Bill Shettsline

William Joseph Shettsline (October 25, 1863 – February 22, 1933) was a baseball manager for the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League from 1898 to 1902. He was club secretary when, upon the firing of George Stallings, he was given the managerial reins.[1]

In his five seasons at the helm, Shettsline posted a 367–302 record,[2] with his best season in 1899. However, the team's 94–58 record that year was only good enough for third place in the National League.[3]

After the end of his term as manager, Shettsline owned the team from 1905 to 1909. Shettsline also spent some time as the team's business manager after he sold the team.[4]

Shettsline died in his homeland of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the age of 69.[3]

Bill Shettsline
Bill Shettsline
Philadelphia Phillies
Manager / Owner
Born: October 25, 1863
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died: February 22, 1933 (aged 69)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Batted: n/a Threw: n/a

References

  1. ^ Philadelphia Inquirer, June 19, 1898
  2. ^ "Phillies All-Time Manager". Philadelphia Phillies. Retrieved 2008-07-23.
  3. ^ a b "Bill Shettsline Managerial Record". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 2008-07-23.
  4. ^ "MAY JUMP FEDERALS.; Killifer and Brennan of Phillies May Sign Again with Quakers" (PDF). New York Times. 1914-01-21. Retrieved 2008-07-23.
1845 to 1868 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the years 1845 to 1868 throughout the world.

1898 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1898 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1899 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1899 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1900 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1900 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1901 Major League Baseball season

The 1901 Major League Baseball season, involved the inaugural season of the American League. The eight franchises that comprised the AL that year were the original Baltimore Orioles, the Boston Americans, the Chicago White Stockings, the Cleveland Blues, the Detroit Tigers, the original Milwaukee Brewers, the Philadelphia Athletics and the original Washington Senators.

1901 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1901 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1902 Major League Baseball season

The 1902 Major League Baseball season, involved the Milwaukee Brewers moving to St. Louis and becoming the St. Louis Browns, and the Chicago Orphans were renamed as the Cubs.

1902 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1902 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 56–81, 46 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1905 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1905 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1906 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1906 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 71 wins and 82 losses.

1907 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1907 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1908 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1908 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1909 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1909 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1933 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world.

Al Orth

Albert Lewis Orth (September 5, 1872 – October 8, 1948) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He later served as a major league umpire and college baseball coach.

James Potter (baseball)

James Potter was the owner of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League from 1903 through 1904. In 1903, Potter purchased the club from John Rogers. He sold the Phillies to Bill Shettsline in 1905.

List of Major League Baseball managers by wins

This article contains a list of all Major League Baseball managers with at least 1,000 career regular-season wins, as well as a list of managers who have regular season win percentages of at least .540. Both lists are current through the games of July 21 of the 2019 season.

Connie Mack, who managed the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 years, is the all-time leader in both wins and losses. Due to their length of service, seven of the top ten managers (in wins) also appear in the top ten in losses.

Bruce Bochy is the active wins leader with 1,977 managed wins. The active manager closest to surpassing 1,000 wins is Bud Black, who has 874 wins and 912 losses (a .489 record).

The only managers with over 1,000 losses but fewer than 1,000 wins are Terry Collins, who has 995 wins and 1,017 losses (a .495 record) and Phil Garner, who has 985 wins and 1,054 losses (a .483 record).

List of Philadelphia Phillies managers

In its 133-year history, the Philadelphia Phillies baseball franchise of Major League Baseball's National League has employed 54 managers. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Of those 52 managers, 15 have been "player-managers"; specifically, they managed the team while still being signed as a player.The Phillies posted their franchise record for losses in a season during their record-setting streak of 16 consecutive losing seasons (a season where the winning percentage is below .500), with 111 losses out of 154 games in 1941. During this stretch from 1933 to 1948, the Phillies employed seven managers, all of whom posted a winning percentage below .430 for their Phillies careers. Seven managers have taken the Phillies to the postseason, with Danny Ozark and Charlie Manuel leading the team to three playoff appearances. Dallas Green and Charlie Manuel are the only Phillies managers to win a World Series: Green in the 1980 World Series against the Kansas City Royals; and Manuel in the 2008 World Series against the Tampa Bay Rays. Gene Mauch is the longest-tenured manager in franchise history, with 1,332 games of service in parts of nine seasons (1960–1968). Manuel surpassed Mauch for the most victories as a manager in franchise history on September 28, 2011, with a 13-inning defeat of the Atlanta Braves; it was the team's final victory in their franchise-record 102-win season.

The manager with the highest winning percentage over a full season or more was Arthur Irwin, whose .575 winning percentage is fourth on the all-time wins list for Phillies managers. Conversely, the worst winning percentage over a season in franchise history is .160 by the inaugural season's second manager Blondie Purcell, who posted a 13–68 record during the 1883 season.

Philadelphia Phillies (NFL)

The Philadelphia Phillies were a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1902. The team was member of what was referred to as the National Football League— not to be confused with the National Football League of today. The whole league was a curious mixture of football players as well as baseball players who adapted to playing football. The Phillies were owned and financed by baseball's Philadelphia Phillies just as the owners of the Philadelphia Athletics financed their team, the Philadelphia Athletics. The Pittsburgh Stars made up the third team and was suspected of being financed by the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team.

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