Bill Lueck

William "Bill" Lueck (born April 7, 1946) is a former guard in the National Football League who played 98 games for the Green Bay Packers and eleven games for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Lueck was the 26th overall pick of the 1968 NFL/AFL Draft out of the University of Arizona, played eight seasons in the NFL, and retired prior to the 1976 season. When hall of famer Jerry Kramer retired after the 1968 season, Lueck succeeded him at right guard for the Packers in 1969.[1]

Bill Lueck
No. 62
Position:Offensive guard
Personal information
Born:April 7, 1946 (age 72)
Buckeye, Arizona
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Agua Fria (Avondale, Arizona)
College:Arizona
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 26
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ Hendricks, Martin (January 18, 2012). "Lueck had strong presence". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved August 2, 2018.

External links

1968 Green Bay Packers season

The 1968 Green Bay Packers season was their 50th season overall and the 48th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–7–1 record under first-year head coach Phil Bengston, earning them a third-place finish in the Central Division of the Western Conference. It was also the Packers' first losing season since 1958.

1968 NFL/AFL Draft

The 1968 National Football League draft was part of the common draft, in the second year in which the NFL and AFL held a joint draft of college players. It took place at the Belmont Plaza Hotel in New York City on January 30–31, 1968.This was the last draft until 1980 in which the Washington Redskins exercised their first-round pick. Most of them were traded away by coach George Allen between 1971 and 1977 due to Allen's well-known preference for veteran players over rookies.

1969 Green Bay Packers season

The 1969 Green Bay Packers season was their 51st season overall and their 49th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under coach Phil Bengtson, earning them a 3rd-place finish in the Central division.

1970 Green Bay Packers season

The 1970 Green Bay Packers season was their 52nd season overall and their 50th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record earning them a third consecutive third-place finish in the four-team NFC Central division. It was the third and final season for Phil Bengtson as head coach; he resigned shortly after the season ended.

1971 Green Bay Packers season

The 1971 Green Bay Packers season was their 53rd season overall and their 51st season in the National Football League (NFL). The club posted a 4–8–2 record under first-year coach Dan Devine, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1972 Green Bay Packers season

The 1972 Green Bay Packers season was their 54th season overall and their 52nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–4 record under second-year head coach Dan Devine, earning them the NFC Central division title. The Packers returned to the playoffs after a four-year drought; their most recent division title was in 1967, completing that postseason with a decisive win in Super Bowl II in January 1968.

In 1972, Green Bay entered the penultimate regular season game at Minnesota on December 10 with an 8–4 record. The Vikings (7–5) had won the season's earlier game at Lambeau Field in Green Bay by breaking a fourth quarter tie with two interceptions for touchdowns. This time, the Packers overcame a 7–0 halftime deficit at Metropolitan Stadium with 23 unanswered points to clinch the division title. Running back John Brockington became the first in NFL history to rush for 1,000 yards in each of his first two seasons, and did it again the following season.

Placekicker Chester Marcol established an NFL rookie record for field goals in a season (since broken). It was the fifteenth and final season of hall of fame linebacker Ray Nitschke.

The Packers' next division title came 23 years later, in 1995.

1973 Green Bay Packers season

The 1973 Green Bay Packers season was their 55th season overall and their 53rd season in the National Football League. The defending division champions posted a 5–7–2 record under third-year head coach Dan Devine, earning them a third-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1974 Green Bay Packers season

The 1974 Green Bay Packers season was their 56th season overall and their 54th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record under fourth-year head coach Dan Devine, a consecutive third-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers lost their last three games, all to non-playoff teams.

With a year remaining on his five-year contract, Devine resigned a day after the last game of the regular season and returned to college football at Notre Dame, following the sudden retirement of Ara Parseghian. Devine was succeeded as head coach at Green Bay by hall of fame quarterback Bart Starr, hired on Christmas Eve.

Agua Fria High School

Agua Fria High School is located in Avondale, Arizona. It is a part of the Agua Fria Union High School District and was its only school until 1999 when Millennium High School was built.

It was established in 1928 as Litchfield Park High School. In 1956, the school relocated to Avondale and obtained its current name. In the 1982-83 school year, it was honored as a Blue Ribbon school.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of Arizona Wildcats in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Arizona Wildcats football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Philadelphia Eagles players

This is a complete list of American football players who have played for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Philadelphia Eagles franchise was founded in 1933. The Eagles played in four pre-Super Bowl Era NFL Championships (1947, 1948, 1949 and 1960) winning three (1948, 1949 and 1960). They have also played in three Super Bowls (XV, XXXIX and LII), winning Super Bowl LII.

Lück

Lück or Lueck is a German surname that may refer to:

Bill Lueck (born 1946), American football player

Dale Lueck (born 1949), American politician

Daniel Lück (born 1991), German footballer

Hans-Joachim Lück (born 1953), German rower

Heidi Lück (born 1943), German politician

Ingolf Lück (born 1958), German actor and comedian

Kurt Lück (1900–1942), German historian and SS Obersturmbannführer

Martin C. Lueck (1888–1986), American farmer and politician

Martin L. Lueck (1872–1926), American politician and judge

Petra Kusch-Lück (born 1948), German host, entertainer, dancer and singer.

Siegfried Lück, retired East German slalom canoeist competing from the late 1950s to the late 1960s

Thomas Lück (born 1981), German sprint canoer

Wolfgang Lück (born 1957), German mathematician

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