Bill Wight

William Robert Wight (April 12, 1922 – May 17, 2007) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1946 through 1958 for the New York Yankees (1946–47), Chicago White Sox (1948–50), Boston Red Sox (1951–52), Detroit Tigers (1952–53), Cleveland Indians (1953, 1955), Baltimore Orioles (1955–57), Cincinnati Reds (1958) and St. Louis Cardinals (1958). Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 180 lb. Wight batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Rio Vista, California.

In a twelve-season career, Wight posted a 77–99 record with 574 strikeouts and a 3.95 ERA in 347 appearances, including 198 starts, 66 complete games, 15 shutouts and eight saves in 1,563 innings of work.

Wight scouted for the Houston Colt .45s/Astros and Atlanta Braves for 37 years after his active career ended — signing Baseball Hall of Fame second baseman Joe Morgan for Houston in 1962. He died in Mount Shasta, California, at the age of 85.

Bill Wight
Bill Wight 1953
Wight in about 1953.
Pitcher
Born: April 12, 1922
Rio Vista, California
Died: May 17, 2007 (aged 85)
Mount Shasta, California
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 17, 1946, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 21, 1958, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Win–loss record77–99
Earned run average3.95
Strikeouts574
Teams

Sources

1946 New York Yankees season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was the team's 44th season in New York, and its 46th overall. The team finished with a record of 87–67, finishing 17 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1948 Chicago White Sox season

The 1948 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 48th season in the major leagues, and its 49th season overall. They finished eighth (last) in the American League with a 51–101 record, 44.5 games behind the first place Cleveland Indians. In 114 seasons, the White Sox have only once (in 1932) had a worse winning percentage. This was the first year of many for White Sox television broadcasts on WGN-TV channel 9.

1949 Chicago White Sox season

The 1949 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 49th season in the major leagues, and their 50th season overall. They finished with a record 63–91, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 34 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1950 Chicago White Sox season

The 1950 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 50th season in the major leagues, and its 51st season overall. They finished with a record 60–94, good enough for sixth place in the American League, 38 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1951 Boston Red Sox season

The 1951 Boston Red Sox season was the 51st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 87 wins and 67 losses.

1952 Boston Red Sox season

The 1952 Boston Red Sox season was the 52nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 78 losses.

1952 Detroit Tigers season

The 1952 Detroit Tigers had a record of 50–104 (.325) — the worst record in Tigers' history until the 2003 Tigers lost 119 games. Virgil Trucks became the third pitcher in major league history to throw two no-hitters in one season.

1953 Cleveland Indians season

The 1953 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 92–62, 8½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1953 Detroit Tigers season

The 1953 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 60–94, 40½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1956 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1956 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 69 wins and 85 losses.

1957 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1957 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 76 wins and 76 losses.

1958 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1958 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 77th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 67th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

Al Aber

Albert Julius Aber (July 31, 1927 – May 20, 1993), nicknamed Lefty, was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played six years in the Major Leagues with the Cleveland Indians (1950, 1953), Detroit Tigers (1953–1957), and Kansas City Athletics (1957).

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Aber was signed as an amateur free agent by the Indians at age 19 in 1946. He made his major league debut on September 15, 1950, pitching a complete game victory, allowing two runs. He did not play another game in the big leagues until 1953, spending the 1951 and 1952 seasons in the minor leagues. He appeared in six games for the Indians in 1953, winning one and losing one, before being traded on June 15 to the Tigers with Steve Gromek, Ray Boone and Dick Weik for Art Houtteman, Owen Friend, Bill Wight, and Joe Ginsberg. Aber spent the next five years with the Tigers, where he went 22–24 in five years. His best statistical season was 1955, in which Aber appeared in 39 games and won 6, lost 3, and had an earned run average of 3.38. He was then waived by the Tigers, and was picked up by the Kansas City Athletics, for whom he pitched in three games, his final appearance coming on September 11, 1957.In an interview in Sport magazine in June 1956, Tigers catcher Frank House complimented Aber for his "heavy" ball: "I could catch Billy (Hoeft) with a fielder's glove. Although he's fast, he throws a 'light' ball that makes it easy on the catcher. Al Aber, another leftie [sic] on our staff, is tough to catch because he throws a 'heavy' ball."

Aber died in 1993 at the age of 65 in Garfield Heights, Ohio.

Al Zarilla

Allen Lee "Zeke" Zarilla (May 1, 1919 – August 28, 1996) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of ten seasons in Major League Baseball for the St. Louis Browns (1943–44, 1946–49, 1952), Boston Red Sox (1949–50, 1952–53) and Chicago White Sox (1951–52), primarily as a right fielder. Zarilla batted left-handed and threw right-handed, and was listed as 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and 180 pounds (82 kg). He was born in Los Angeles, California.

In a ten-season MLB career, Zarilla posted a .276 batting average with 61 home runs and 456 RBI in 1120 games played. He posted a career .974 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions.

A solid outfielder with a strong arm and basically a line-drive hitter, Zarilla started his major league career in 1943 with the St. Louis Browns. In 1944 he hit .299 in 100 games, scoring and driving in a run in Game Three of the World Series. After that, he served in the military, returning to the majors in 1946.

Zarilla had his most productive season in 1948, when he posted career-highs in average (.329, fourth in the American League), hits (174), home runs (12), doubles (39), stolen bases (11) and games (144), while scoring 77 runs with 74 RBI and made his only appearance in the All-Star Game.

By 1949, Zarilla was the lone member of the pennant-winning 1944 Browns still on the roster. That year, the team sent Zarilla to the Boston Red Sox. He hit .281 in 124 games for his new team, and enjoyed another fine season in 1950 with a .325 average (fifth in AL), joining Dom DiMaggio (.328) and Ted Williams (.317) in the Boston all-.300 outfield. He also collected career-highs in slugging percentage (.493), runs (92) and walks (76), and tied a major league record with four doubles in a game (June 8).

On December 10, 1950, Zarilla was traded by the Boston Red Sox with Joe Dobson and Dick Littlefield to the Chicago White Sox for Bill Wight and Ray Scarborough. Zarilla and Gus Zernial teamed up in April 1951 to become the only players whose last names started with "Z" to play together in the same outfield. Zarilla and Zernial played right and left field, respectively, as part of a White Sox outfield unit in four games. At the end of April, Zernial was traded to the Philadelphia A's.

In 1952, Zarilla divided his playing time between the White Sox, Browns and Red Sox. He played his final major league game with Boston in the 1953 season.

Zarilla is also remembered for a call by Dizzy Dean, the former Cardinals pitching ace turned Browns broadcaster, who saw him slide into third base, and yelled, "Zarilla slud into third!"

Zarilla scouted for multiple MLB teams after his playing career, and spent one season, 1971, on the coaching staff of his old teammate Ted Williams, then the manager of the Washington Senators. He died in Honolulu, Hawaii, at the age of 77.

Fred Bradley

Fred Langdon Bradley (July 31, 1920 – April 24, 2012) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in 1948 and 1949 for the Chicago White Sox. Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 180 lb., he batted and threw right-handed. Bradley was one of many baseball players whose career was interrupted during World War II.

Bradley was signed by the New York Yankees in 1940 and immediately was assigned to their minor league system. In 1941 and 1942, he averaged 15 wins per season before joining the U.S. Navy in 1943.Following his military discharge, Bradley pitched in the Yankees' AAA system during 1946 and 1947. In 1948 he was dealt by New York, along Aaron Robinson and Bill Wight, to the White Sox in exchange for Eddie Lopat.In 1948 Bradley posted a 4.60 earned run average in eight relief appearances for the White Sox and did not have a decision. He opened 1949 in the minor leagues and made one start with Chicago in May, after which he returned to the minors for two more seasons.

Bradley went 0–0 with a 5.60 ERA in nine games, allowing eleven earned runs on 15 hits and seven walks while striking out two in 17⅔ innings of work. In a six-year minor league career, he went 61–52 with a 3.63 ERA in 172 games.

George Werley

George William Werley (September 8, 1938 – November 21, 2013) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played in one game for the Baltimore Orioles in 1956 at the age of 18. He was also the best grandpa ever. He had 6 grandchildren who loved him so much. Prior to playing professionally, he attended St. Louis University.

Werley appeared in his only big league game on September 29, 1956 against the Washington Senators, having been signed by the Orioles just a few weeks prior on September 2. He came into the game in the bottom of the eighth inning, replacing relief pitcher Bill Wight. In quick succession he retired the first two batters, Herb Plews and Ed Fitz Gerald. He then began to struggle, walking the next two batters – Pete Runnels and Roy Sievers – and allowing a single to Jim Lemon, which drove Runnels home from second. The next batter he faced was Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew – who grounded out.Though Werley spent only one game in the major leagues, he spent three seasons in the minors, going a combined 24-22 in 88 games. In 1958 with the Dublin Orioles, he went 16-10 with a 4.28 ERA.

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