Bing Miller

Edmund John "Bing" Miller (August 30, 1894 – May 7, 1966) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder, most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics for whom he spent the prime years of his career. Miller was 6' (183 cm) tall and weighed 185 pounds (84 kg) and hit and threw right-handed.

Bing Miller
1921 Bing Miller.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: August 30, 1894
Vinton, Iowa
Died: May 7, 1966 (aged 71)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1921, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
September 5, 1936, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.311
Home runs116
Runs batted in993
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Born in Vinton, Iowa, Miller debuted in the Major Leagues on April 16, 1921 at the age of 26 with the Washington Senators, but in 1922 Miller was traded to the Philadelphia Athletics. He also appeared for the St. Louis Browns and Boston Red Sox.

Miller batted .311 in 1,820 Major League games played with 1,934 hits over the course of his 16-year career, with 389 doubles, 96 triples and 116 home runs. Defensively, he recorded a .972 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions and first base. He's best known for hitting a two-out walk-off double in the bottom of the ninth inning in Game 5 of the 1929 World Series, in which the Athletics won their fourth world championship. Miller was the A's starting right fielder during their three consecutive American League championships, and batted .258 with 17 hits in 18 World Series games from 1929–31. He retired as a player six days after his 42nd birthday.

Miller then continued in uniform as a coach for 17 years after his playing career ended, working with the Red Sox (1937), Detroit Tigers (1938–41), Chicago White Sox (1942–49) and Athletics (1950–53).

Bing Miller's younger brother Ralph Miller (left-handed pitcher) played in one Major League game for the Washington Senators in 1921.

On May 7, 1966, he was injured in an auto accident while driving home after attending Connie Mack Stadium for a game between the Phillies and Pirates. Taken to Presbyterian Hospital in Philadelphia, Bing Miller died six hours after the accident.[1]

References

  1. ^ Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society, Inc.

External links

1922 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1922 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 65 wins and 89 losses. It was the first season since they won the 1914 pennant that the Athletics did not finish in last place.

1923 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1923 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 69 wins and 83 losses.

1924 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1924 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 71 wins and 81 losses.

1926 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1926 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing third in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 67 losses.

1927 St. Louis Browns season

The 1927 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 94 losses.

1928 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1928 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 2nd in the American League with a record of 98 wins and 55 losses. The team featured seven eventual Hall-of-Fame players: Ty Cobb, Mickey Cochrane, Eddie Collins, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, Al Simmons, and Tris Speaker.

1929 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1929 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 1st in the American League with a record of 104 wins and 46 losses. After finishing in second place to the New York Yankees in 1927 and 1928, the club won the 1929 pennant by a large 18-game margin. The club went on to win the World Series over the NL champion Chicago Cubs, four games to one.

1930 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1930 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 102 wins and 52 losses. It was their second of three consecutive pennants. In the 1930 World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in six games. This was the A's final World Series championship in Philadelphia. They would next win the World Series 42 years later, in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland.

When playing the Cleveland Indians on July 25, the Athletics became the only team in Major League history to execute a triple steal twice in one game.

1931 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1931 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 107 wins and 45 losses. It was the team's third consecutive pennant-winning season and its third consecutive season with over 100 wins. However the A's lost the 1931 World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. The series loss prevented the Athletics from becoming the first major league baseball team to win three consecutive World Series; the New York Yankees would accomplish the feat a mere seven years later. The Athletics, ironically, would go on to earn their own threepeat in 1974, some forty-three years after the failed 1931 attempt.

1931 was also the A's final World Series appearance in Philadelphia. Their next AL pennant would be in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland.

1932 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1932 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses. The team finished 13 games behind the New York Yankees, breaking their streak of three straight AL championships.

1934 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1934 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 82 losses.

1950 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1950 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 52 wins and 102 losses. It would be 88-year-old Connie Mack's 50th and last as A's manager, a North American professional sports record. During that year the team wore uniforms trimmed in blue and gold, in honor of the Golden Jubilee of "The Grand Old Man of Baseball."

1951 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1951 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing sixth in the American League with a record of 70 wins and 84 losses.

1952 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1952 Philadelphia Athletics season saw the A's finish fourth in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses. They finished 16 games behind the eventual World Series Champion New York Yankees. The Athletics' 1952 campaign would be their final winning season in Philadelphia; it would also be their only winning season of the 1950s. The Athletics would have to wait until 1968, their first season in Oakland, for their next winning record.

1953 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1953 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 95 losses, 41½ games behind the New York Yankees, who would win their fifth consecutive World Series Championship. It was also the penultimate season for the franchise in Philadelphia.

List of Boston Red Sox coaches

The following is a list of coaches, including role(s) and year(s) of service, for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (1901–present), known during its early history as the Boston Americans (1901–1907).

Ralph Miller (left-handed pitcher)

Ralph Henry Miiler (January 14, 1899 – February 18, 1967) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Miller played in one game for the Washington Senators on September 16, 1921.

Ralph's older brother Bing Miller played 16 seasons in the Major Leagues from 1921 through 1936.

Roger Peckinpaugh

Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh (February 5, 1891 – November 17, 1977) was an American professional baseball player shortstop and manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1910 through 1927, during which he played for the Cleveland Naps, New York Yankees, Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox.

Nap Lajoie discovered Peckinpaugh as a high school student, and signed him to his first professional contract. Peckinpaugh debuted with the Naps, who traded him to the Yankees in 1913. He managed the Yankees for 20 games in 1914 and was the team captain for the remainder of his time with the club. The Senators acquired Peckinpaugh, where he continued to play until his final season, spent with the White Sox. After his playing career, Peckinpaugh managed the Indians from 1928 through 1933 and in 1941. He was also a minor league baseball manager, and served in the front office of the Indians and Buffalo Bisons from 1942 through 1947.

Peckinpaugh was considered an excellent defensive shortstop and strong leader. When he managed the Yankees, he became the youngest manager in MLB history. He was named American League Most Valuable Player in 1925. He played in the World Series three times: winning the 1924 World Series with the Senators, losing the 1921 World Series with the Yankees, and losing the 1925 World Series with the Senators.

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