Bill Osmanski

William Thomas Osmanski (December 29, 1915 – December 25, 1996) was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1973 and in 1977 he was inducted into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame.

Bill Osmanski
Position:Fullback
Personal information
Born:December 29, 1915
Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.
Died:December 25, 1996 (aged 80)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:197 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High school:Providence (RI) Central
College:Holy Cross
NFL Draft:1939 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College of the Holy Cross

After graduating from Central High School in Providence, Osmanski attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. He played fullback for the Crusaders from 1936 to 1938. These three seasons were some of the most successful in Holy Cross' football history with the record of 23–3–3. "Bullet Bill" was named an All-American in 1938. He was named the Most Valuable Player at the College All-Star Game in 1939. His jersey number, 25, was retired by Holy Cross.

Chicago Bears

Osmanski was drafted in the 1st round (6th pick overall) of the 1939 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears. The pick paid immediate dividends for the Bears as Osmanski led the National Football League in rushing in 1939 with 699 yards. The Bears also selected Hall of Fame quarterback Sid Luckman in the 1st round, forming the backbone of the Bears' great 1940s teams, which won championships in 1940, 1941, 1943, and 1946.

With a 68-yard run, Osmanski scored the first touchdown of Chicago's 73–0 victory over the Washington Redskins in the 1940 NFL Championship Game. He rushed for 109 yards in what remains the most one-sided championship game in the league's history.

Osmanski did not play for the Bears in the 1944 and 1945 seasons due to World War II. He served in the United States Marine Corps during these years, in Guam, Guadalcanal, and Okinawa. Osmanski retired from professional football following the 1947 season.

After retirement

Coaching

After his retirement from the professional game, Osmanski became the head coach at his alma mater, Holy Cross. He coached the Crusaders for two seasons, 1948 and 1949, going 6–14.

Dentistry career

During his playing years with the Bears, Osmanski attended dental school at Northwestern University. Following his coaching years, Osmanski opened a practice in Chicago. He died in Chicago on Christmas Day, 1996.

External links

1937 College Football All-America Team

The 1937 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1937. The ten selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1937 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, (9) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (10) the Sporting News (SN).

1938 College Football All-America Team

The 1938 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1938. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1938 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Four players were unanimous All-Americans on all of the major All-American teams: TCU quarterback (and 1938 Heisman Trophy winner) Davey O'Brien, Pittsburgh fullback Marshall Goldberg, Michigan guard Ralph Heikkinen and Notre Dame tackle Ed Beinor.

1939 All-Pro Team

The 1939 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1939 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all six selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bill Osmanski; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann.

1939 Chicago Bears season

The 1939 Chicago Bears season was their 20th regular season completed in the National Football League. They finished second in the Western Division with an 8–3 record. The Bears started the season well, winning 4 of their first 5 games. However, two mid-season losses to New York and Detroit cost them the Division to Green Bay. The Packers went on to win the NFL championship.

1939 NFL season

The 1939 NFL season was the 20th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, NFL president Joseph Carr died, and Carl Storck was named to replace him.

An NFL game was televised for the first time when NBC broadcast a Brooklyn Dodgers–Philadelphia Eagles game. The experimental broadcast was broadcast only to viewers in New York and Albany; regular broadcasting of NFL games would not begin until 1951.

The season ended when the Green Bay Packers defeated the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game.

1940 NFL Championship Game

The 1940 National Football League Championship Game, sometimes referred to as 73–0, was the eighth title game of the National Football League (NFL), played at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. on December 8, with a sellout capacity attendance of 36,034.The Chicago Bears (8–3) of the Western Division met the Washington Redskins (9–2), champions of the Eastern Division. Neither team had played in the title game since 1937, when the Redskins won a close game at Chicago's Wrigley Field. For this game in Washington, the Bears entered as slight favorites.The Bears scored eleven touchdowns and won 73–0, the most one-sided victory in NFL history. The game was broadcast on radio by Mutual Broadcasting System, the first NFL title game broadcast nationwide.

1940 National Football League All-Star Game (January)

The 1940 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's second all-star game. The game pitted the Green Bay Packers, the league's champion for the 1939 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1940, at Gilmore Stadium in Los Angeles, California in front of 18,000 fans. The Packers defeated the all-stars by a score of 16–7. The game was originally scheduled to be played on the previous Sunday, but it was delayed due to rain.The players on the all-star squad were selected by a national poll of fans. Wilbur Crowell was the referee for the game.

1941 All-Pro Team

The 1941 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1941 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by a committee of professional football writers for the NFL (NFL), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were named to the first team by all six selectors: Green Bay Packers halfback Cecil Isbell; Chicago Bears halfback George McAfee; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann; and Chicago Bears center Bulldog Turner.

1946 Chicago Bears season

The 1946 Chicago Bears season was their 27th regular season and ninth postseason appearance in the National Football League.

The club posted an 8–2–1 record under head coach George Halas making his return from World War II en route to a Western Division title and an appearance in the NFL Championship Game. In the title game, the Bears defeated the New York Giants for their seventh league title and their fourth of the decade.

Atom Bowl

The Atom Bowl or Atomic Bowl was an American football game played in Nagasaki, Japan on January 1, 1946 between units of the United States Marine Corps. The Nagasaki Bears, led by professional star "Bullet" Bill Osmanski of the Chicago Bears, defeated the Isahaya Tigers, captained by 1943 Heisman Trophy winner Angelo Bertelli, 14-13 in the first and only contest.

Bob Chesney

Robert Chesney Jr. (born August 10, 1977) is an American football coach. On December 14, 2017, he was named the 28th head football coach at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.A graduate of Dickinson College, Chesney was previously the head coach at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts from 2013 to 2017, leading the Greyhounds to three consecutive NCAA Division II playoff appearances in the last three years of his tenure.Prior to that, he was the head coach at Division III Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island from 2010 to 2012.

George McAfee

George Anderson McAfee (March 13, 1918 – March 4, 2009) was a professional American football player. He played halfback and defensive back for the Chicago Bears from 1940 to 1941 and 1945 to 1950. As an undergraduate at Duke University, McAfee starred in baseball and track and field as well as college football. McAfee was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. As of 2018, he still holds the NFL record for punt return average in a career.

Harry Von Kersberg

Harry Edwin Von Kersburg was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1913, compiling a record of 3–6. Kersburg was a football player and later an assistant coach at Harvard University.

Holy Cross Crusaders football

The Holy Cross Crusaders football team is the collegiate American football program of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Patriot League, an NCAA Division I conference that participates in Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). The team plays their home games at Fitton Field.

Joe Sheeketski

Joseph L. Sheeketski (April 15, 1908 – April 22, 1995) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the College of the Holy Cross from 1939 to 1941 and at the University of Nevada, Reno from 1947 to 1950, compiling a career college football record of 39–29–3.

List of Holy Cross Crusaders in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Holy Cross Crusaders football players in the NFL Draft.

Mark Duffner

Mark Duffner (born July 19, 1953) is an American football coach who is currently a senior defensive assistant for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). Duffner served as the head coach of the Maryland Terrapins football team from 1992 to 1996.

Prior to Maryland, Duffner served as the head coach at the College of the Holy Cross where he compiled a 60–5–1 record. At Maryland, Duffner compiled a 20–35 record. His most important legacy at Maryland has been in the record books; most of the Terps' longstanding single game, season, and career passing and receiving record were broken during his tenure. This was due to the implementation of his run and shoot offense and quarterbacks John Kaleo, Scott Milanovich, and Brian Cummings. However, his teams were notoriously weak on defense, frequently giving up points so fast that even his prolific offense couldn't keep up. Duffner's only winning season came in 1995 when the Terps finished with a 6–5 record and started with four consecutive wins.

After leaving Maryland, Duffner became an assistant with the Cincinnati Bengals from 1997 to 2002, where he served as linebackers coach and then defensive coordinator. From 2003 to 2005, he served with the Green Bay Packers. In early 2006, he was signed by the Jacksonville Jaguars as the linebackers coach. He was hired by the Miami Dolphins in January to be their LB Coach for the 2014 season. On October 15, 2018 Duffner was named as the new defensive coordinator of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

National Football League 1940s All-Decade Team

This is a list of all NFL players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1940s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame retroactively in 1969 to mark the league's 50th anniversary.

Notes:

1 Team belonged to both the National Football Conference and the All-America Football Conference at different times

2 The Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers were merged into one team for the 1943 season due to World War II

3 Three-time finalist to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Neil Wheelwright

Neil S. Wheelwright (born August 20, 1932) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Colgate University from 1968 to 1975 and at the College of the Holy Cross form 1976 to 1980, compiling a career college football coaching record of 61–72–2.

Bill Osmanski—championships, awards, and honors

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