Bill Kern

William Franklin Kern (September 2, 1906 – April 5, 1985) was an American football player and coach. He played college football as a tackle at the University of Pittsburgh in 1925 and 1927 and then with the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) in 1929 and 1930. Kern served as the head football coach at the Carnegie Institute of Technology from 1937 to 1939 and at West Virginia University from 1940 to 1942 and again in 1946 and 1947, compiling a career record of 36–35–2. In 1938, he led the Carnegie Tech Tartans to the Sugar Bowl, where they lost to the national champion TCU Horned Frogs, 15–7.

Bill Kern
Bill Kern
Kern pictured in The Monticola 1941, West Virginia yearbook
Biographical details
BornSeptember 3, 1906
Kingston, Pennsylvania
DiedApril 5, 1985 (aged 78)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1925, 1927Pittsburgh
1929–1930Green Bay Packers
Position(s)Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1936Pittsburgh (assistant)
1937–1939Carnegie Tech
1940–1942West Virginia
1943Del Monte Pre-Flight
1946–1947West Virginia
Head coaching record
Overall43–36–2
Bowls0–1
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1927
AFCA Coach of the Year (1938)
Bill Kern
Born:September 2, 1906
Kingston, Pennsylvania
Died:April 5, 1985 (aged 78)
Career information
Position(s)Tackle
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight187 lb (85 kg)
CollegePittsburgh
High schoolWyoming Seminary (Kingston, PA)
Career history
As player
1929–1930Green Bay Packers

Playing career

As a player in college, he was a first team All-American tackle at the University of Pittsburgh in 1927.[1] Following college, Kern played tackle for the NFL's Green Bay Packers in 1929 and 1930.[2]

Coaching career

Kern's tenure at West Virginia was interrupted by military service during World War II. He served as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1945.[3]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Carnegie Tech Tartans () (1937–1939)
1937 Carnegie Tech 2–5–1
1938 Carnegie Tech 7–2 L Sugar 6
1939 Carnegie Tech 3–5
Carnegie Tech: 12–12–1
West Virginia Mountaineers (Independent) (1940–1942)
1940 West Virginia 4–4–1
1941 West Virginia 4–6
1942 West Virginia 5–4
Del Monte Pre-Flight Navyators (Independent) (1943)
1943 Del Monte Pre-Flight 7–1 8
Del Monte Pre-Flight: 7–1
West Virginia Mountaineers (Independent) (1946–1947)
1946 West Virginia 5–5
1947 West Virginia 6–4
West Virginia: 24–23–1
Total: 43–36–2

See also

References

  1. ^ Borghetti, E.J.; Nestor, Mendy; Welsh, Celeste, eds. (2008). 2008 Pitt Football Media Guide (PDF). Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh. p. 158.
  2. ^ "Bill Kern Statistics". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 7 December 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  3. ^ "Kern Resigns as West Virginia Coach". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. November 26, 1947. Retrieved December 29, 2010.

External links

1938 Carnegie Tech Tartans football team

The 1938 Carnegie Tech Tartans football team represented the Carnegie Institute of Technology during the 1938 college football season. The Tartans were led by second-year head coach Bill Kern and played their home games at Pitt Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The team first came to national attention after winning a close game against Northeastern power Holy Cross, who were on a 13-game unbeaten streak. Another big win came when the Tartans upset cross-town rival and defending national champion Pittsburgh, snapping their 22-game winning streak.They finished the regular season at 7–1 and were ranked sixth in the final AP Poll, the only Carnegie Tech team to ever finish ranked. The Tartans were awarded the third ever Lambert Trophy, distinguishing them as the best college football team in the East. They were invited to their first and only bowl game in school history, the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans, where they led at halftime but lost to national champion TCU, 7–15.

1940 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1940 West Virginia Mountaineers football team was an American football team that represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1940 college football season. In its first season under head coach Bill Kern, the team compiled a 4–4–1 record and outscored opponents by a total of 127 to 94. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. John Shonk was the team captain.

1941 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1941 West Virginia Mountaineers football team was an American football team that represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1941 college football season. In its second season under head coach Bill Kern, the team compiled a 4–6 record and was outscored by a total of 126 to 85. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. Henry Goodman was the team captain.

1942 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1942 West Virginia Mountaineers football team was an American football team that represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1942 college football season. In its third season under head coach Bill Kern, the team compiled a 5–4 record and outscored opponents by a total of 119 to 91. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. Richard McElwee was the team captain.

1943 Del Monte Pre-Flight Navyators football team

The 1943 Del Monte Pre-Flight Seahawks football team represented the United States Navy's Del Monte Pre-Flight School during the 1943 college football season. The school was located at the Hotel Del Monte in Del Monte, California (annexed in 1948 into Monterey, California), The team compiled a 7–1 record, outscored opponents by a total of 252 to 65, and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP Poll.Bill Kern, who had been the head coach at Carnegie Tech and West Virginia prior to the war, was the team's head coach. The team included a number of athletes who were then serving in the Navy. Notable players include: Paul Christman, an All-American quarterback at Missouri; Parker Hall, an All-American back out of Ole Miss who played in the NFL from 1939 to 1942; Len Eshmont, a back who played in the NFL in 1941; Ed Cifers, an end who played in the NFL from 1941 to 1942; Bowden Wyatt, an end out of Tennessee; and Jim McDonald, a back who played in the NFL from 1938 to 1939.

1946 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1946 West Virginia Mountaineers football team was an American football team that represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1946 college football season. In its fourth non-consecutive season under head coach Bill Kern, the team compiled a 5–5 record and was outscored by a total of 120 to 99. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. Victor Peelish was the team captain.

1947 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1947 West Virginia Mountaineers football team was an American football team that represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1947 college football season. In its fifth season under head coach Bill Kern, the team compiled a 6–4 record and outscored opponents by a total of 252 to 84. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. Eugene Corum was the team captain. The team played its home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia.

1962 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1962 Kansas City Athletics season was the eighth season in Kansas City, and the 62nd in franchise history. It involved the Athletics finishing ninth in the American League with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses, 24 games behind the World Series Champion New York Yankees. The A's were last in the American League in paid attendance.

Bill Kern (baseball)

William George Kern (born February 28, 1933 at Coplay, Pennsylvania) is a retired American Major League Baseball outfielder. After nine seasons in minor league baseball, Kern had an eight-game trial with the Kansas City Athletics during the 1962 season. He had signed with the team when they were still based in Philadelphia, in 1954. Kern attended Muhlenberg College, graduating in 1954.

Kern threw and batted right-handed, stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 184 pounds (83 kg). He batted over .300 four times and hit 144 home runs during his minor-league career. In September 1962, at age 29, he was recalled by the Athletics after he batted .315 with 27 home runs and 97 runs batted in for the Triple-A Portland Beavers. Kern appeared in eight games played, batting 16 times with four hits. In his first MLB game, he pinch hit for Moe Drabowsky and singled off Dick Donovan of the Cleveland Indians. In his final MLB game, as the A's starting leftfielder, he hit his lone Major League home run off future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher (and United States Senator) Jim Bunning, then with the Detroit Tigers.

Charles Augustus Lueder

Charles Augustus Lueder (May 30, 1878 – August 14, 1954) was an American head coach in both rowing and college football. He was a native of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, and was known as a talented athlete while attending Cornell University.

F. William Rane

F. William "John" Rane was an American football coach. He served as the second head football coach at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia and he held that position for two seasons, from 1893 until 1894. His coaching record at West Virginia was 4–3.

Rane was the head coach for West Virginia's first victory on October 7, 1893 but the team still suffered a sound loss to Washington and Jefferson College by a score of 52 to 0, a bitter repeat of the previous year's loss to Washington and Jefferson by a score of 72 to 0.

Frederick Lincoln Emory

Frederick Lincoln Emory (April 10, 1867 – December 31, 1919) was an American football coach and professor of mechanics and applied mathematics. He served as the first head football coach at West Virginia University, coaching one game in 1891. The single game that he coached was played on November 28, 1891 against Washington and Jefferson. The West Virginia Mountaineers lost by a score of 72 to zero, the second-worst loss in the history of the program.He died in 1919 from heart-related problems.

Gene Corum

Gene Corum (May 29, 1921 – January 2, 2010) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at West Virginia University from 1960 to 1965, compiling a record of 29–30–2. Corum played college football as a guard at West Virginia in the 1940s and graduated in 1948. He was inducted into the West Virginia University Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.

George Krebs

George R. Krebs (March 5, 1872 – May 8, 1939) was an American football player and coach. He served as the fifth head football coach

at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia and he held that position for the 1897 season, in which he also captained the team.

His coaching record at West Virginia was 5–4–1. A native of New Martinsville, Krebs graduated from West Virginia University in 1899 in with a degree in engineering.Krebs also played professional football during this period for the Latrobe Athletic Association and was even a member of the 1898 Western Pennsylvania All-Star football team. He died in 1939 of heart problems.

Harry Anderson (coach)

Harry McCLellan Anderson (January 29, 1872 – June 14, 1957) was an American football coach. He served as the sixth head football coach at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia and he held that position for the 1898 season. His coaching record at West Virginia was 6–1.

Anderson also served as the head coach at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky during the 1896 and 1897 seasons.

John Ethan Hill

John Ethan Hill (October 15, 1865 – July 2, 1941) was an American mathematician and college football coach. He served as the eighth head football coach fat West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia and he held that position for the 1900 season. His coaching record at West Virginia was 4–3.Hillwas born in Mystic, Connecticut in 1865. He died on July 2, 1941 at Brooklyn, New York. He was buried at Elm Grove Cemetery in Mystic.

Lewis Yeager

Lewis Armstrong Yeager, first name sometimes spelled Louis (September 10, 1878 – December 10, 1906) was an American football coach. He served as the seventh head football coach at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia and he held that position for three seasons, in 1899 and from 1901 to 1902. His coaching record at West Virginia was 12–9.Yeager died suddenly in 1906 of heart disease. He is interred at Oak Grove Cemetery in Morgantown.

List of West Virginia Mountaineers head football coaches

List of West Virginia University Mountaineers head football coaches

Marshall Glenn

Marshall "Little Sleepy" Glenn (April 22, 1908 – October 11, 1983) was a player and coach of American football and basketball and a physician. He served as the head football coach at West Virginia University from 1937 to 1939, compiling a record of 14–12–3, and the school's head basketball coach from 1933 to 1938, tallying a mark of 61–46. Glenn was born on April 22, 1908 in Elkins, West Virginia. He died on October 11, 1983 at Washington Country Hospital in Hagerstown, Maryland from injuries sustained in a car accident on U.S. Route 340. While attending West Virginia University he was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon.

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