Biribol

Biribol is a sport, which resembles an aquatic variation of volleyball. It has originated in Brazil, in the city of Birigüi, in the 1960s by Prof. Dario Miguel Pedro. It showed up as a group game and as an alternative to the practice and the learning of swimming. It is the newest sports modality in Brazil and the only group sport genuinely Brazilian, born and instituted inside the country.[1]

Field

Biribol field
Biribol field

Its game is played inside a pool which size is 8m length, 4m width and 1.30m depth (the depth must be this for the entire pool) with a net in the middle of the pool with 2.62m high for the male and with 2.40m high for the female practice. The game space is constituted by 7m high measured from the surface of the water. There is also an attack area, delimited by a line which cross the pool by 1.25m from where the net is in each side. There are lines that delimit the service area, by the end of the pool, 1m from its length limit and other 0.8m from its width limit.[2]

Rules

Game ball

The ball is specially crafted ball similar to that of water polo but with a smaller diameter. The ball weights approximately 100 grams more than the volleyball one and employs a "super grip" surface technology. The official game is played with four players on each side, but there is also the doubles modality, with two players on each side. Biribol is a highly recommended sport for working all muscle groups with practically no injury risks due to its no contact, low impact on joints nature. Biribol is also suited for all ages and genders, and is recommended for people with minor chronic injuries that feel discomfort or pain while playing other sports.

Game play

Matches are decided in best-of-three or best-of-five sets of 21 points, when the matches go up to the last set this set is disputed up to the 20th point instead, and a team needs at least two points of advantage in any circumstance to win a set. So if a 21-points set is drawn at 20x20, the match is extended to 22 points, and so on.

Biriball
A practice of Biribol in São Paulo

The ball can be touched with any part of the player's body, with open or closed hands. The pool's inside borders are neutral, meaning the ball is normally in play after touching them, points are scored when the ball hits the water in the opponents' side or the opponent team commits a fault. As in volleyball, each team can contact the ball no more than three times before the ball crosses the net, while consecutive contacts must be made by different players - except for contacts while blocking, which are not counted. Players also cannot touch the net or they commit a fault and a point is awarded to the opponent team. Unique to the sport is that there is no penetration under and over the net - it is even allowed to block a set being executed in the opponents' side -, the possibility of blocking serves and how there is no lifting (carrying) faults during spikes.

With its fast moving, highly accurate ball and 'closed quarters' action, Biribol is also an extremely competitive sport and enjoys a popularity similar to or greater than water volleyball in southern Brazil. There is currently a Brazilian National League [3] with teams from São Paulo, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul, Goias and Paraná. There are many stages held in different cities of the country, and the Brazilian champion is known in the end of the year, after computing all points of the season. The sport has been reckoned officially in the state of São Paulo, and grows rapidly in the country.

Notes

  1. ^ Montoro, Patricia (2005-06-14). "História do Biribol". EducaRede. Retrieved 2008-08-15.
  2. ^ "Instalações e Equipamentos". Liga Nacional de Biribol. Retrieved 2008-08-15.
  3. ^ "Brazilian National Biriball League". Liga Nacional de Biribol. Retrieved 2009-02-19.

External links

Birigui

Birigui is a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The city is located on the northwest of the state and has 120.692 inhabitants (IBGE/2017) and 530.9 km2 of area.

The name Birigui comes from the Tupi–Guarani language and means "fly that always comes". It refers to the Lutzomyia fly, very common at the area.

The city is known for its children's footwear industry.

Kī-o-rahi

Kī-o-rahi is a ball sport played in New Zealand with a small round ball called a 'kī'. It is a fast-paced game incorporating skills similar to rugby union, netball and touch. Two teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target. The game is played with varying rules (e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. A process called Tatu, before the game, determines which rules the two teams will use.

In 2005 kī-o-rahi was chosen to represent New Zealand by global fast-food chain McDonald's as part of its 'Passport to Play' programme to teach physical play activities in 31,000 American schools.

The programme will give instruction in 15 ethnic games to seven million primary school children.The New Zealand kī-o-rahi representative organisation, Kī-o-Rahi Akotanga Iho, formed with men's and women's national teams, completed a 14 match tour of Europe in September and October 2010. The men's team included 22-test All Black veteran Wayne Shelford who led the team to a 57–10 test win against Kī-o-Rahi Dieppe Organisation, the French Kī-o-Rahi federation.

Shelford's kī-o-rahi test jersey made him the first kī-o-rahi/rugby double international for NZ. The women's team coached by Andrea Cameron (Head of PE at Tikipunga High School) also won by 33–0. These were the first historic test matches between NZ and France.

List of sports

The following is a list of sports/games, divided by category.

According to the World Sports Encyclopedia (2003), there are 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games.

Quidditch (sport)

Quidditch is a sport of two teams of seven players each mounted on broomsticks played on a hockey rink-sized pitch. It is based on a fictional game of the same name invented by author J. K. Rowling, which is featured in the Harry Potter series of novels and related media.[3] The game is also sometimes referred to as muggle quidditch to distinguish it from the fictional game, which involves magical elements such as flying broomsticks and enchanted balls. In the Harry Potter universe, a "muggle" is a person without the power to use magic.

The pitch is rectangular with rounded corners 55 meters (60 yards) by 33 meters (36 yards) with three hoops of varying heights at either end.[4] The sport was created in 2005 and is therefore still quite young. However, quidditch is played around the world and actively growing.[5] The ultimate goal is to have more points than the other team by the time the snitch, a tennis ball inside a long sock hanging from the shorts of an impartial official dressed in yellow, is caught. Rules of the sport are governed by the International Quidditch Association, or the IQA, and events are sanctioned by either the IQA or that nation's governing body.

To score points, chasers or keepers must get the quaffle, a slightly deflated volleyball, into one of three of the opposing hoops which scores the team 10 points.[6] To impede the quaffle from advancing down the pitch, chasers and keepers are able to tackle opposing chasers and keepers at the same time as beaters using their bludgers—dodgeballs—to take out opposing players. Once a player is hit by an opposing bludger, that player must dismount their broom, drop any ball being held, and return to and touch their hoops before being allowed back into play.[7] The game is ended once the snitch is caught by one of the seekers, awarding that team 30 points.[8]A team consists of minimum seven (maximum 21) players, of which six are always on the pitch, those being the three chasers, one keeper, and two beaters. Besides the seeker who is off-pitch, the six players are required to abide by the gender rule, which states that a team may have a maximum of four players who identify as the same gender, making quidditch one of the few sports that not only offers a co-ed environment but an open community to those who do not identify with the gender binary.[10] Matches or games often run about 30 to 40 minutes but tend to be subject to varying lengths of time due to the unpredictable nature of the snitch catch. If the score at the end of the match including the 30 point snitch catch is tied (such that the team that caught the snitch was 30 points behind the other), the game moves to overtime where the snitch is constrained to the pitch's dimensions and the game ends after five minutes or when the snitch is legally caught.

Sport in Brazil

Sports in Brazil are those that are widely practiced and popular in the country, as well as others which originated there or have some cultural significance. Brazilians are heavily involved in sports. Association football is the most popular sport in Brazil. Other than football, sports like volleyball, mixed martial arts, basketball, and motor sports, especially Formula One, enjoy high levels of popularity.

Volleyball

Volleyball is a popular team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules. It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games since Tokyo 1964.

The complete set of rules are extensive, but play essentially proceeds as follows: a player on one of the teams begins a 'rally' by serving the ball (tossing or releasing it and then hitting it with a hand or arm), from behind the back boundary line of the court, over the net, and into the receiving team's court. The receiving team must not let the ball be grounded within their court. The team may touch the ball up to 3 times, but individual players may not touch the ball twice consecutively. Typically, the first two touches are used to set up for an attack, an attempt to direct the ball back over the net in such a way that the serving team is unable to prevent it from being grounded in their court.

The rally continues, with each team allowed as many as three consecutive touches, until either (1): a team makes a kill, grounding the ball on the opponent's court and winning the rally; or (2): a team commits a fault and loses the rally. The team that wins the rally is awarded a point and serves the ball to start the next rally. A few of the most common faults include:

causing the ball to touch the ground or floor outside the opponents' court or without first passing over the net;

catching and throwing the ball;

double hit: two consecutive contacts with the ball made by the same player;

four consecutive contacts with the ball made by the same team;

net foul: touching the net during play;

foot fault: the foot crosses over the boundary line when serving.The ball is usually played with the hands or arms, but players can legally strike or push (short contact) the ball with any part of the body.

A number of consistent techniques have evolved in volleyball, including spiking and blocking (because these plays are made above the top of the net, the vertical jump is an athletic skill emphasized in the sport) as well as passing, setting, and specialized player positions and offensive and defensive structures.

Volleyball variations

Several sports related to volleyball have become popular. Beach volleyball is an event at the Olympics, and sitting volleyball at the Paralympics. Other varieties are localised, or are played at an amateur or informal level.

Water volleyball

Water volleyball (also called pool and acqua volleyball) is a competitive middle-court oriented water game.It can be played between two teams, each team consisting of 1 to 4 players, depending on the area of water in which the game is being played.

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