Bill Quinlan

William David "Bill" Quinlan (June 19, 1932 – November 10, 2015) was an American football defensive end who played in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cleveland Browns, Green Bay Packers, Philadelphia Eagles, Detroit Lions, and the Washington Redskins. He also played in the Canadian Football League (CFL) for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. Quinlan played college football at Michigan State University and was drafted in the third round of the 1956 NFL Draft.

Bill Quinlan
No. 84, 83, 85
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:June 19, 1932
Lawrence, Massachusetts
Died:November 10, 2015 (aged 83)
Methuen, Massachusetts
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:248 lb (112 kg)
Career information
High school:Lawrence High School (MA)
College:Michigan State
NFL Draft:1956 / Round: 3 / Pick: 37
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:111
Interceptions:3
Fumble recoveries:2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Quinlan was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts and attended Lawrence High School, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball.[1] After graduating high school in 1951, Quinlan attended Staunton Military Academy in 1952 and was inducted into their Hall of Fame.[2]

College career

Quinlan attended and played college football at Michigan State University.

Professional career

After graduating from Michigan State, Quinlan played for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League in 1954.[3] He was then drafted in the third round (37th overall) of the 1956 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns. He joined the Browns in 1957 after serving in the United States Army in 1956.[4] He was traded to the Green Bay Packers in 1959, along with Lew Carpenter, in return for Billy Howton.[5] In 1963, The Packers traded Quinlan and defensive back John Symank to the New York Giants for a high draft pick. The Giants immediately traded Quinlan to the Philadelphia Eagles in exchange for defensive end Gene Gossage.[4]

Personal life

Quinlan's father died when he was four years old, and his mother raised seven children.[1] Quinlan died on November 10, 2015 in Methuen, Massachusetts.[6] He lived in Lawrence, Massachusetts with his wife, Betty, and had previously survived cancer.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Naming of ballpark after ex-Green Bay Packer irks Mount Vernon neighbors". The Eagle-Tribune. Archived from the original on 2013-01-22. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  2. ^ "Staunton Military Academy Hall of Fame". Staunton Military Academy Alumni Association. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  3. ^ "Quick Switch: Quinlan Will Join Packers". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  4. ^ a b "Eagles Obtain Defensive End Bill Quinlan". Reading Eagle. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  5. ^ "Bill Howton". Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2011-11-01. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  6. ^ http://www.eagletribune.com/sports/lawrence-football-legend-wild-bill-quinlan-dead-at/article_60d08b69-465b-55b2-a340-21b6bc44e9b3.html
1955 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1955 Big Ten Conference football season was the 60th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1955 college football season.

The 1955 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 7–2 and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Howard Cassady was a consensus first-team All-American and won both the 1955 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten.

The 1955 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 9–1 record, defeated UCLA in the 1956 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 2 behind Oklahoma in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Earl Morrall was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1956 NFL Draft with the second overall pick. Tackle Norm Masters was also a first-team All-American.

The 1955 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, compiled a 7–2 record and was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll. In the second week of the season, the Wolverines defeated Michigan State, the Spartans' only loss of the season. The Wolverines rose to No. 1 in the AP Poll after defeating Army (ranked No. 6), but after starting the season 6-0, Michigan lost to Illinois on November 5, 1955. End Ron Kramer was a consensus first-team All-American.

Iowa guard Cal Jones won the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in college football. He was the first Big Ten player to receive the award.

1956 NFL Draft

The 1956 National Football League draft had its first three rounds held on November 28, 1955, at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and its final twenty-seven rounds on January 17–18, 1956, at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe previous NFL drafts in the 1950s were held in January; the first three rounds (37 selections) were moved up this year to late November to better compete with teams from Canada.

1957 NFL Championship Game

The 1957 National Football League championship game was the 25th annual championship game, held on December 29 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan.The Detroit Lions (8–4), winners of the Western Conference, hosted the Cleveland Browns (9–2–1), champions of the Eastern Conference. Detroit had won the regular season game 20–7 three weeks earlier on December 8, also at Briggs Stadium, but lost quarterback Bobby Layne with a broken right ankle late in the first half. Reserve quarterback Tobin Rote, a starter the previous year with Green Bay, filled in for Layne and won that game with Cleveland, the next week at Chicago, and the tiebreaker playoff game at San Francisco.

It was the fourth pairing of the two teams in the championship game; they met previously in 1952, 1953, and 1954. The Browns were favored by three points, but the home underdog Lions scored two touchdowns in each quarter and won in a rout, 59–14.Until 2006, this was the last time that major professional teams from Michigan and Ohio met in a postseason series or game. As of 2018, this was the last playoff game played in the city of Detroit other than Super Bowl XL in 2006. The Lions other two home playoff games since 1957 (1991 and 1993) were played at the Pontiac Silverdome in nearby Pontiac, Michigan.

1959 Green Bay Packers season

The 1959 Green Bay Packers season was their 41st season overall and their 39th season in the National Football League and 41st overall. The club posted a 7–5 record in the 1959 season under first-year coach Vince Lombardi to earn a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

It was the Packers' first winning season in a dozen years, the last was a 6–5–1 mark in 1947. Green Bay had just one victory during the previous season in 1958 with the worst record in the 12-team league, and were 3–9 in 1957, tied for worst.

1960 Green Bay Packers season

The 1960 Green Bay Packers season was their 42nd season overall and their 40th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–4 record under second-year head coach Vince Lombardi to win the Western Conference and a berth in the NFL championship game. It was the Packers' first appearance in the title game since winning it in 1944. After a Thanksgiving Day loss at Detroit, the Packers won their final three games, all on the road, to win the crown.

The championship game was against the Eastern Conference champion Philadelphia Eagles (10–2), played at Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Monday, December 26. Two years earlier in 1958, both teams had been last in their respective conferences, winning a combined three games.

In a close game, the Packers led in the fourth quarter, but lost 17–13. Green Bay returned to the title game the next two seasons and won both.

1960 NFL Championship Game

The 1960 National Football League championship game was the 28th NFL title game. The game was played on Monday, December 26, at Franklin Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.In addition to the landmark 1958 championship game, in which the Baltimore Colts defeated the New York Giants in sudden death overtime, the 1960 game has also been called a key event in football history. The game marked the lone playoff defeat for Packers coach Vince Lombardi before his Packers team established a dynasty that won five NFL championships, including the first two Super Bowls, in a span of seven seasons. The victory was the third NFL title for the Philadelphia Eagles, and their final championship until the team won Super Bowl LII in 2018, ending a 57-season championship drought.The American Football League was in its first season and held its inaugural title game less than a week later. First-year NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle convinced owners to move the league's headquarters from Philadelphia to New York City, and with Congressional passage of the Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961 received an antitrust exemption that allowed the league to negotiate a common broadcasting network representing all of its teams, helping cement football's ascendancy as a national sport.This was the second and last NFL championship game played in Philadelphia, and the only one at Franklin Field. A dozen years earlier, the 1948 title game was held in the snow at Shibe Park and was also an Eagles' victory.

Ticket prices for the game were ten and eight dollars.

1961 Green Bay Packers season

The 1961 Green Bay Packers season was their 43rd season overall and their 41st season in the National Football League. The club posted an 11–3 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference and ending a fifteen-year playoff drought. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 37–0 in the NFL Championship Game, the first title game ever played in Green Bay. This was the Packers 7th NFL league championship.

The 1961 season was the first in which the Packers wore their trademark capital "G" logo on their helmets.

1962 Green Bay Packers season

The 1962 Green Bay Packers season was their 44th season overall and their 42nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 13–1 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 16–7 in the NFL Championship Game, the Packers second consecutive defeat of the Giants in the championship game. This marked the Packers' eighth NFL World Championship.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1962 Packers as the fifth-greatest defense in NFL history, noting, "The great 1962 Packers had a rock-solid defense front to back, with five Hall of Famers: defensive linemen Willie Davis and Henry Jordan, linebacker Ray Nitschke, cornerback Herb Adderley, and safety Willie Wood. (They also had 1962 All-Pro linebackers Dan Currie and Bill Forester.) Green Bay gave up just 10.8 points per game, shutting out opponents three times. The Packers held opposing QBs to a 43.5 rating, due, in part, to Wood's league-leading nine interceptions. The Packers' defense allowed the Giants 291 yards in the NFL championship game, but held the Giants offense scoreless as the Packers won, 16–7 (New York scored on a blocked punt)."

The Packers' +267 point differential (points scored vs. points against) in 1962 is the best total of any NFL team in the 1960s. Cold Hard Football Facts says that the 1962 Packers "may have been the best rushing team in the history of football. And that team etched in historic stone the image of Lombardi's three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust Packers that is still so powerful today."

1962 NFL Championship Game

The 1962 National Football League Championship Game was the 30th NFL title game, played on December 30 at Yankee Stadium in New York City. It matched the New York Giants (12–2) of the Eastern Conference and Green Bay Packers (13–1) of the Western Conference, the defending league champions.The Packers were led by hall of fame head coach Vince Lombardi, in his fourth year, and the Giants by Allie Sherman, in his second season. Green Bay was favored by 6½ points. The attendance for the game was 64,892, and the weather during the game was so cold that television crews used bonfires to thaw out their cameras, and one cameraman suffered frostbite. The conditions also made throwing the ball difficult.

Green Bay won 16–7, behind the performances of game Most Valuable Player linebacker Ray Nitschke, and fullback Jim Taylor. Right guard Jerry Kramer, filling in as placekicker for the injured Paul Hornung, scored ten points with three field goals and an extra point. The Giants fumbled twice, with Nitschke recovering both for the Packers, while the Packers recovered all five of their own fumbles and intercepted a Giants pass.This was the third and final NFL title game played at Yankee Stadium; the others were in 1956 and 1958, with the Giants winning the first. There would not be another NFL title game in greater New York City for 51 seasons until Super Bowl XLVIII, which was played February 2, 2014 at MetLife Stadium and resulted in the Seattle Seahawks defeating the Denver Broncos 43-8. Previous championship games hosted by the Giants in New York were played across the Harlem River at the Polo Grounds in 1934, 1938, 1944, and 1946; the Giants won the first two. An additional title game was played at the Polo Grounds in 1936, hosted by the Boston Redskins and won by the Packers.

Bell XV-3

The Bell XV-3 (Bell 200) is an American tiltrotor aircraft developed by Bell Helicopter for a joint research program between the United States Air Force and the United States Army in order to explore convertiplane technologies. The XV-3 featured an engine mounted in the fuselage with driveshafts transferring power to two-bladed rotor assemblies mounted on the wingtips. The wingtip rotor assemblies were mounted to tilt 90 degrees from vertical to horizontal, designed to allow the XV-3 to take off and land like a helicopter but fly at faster airspeeds, similar to a conventional fixed-wing aircraft.

The XV-3 was first flown on 11 August 1955. Although it was limited in performance, the aircraft successfully demonstrated the tiltrotor concept, accomplishing 110 transitions from helicopter to airplane mode between December 1958 and July 1962. The XV-3 program ended when the remaining aircraft was severely damaged in a wind tunnel accident on 20 May 1966. The data and experience from the XV-3 program were key elements used to successfully develop the Bell XV-15, which later paved the way for the V-22 Osprey.

Billy Howton

William Harris Howton (born July 5, 1930) is a former American football player, an end in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons with the Green Bay Packers, Cleveland Browns, and expansion Dallas Cowboys.Howton caught a total 503 career passes for a total of 8,459 yards. In doing so, he surpassed then leader Don Hutson to become the all-time leader in receptions and yardage. (Since then his ranking has fallen to below 50.) Despite this, he has yet to be named a finalist in Pro Football Hall of Fame balloting. He retired after the 1963 season, after four years with Dallas. In 2004, he was named to the Professional Football Researchers Association Hall of Very Good in the association's second HOVG class

Billy Ray Barnes

William Ray Barnes (born May 14, 1935) is a former professional American football player and coach.

Deaths in November 2015

The following is a list of notable deaths in November 2015.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship and reason for notability, established cause of death, reference.

John Symank

John Richard Symank (August 31, 1935 – January 23, 2002) was an American college and professional football player who was a defensive back in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons during the 1950s and 1960s. Symank played college football for the University of Florida, and thereafter, he played professionally for the Green Bay Packers and St. Louis Cardinals of the NFL. He was later the head coach for Northern Arizona University and the University of Texas at Arlington football teams.

Len Ford

Leonard Guy Ford Jr. (February 18, 1926 – March 14, 1972) was an American football player from 1944 to 1958. He played college football for the University of Michigan and professional football for the Los Angeles Dons, Cleveland Browns and Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1976 and the University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor in 1996.

Ford was an all-city athlete at his high school in Washington, D.C., and attended Morgan State University after graduating in 1944. After a brief stint in the U.S. Navy the following year, he transferred to Michigan, where he played on the Michigan Wolverines football team as an offensive and defensive end. He played for Michigan from 1945 to 1947 and was a member of the undefeated 1947 team that has been selected as the best team in the history of Michigan football.

Ford was passed over in all 32 rounds of the 1948 NFL Draft, but was selected by the Los Angeles Dons of the rival All-America Football Conference (AAFC), where he played for two seasons as an offensive and defensive end. After the AAFC dissolved in 1949, Ford played eight seasons as a defensive end for the Cleveland Browns. During those eight seasons, the Browns advanced to the NFL championship game seven times, won three championships, and allowed the fewest points in the NFL six times. Ford was one of the dominant defensive players of his era, having a rare combination of size and speed that helped him disrupt opposing offenses and force fumbles. He was selected as a first-team All-NFL player five times and played in four Pro Bowls.

Ford was traded to the Packers in 1958, but played there just one season before retiring. He worked for the Detroit recreation department from 1963 to 1972. He suffered a heart attack and died in 1972 at age 46.

List of Detroit Lions players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Detroit Lions or for the Portsmouth Spartans (1930–33), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five matches on the NFL regular season. The Detroit Lions franchise was founded in Portsmouth, Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans. In 1934, the franchise moved to Detroit and changed their name to the Lions, which was a play on the name of the Detroit Tigers.

List of Michigan State Spartans in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Michigan State Spartans football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Philadelphia Eagles players

This is a complete list of American football players who have played for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Philadelphia Eagles franchise was founded in 1933. The Eagles played in four pre-Super Bowl Era NFL Championships (1947, 1948, 1949 and 1960) winning three (1948, 1949 and 1960). They have also played in three Super Bowls (XV, XXXIX and LII), winning Super Bowl LII.

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