mountain, 47°03′59″N 110°31′31″W, el. 7,693 feet (2,345 m)

Taylor Peak, 47°04′14″N 110°31′11″W, el. 7,789 feet (2,374 m)

Tepee Butte, 46°55′13″N 110°34′52″W, el. 8,228 feet (2,508 m)

Tepee Butte, 46°56′27″N 110°18′59″W, el. 6,647 feet (2,026 m)

Tollgate Mountain, 46°55′52″N 110°22′34″W, el. 7,782 feet (2,372 m)

Tucken Mountain, 46°59′04″N 110°29′02″W, el. 7,572 feet (2,308 m)

Twin Sisters, 46°45′19″N 110°02′38″W, el. 7,395 feet (2,254 m)

Wolf Butte, 47°06′49″N 110°28′07″W, el. 6,690 feet (2,040 m)

Woodhurst Mountain, 46°58′44″N 110°20′04″W, el. 7,382 feet (2,250 m)

Yogo Peak, 46°55′37″N 110°32′44″W, el. 8,812 feet (2,686 m)

List of mountains in Pondera County, Montana

There are at least 28 named mountains in Pondera County, Montana.

Black Buttes, 48°09′46″N 112°17′13″W, el. 4,167 feet (1,270 m)

Bruin Peaks, 48°11′56″N 113°09′05″W, el. 7,703 feet (2,348 m)

Bullshoe Mountain, 48°13′31″N 113°13′32″W, el. 8,008 feet (2,441 m)

Conrad Butte, 48°17′59″N 111°41′25″W, el. 3,668 feet (1,118 m)

Curly Bear Mountain, 48°11′49″N 113°04′50″W, el. 7,903 feet (2,409 m)

Elbow Mountain, 48°10′37″N 113°06′54″W, el. 7,139 feet (2,176 m)

Elkcalf Mountain, 48°17′05″N 113°17′52″W, el. 7,569 feet (2,307 m)

Family Peak, 48°08′55″N 113°01′25″W, el. 8,094 feet (2,467 m)

Feather Woman Mountain, 48°13′40″N 112°57′35″W, el. 7,592 feet (2,314 m)

Flag Butte, 48°26′08″N 112°29′57″W, el. 4,176 feet (1,273 m)

Flattop Mountain, 48°17′43″N 113°19′48″W, el. 6,614 feet (2,016 m)

Goat Mountain, 48°13′08″N 113°08′30″W, el. 8,182 feet (2,494 m)

Half Dome Crag, 48°16′15″N 113°04′46″W, el. 8,045 feet (2,452 m)

Heart Butte, 48°14′31″N 112°55′17″W, el. 6,821 feet (2,079 m)

Kiyo Crag, 48°17′37″N 113°06′29″W, el. 7,743 feet (2,360 m)

Little Plume Peak, 48°16′32″N 113°00′35″W, el. 6,985 feet (2,129 m)

Lookout Butte, 48°28′32″N 112°16′35″W, el. 3,734 feet (1,138 m)

Morningstar Mountain, 48°11′25″N 113°01′50″W, el. 8,376 feet (2,553 m)

Mount Poia, 48°10′57″N 112°59′56″W, el. 8,271 feet (2,521 m)

Mount Richmond, 48°08′26″N 112°56′09″W, el. 8,166 feet (2,489 m)

Running Crane Mountain, 48°14′51″N 113°14′13″W, el. 7,746 feet (2,361 m)

Running Owl Mountain, 48°13′28″N 113°11′42″W, el. 7,828 feet (2,386 m)

Sam George Hill, 48°10′47″N 112°02′20″W, el. 3,947 feet (1,203 m)

Scarface Mountain, 48°10′48″N 113°01′12″W, el. 8,277 feet (2,523 m)

Scoffin Butte, 48°08′43″N 112°41′46″W, el. 5,128 feet (1,563 m)

Split Mountain, 48°08′26″N 112°48′51″W, el. 6,171 feet (1,881 m)

Spotted Eagle Mountain, 48°11′16″N 113°04′21″W, el. 8,038 feet (2,450 m)

Telephone Hill, 48°19′52″N 112°02′22″W, el. 4,019 feet (1,225 m)

List of mountains in Rosebud County, Montana

There are at least 32 named mountains in Rosebud County, Montana.

Badger Peak, 45°38′33″N 106°32′52″W, el. 4,403 feet (1,342 m)

Battle Butte, 45°17′02″N 106°34′56″W, el. 3,343 feet (1,019 m)

Black Buttes, 46°25′25″N 106°27′17″W, el. 2,999 feet (914 m)

Blacktail Butte, 46°47′40″N 106°58′15″W, el. 3,419 feet (1,042 m)

Browns Mountain, 45°22′03″N 106°27′06″W, el. 4,032 feet (1,229 m)

Castle Butte, 46°22′33″N 106°48′11″W, el. 3,077 feet (938 m)

Castle Rock, location unknown, el. 3,113 feet (949 m)

Chalky Point, 45°43′29″N 106°54′33″W, el. 4,445 feet (1,355 m)

Charlie Black Butte, 45°40′50″N 106°33′05″W, el. 4,295 feet (1,309 m)

Cook Creek Butte, 45°26′02″N 106°43′42″W, el. 4,488 feet (1,368 m)

Eagle Rock, 46°32′29″N 107°40′38″W, el. 3,638 feet (1,109 m)

Eagle Rock, 45°55′43″N 106°35′14″W, el. 3,346 feet (1,020 m)

Fisher Butte, 45°33′12″N 106°30′47″W, el. 4,396 feet (1,340 m)

Garfield Peak, 45°41′04″N 106°26′08″W, el. 4,134 feet (1,260 m)

Gobblers Knob, 45°56′29″N 106°18′15″W, el. 3,291 feet (1,003 m)

Gold Butte, 46°40′48″N 106°55′03″W, el. 2,976 feet (907 m)

Horse Creek Buttes, 45°16′08″N 106°17′24″W, el. 4,134 feet (1,260 m)

Ice Cream Butte, 46°24′33″N 106°31′42″W, el. 2,844 feet (867 m)

Jack Creek Hill, 46°19′07″N 106°21′54″W, el. 2,618 feet (798 m)

King Mountain, 45°28′32″N 106°14′19″W, el. 4,160 feet (1,270 m)

Poker Jim Butte, 45°19′28″N 106°21′56″W, el. 4,350 feet (1,330 m)

Pyramid Butte, 45°17′11″N 106°31′07″W, el. 3,917 feet (1,194 m)

Rattlesnake Buttes, 46°45′02″N 107°44′37″W, el. 3,156 feet (962 m)

Rosebud Buttes, 46°10′26″N 106°23′51″W, el. 3,307 feet (1,008 m)

Round Butte, 46°47′52″N 106°39′25″W, el. 3,008 feet (917 m)

Sand Buttes, 46°26′29″N 106°18′26″W, el. 2,894 feet (882 m)

Schoolmarm Buttes, 46°23′28″N 106°37′52″W, el. 2,812 feet (857 m)

Sunday Butte, 46°45′04″N 106°35′40″W, el. 3,156 feet (962 m)

The Big Hill, 46°49′05″N 106°39′35″W, el. 3,189 feet (972 m)

Trembling Butte, 45°49′54″N 106°15′12″W, el. 3,225 feet (983 m)

Twin Tops, 46°31′57″N 107°45′54″W, el. 3,537 feet (1,078 m)

Wild Hog Butte, 45°15′49″N 106°20′53″W, el. 4,114 feet (1,254 m)

List of volcanoes in the United States

A list of volcanoes in the United States and its territories.

Mount Baker

Mount Baker (Lummi: Qwú’mə Kwəlshéːn; Nooksack: Kw’eq Smaenit or Kwelshán), also known as Koma Kulshan or simply Kulshan, is a 10,781 ft (3,286 m) active glaciated andesitic stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc and the North Cascades of Washington in the United States. Mount Baker has the second-most thermally active crater in the Cascade Range after Mount Saint Helens. About 31 miles (50 km) due east of the city of Bellingham, Whatcom County, Mount Baker is the youngest volcano in the Mount Baker volcanic field. While volcanism has persisted here for some 1.5 million years, the current glaciated cone is likely no more than 140,000 years old, and possibly no older than 80–90,000 years. Older volcanic edifices have mostly eroded away due to glaciation.

After Mount Rainier, Mount Baker is the most heavily glaciated of the Cascade Range volcanoes; the volume of snow and ice on Mount Baker, 0.43 cu mi (1.79 km3) is greater than that of all the other Cascades volcanoes (except Rainier) combined. It is also one of the snowiest places in the world; in 1999, Mount Baker Ski Area, located 14 km (8.7 mi) to the northeast, set the world record for recorded snowfall in a single season—1,140 in (29 m; 95 ft).Mt. Baker is the third-highest mountain in Washington and the fifth-highest in the Cascade Range, if Little Tahoma Peak, a subpeak of Mount Rainier, and Shastina, a subpeak of Mount Shasta, are not counted. Located in the Mount Baker Wilderness, it is visible from much of Greater Victoria, Nanaimo, and Greater Vancouver in British Columbia, and to the south, from Seattle (and on clear days Tacoma) in Washington.

Indigenous peoples have known the mountain for thousands of years, but the first written record of the mountain is from Spanish explorer Gonzalo Lopez de Haro, who mapped it in 1790 as Gran Montaña del Carmelo, "Great Mount Carmel". The explorer George Vancouver renamed the mountain for 3rd Lieutenant Joseph Baker of HMS Discovery, who saw it on April 30, 1792.

Point of Rocks Stage Station State Historic Site

The Point of Rocks Stage Station is a former resting place at the meeting point of the Overland Trail and the Union Pacific Railroad in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, USA. It was built as a stop for the Overland Stage Line in the 1861 or 1862, equidistant between the earlier Black Buttes and Salt Wells stations, which were 28 miles (45 km) apart. The station served the stage line from 1862 to 1868. In 1868, the Union Pacific line reached Point of Rocks, putting the stage line out of business. The station then became a freight depot for nearby mines, with a road leading to Atlantic City and South Pass. The freight activity declined, and in 1877, the station became a residence. At one point it was allegedly inhabited by Jim McKee, a former member of the Hole in the Wall Gang. It became the property of the state of Wyoming in 1947 and is administered as Point of Rocks Stage Station State Historic Site.Point of Rocks Station is sited next to the alkaline Bitter Creek, in a valley framed by steep cliffs. The station is a low one-story building, built of local sandstone with mud mortar. The station has burned at least once, and roof construction is a timber structure with metal covering. A stable building is nearby. The station is close to the present-day Interstate 80. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 3, 1970.

Thunder Glacier (Mount Baker)

Thunder Glacier is located on the west slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier descends to the west on the north side of the Black Buttes.

British Columbia
Washington
Oregon
California

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