Bill Nankivell

William Field Nankivell (born 7 September 1923) was an Australian politician.

He was born in Mount Gambier and served in the Royal Australian Air Force[1] during World War II from 1944 to 1945. He was a farmer and company director before entering politics. He represented the South Australian House of Assembly seats of Albert from 1959 to 1970 and Mallee from 1970 to 1979 for the Liberal and Country League and Liberal Party. He was a member of the Parliamentary Committee on Land Settlement (1963–1968), Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works (1968–1973) and Public Accounts Committee (1973–1977).[2][3]

References

  1. ^ Nankivell, a Family Affair. A. Williams. 1986. ISBN 9781862521209.
  2. ^ William Nankivell: SA Parliament
  3. ^ "Nankivell, William Field". RSL Virtual War Memorial.
Parliament of South Australia
Preceded by
Malcolm McIntosh
Member for Albert
1959–1970
Seat abolished
New seat Member for Mallee
1970–1979
Succeeded by
Peter Lewis
1959 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 7 March 1959. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League led by Premier of South Australia Thomas Playford IV defeated the Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Mick O'Halloran.

1962 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 3 March 1962. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League led by Premier of South Australia Thomas Playford IV defeated the Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Frank Walsh.

1968 South Australian state election

The 1968 South Australian State election was held in South Australia on 2 March 1968. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election; 38 of the 39 contests were won by candidates from Australia's two major political parties. The incumbent Australian Labor Party (led by Premier of South Australia Don Dunstan) and the Liberal and Country League (led by Leader of the Opposition Steele Hall) both won 19 seats. The sole independent candidate to win a race, Tom Stott of the Ridley electorate, joined with the LCL's 19 seats to form a coalition government that held a 20 to 19 majority, thus defeating the Dunstan ALP government.

1970 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 30 May 1970. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League led by Premier of South Australia Steele Hall was defeated by the Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Don Dunstan.

1973 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 10 March 1973. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Premier of South Australia Don Dunstan won a second term in government, defeating the Liberal and Country League led by Leader of the Opposition Bruce Eastick.

Candidates of the 1973 South Australian state election

This article provides information on candidates who stood for the 1973 South Australian state election, held on 10 March 1973.

Candidates of the 1975 South Australian state election

This article provides information on candidates who stood for the 1975 South Australian state election, held on 12 July 1975.

Since the previous election, the Liberal and Country League had formally become the South Australian branch of the Liberal Party. However, the breakaway Liberal Movement also contested the election with several sitting members. Seats won by the LCL in 1973 are listed below as Liberal-held, except for Goyder which had been won by the LM at a by-election.

Candidates of the 1977 South Australian state election

This article provides information on candidates who stood for the 1977 South Australian state election, held on 17 September 1977.

The Liberal Movement had dissolved since the previous election, with some of its members rejoining the Liberal Party and others forming part of the new Australian Democrats. For the two sitting LM members, their seats are listed as held by the LM.

Electoral district of Albert (South Australia)

Albert was a electoral district of the House of Assembly in South Australia, spanning its time as both a colony and a state. It was created in 1875, taking much territory from adjacent Victoria, merged with Victoria in 1902 as Victoria and Albert, separated again in 1915, and abolished in 1970.In 1875, Albert had booths at Bordertown, Kingston, Meningie, Naracoorte, Robe and Wellington East. It added booths at Lucindale (1878), Mannum East (1884), Wolseley (1885) and Mundulla (1887). It lost the Mannum East booth in 1890, but added further booths at Frances, Glenroy and Keith in 1893, at which time the Naracoorte booth was also renamed Kincraig. In 1896, Albert also added booths at Conmurra, Holder, Kingston On Murray, Lyrup, Murtho, Point McLeay, Pyap and Waikerie, but lost Glenroy. It regained a Glenroy booth and added Cookes Plains in 1899. It was then merged with Victoria as Victoria and Albert from the 1902 state election.The recreated Albert seat in 1915 had booths at Alawoona, Berri, Bogg Flat, Borrika, Chapman Bore, Cookes Plains, Coomandook, Clarfield, Coonalpyn, East Wellington, Geranium, Glenope, Hooper, Karoonda, Lameroo, Loxton, Lyrup, Marmon Jabuk, Meningie, Moorlands, Netherton, Notts Well, Paisley, Pangira, Parilla, Parrakie, Paruna, Peake, Point McLeay, Poyntz Bore, Pinnaroo, Pyap West, Sandalwood, Sherlock, Swan Reach, Tailem Bend, Taplan, Tintinara, Waikerie, Wanbi, West Wellington and Wilkawatt.In 1938, the House of Assembly changed from multi-member to single-member districts, and Albert was redistributed as a smaller district along significantly district boundaries, losing territory along the Murray River to the new seats of Chaffey and Ridley and the redistributed Murray. The new Albert had booths at Ashville, Bordertown, Buccleuch, Cannawigara, Clanfield, Cookes Plains, Coomandook, Coonalpyn, Cotton, Custon, Geranium, Gurrai, Jabuk, Karte, Ki Ki, Kulkami, Keith, Kongal, Lameroo, Meningie, Moorlands, Mulpata North, Mundalla, Narrung, Netherton, Padthaway, Parilla, Parrakie, Peake, Peebinga, Pinnaroo, Point McLeay, Sherlock, Tintinara, Wilkawatt, Wirrega and Wolseley.

Electoral district of Mallee

Mallee was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia from 1970 to 1985.Mallee was abolished at the 1983 boundary redistribution, replaced by the Electoral district of Murray-Mallee from 1985. The last member for Mallee, Peter Lewis, went on to represent Murray-Mallee from December 1985.

Malcolm McIntosh (politician)

Sir Malcolm McIntosh KBE (3 March 1888 – 15 November 1960) was an Australian politician who represented the South Australian House of Assembly seat of Albert from 1921 to 1959. He represented three different parties: the Country Party (1921-1928), the Liberal Federation (1928-1932) and the merged Liberal and Country League (1932-1959).In 1956 he was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE).

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1959–1962

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1959 to 1962, as elected at the 1959 state election:

1 The LCL member for Light, George Hambour, died on 25 March 1960. LCL candidate Leslie Nicholson won the resulting by-election on 23 April.

2 The Labor member for Frome and Opposition Leader Mick O'Halloran died on 22 September 1960. Labor candidate Tom Casey won the resulting by-election on 5 November.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1962–1965

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1962 to 1965, as elected at the 1962 state election:

1 The Labor member for Mount Gambier, Ron Ralston, died on 30 October 1962. Labor candidate Allan Burdon won the resulting by-election on 15 December 1962.

2 The LCL member for Yorke Peninsula, Sir Cecil Hincks, died on 1 January 1963. LCL candidate James Ferguson won the resulting by-election on 9 February 1963.

3 The LCL member for Stirling, William Jenkins, died on 30 August 1963. LCL candidate William McAnaney won the resulting by-election on 28 September 1963.

4 The Labor member for Semaphore, Harold Tapping, died on 6 September 1964. Labor candidate Reg Hurst won the resulting by-election on 3 October 1964.

5 The member for Burra, Percy Quirke, was elected as an independent in 1962, but joined the LCL and entered the ministry in 1963.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1968–1970

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1968 to 1970, as elected at the 1968 state election:

1 The narrow re-election of the Labor member for Millicent, Des Corcoran, was overturned by the Court of Disputed Returns on 28 May 1968. Corcoran won the resulting by-election on 22 June 1968.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1970–1973

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1970 to 1973, as elected at the 1970 state election:

1 The Labor member for Adelaide, Sam Lawn, died on 25 May 1971. Labor candidate Jack Wright won the resulting by-election on 3 July 1971.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1973–1975

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1973 to 1975, as elected at the 1973 state election:

1 The LCL members for Goyder and Mitcham, Steele Hall and Robin Millhouse, resigned from the party in March 1973 and formed the Liberal Movement.

2 The Labor member for Semaphore, Reg Hurst, died on 31 March 1973. Labor candidate Jack Olson won the resulting by-election on 2 June 1973.

3 The Liberal Movement member for Goyder, Steele Hall, resigned on 11 April 1974 in order to run for the Australian Senate at the 1974 federal election. Liberal Movement candidate David Boundy won the resulting by-election on 8 June 1974.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1975–1977

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1975 to 1977, as elected at the 1975 state election:

1 The Country Party renamed itself to the National Country Party during the course of this term..

2 The Liberal Movement voted to rejoin the Liberal Party in May 1976, with one of its two MHAs, David Boundy, following suit. The second MHA, Robin Millhouse, who had fiercely opposed the merger, immediately founded a new party, the New LM, and served as its sole representative in the House of Assembly.

South Australian House of Assembly

The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of South Australia. The other is the Legislative Council. It sits in Parliament House in the state capital, Adelaide.

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