Bill Frenzel

William Eldridge "Bill" Frenzel (July 31, 1928 – November 17, 2014) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota, representing Minnesota's Third District, which included the southern and western suburbs of Minneapolis.

Bill Frenzel
Bill Frenzel
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota's 3rd district
In office
January 3, 1971 – January 3, 1991
Preceded byClark MacGregor
Succeeded byJim Ramstad
Member of the Minnesota House of Representatives
In office
1962–1970
Personal details
Born
William Eldridge Frenzel

July 31, 1928
St. Paul, Minnesota
Died November 17, 2014 (aged 86)
McLean, Virginia
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Ruth Purdy (married June 9, 1951)
ChildrenDeborah, Pamela, Melissa
2 grandchildren
ResidenceMcLean, Virginia
Alma materDartmouth College (B.A. 1950, M.B.A. 1951)
WebsiteBill Frenzel – Brookings Institution
Military service
Branch/serviceUnited States Naval Reserve
Years of service1951–54
RankLieutenant
Battles/warsKorean war
[1][2]

Early life and career

Frenzel was educated at the Saint Paul Academy in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and earned both a B.A. (1950) and M.A. (1951) from Dartmouth College. He served as a lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserve during the Korean War from 1951 to 1954.

Frenzel served eight years in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1962 to 1970, prior to serving in the U.S. Congress.[3] He was president of the No. Waterway Terminals Corp. (1965–70) and of Minneapolis Terminal Warehouse Company (1966–1970). He was a member of the executive committee for Hennepin County, Minnesota (1966–1967).[1]

House of Representatives

Frenzel was elected as a Republican to the 92nd, 93rd, 94th, 95th, 96th, 97th, 98th, 99th, 100th, and 101st congresses, serving from January 3, 1971 to January 3, 1991, and was the ranking Republican on the House Budget Committee and a member of the influential Ways and Means Committee. He was a Congressional Representative to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in Geneva for 15 years. Frenzel became known as an expert in budget and fiscal policy, election law, trade, taxes and congressional procedures, and was a negotiator in the 1990 budget summit. During the Iran–Iraq War of the 1980s, Frenzel was a proponent of economic ties to the regime of Saddam Hussein, and opposed congressional efforts to condemn Iraqi war crimes such as the infamous Halabja chemical attack, the deadliest chemical-weapons attack in history, on the grounds that they would disrupt future trade with Iraq.[4] He also served as vice chairman of the Committee on House Administration, and vice chairman of the Commission on Congressional Mailing Standards. He did not run for re-election to the House in 1990.

Post-Congressional career

Frenzel was chairman of the Ripon Society, a Republican think-tank, from the 1990s until March 2004.[5] He has been a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, since January 1991, and was named director of the Brookings Governmental Affairs Institute on July 18, 1997.

President Bill Clinton appointed Frenzel (1993) to help sell the North American Free Trade Agreement.[6][7]

In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed him to a commission to study the Social Security system, and, in 2002, to the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiations (ACTPN), which he chairs. He was interviewed on NPR's All Things Considered, on December 20, 2004, as an advocate of President Bush's plan for Social Security privatization.

At the time of his death, he was chairman of the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care, the Vice Chairman of the Eurasia Foundation, Chairman of the Japan-America Society of Washington, Chairman of the U.S. Steering Committee of the Transatlantic Policy Network, Co-Chairman of the Center for Strategic Tax Reform, Co-Chairman of the Bretton Woods Committee, Co-Chairman of the Committee For A Responsible Federal Budget, a member of the Executive Committee of the Committee on U.S.-China Relations, and Chairman of the Executive Committee of the International Tax and Investment Center.

He was an alternate board member of the Office of Congressional Ethics (as of 2011.)

Policy opinions

On political gridlock

Frenzel wrote in 1995:

There are some of us who think gridlock is the best thing since indoor plumbing. Gridlock is the natural gift the Framers of the Constitution gave us so that the country would not be subjected to policy swings resulting from the whimsy of the public. And the competition – whether multi-branch, multi-level, or multi-house – is important to those checks and balances and to our ongoing kind of centrist government. Thank heaven we do not have a government that nationalizes one year and privatizes next year, and so on ad infinitum.

(Checks and Balances, 8)

The historian of the Republican party, Geoffrey Kabaservice has identified Frenzel as a key moderate Republican within the post-war GOP.[8]

Family and Personal life

Frenzel and his wife Ruth had three daughters. In 2000, he was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star, by the Emperor of Japan. In 2002, he received an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from Hamline University.

In 1984, the National Coalition for Science and Technology named him a "friend of science."[9]

Death

Frenzel died of cancer on November 17, 2014 in McLean, Virginia.[10][11]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Clark MacGregor
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota's 3rd congressional district

1971–1991
Succeeded by
Jim Ramstad

References

  1. ^ a b "Bill Frenzel". The Complete Marquis Who's Who (Fee – via Fairfax County Public Library). Marquis Who's Who. 2010. Gale Document Number: GALE|K2013033467. Retrieved 2011-08-21. Gale Biography In Context.
  2. ^ Frenzel, W.E. (August 2009). "Curriculum Vitae". Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution. Missing or empty |url= (help); |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  3. ^ "Frenzel, William Eldridge "Bill" - Legislator Record - Minnesota Legislators Past & Present". Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  4. ^ Holt, Brian (July 1998). "Military Intervention in the Kurdish Crisis (March-July 1991) [Ph.D. thesis]" (PDF). King's College, University of London. p. 135. Retrieved 14 July 2014.
  5. ^ McCaslin, John (September 5, 2008). "Inside the Beltway". Washington Times.
  6. ^ Bradsher, Keith (September 3, 1993). "Clinton to Name Republican To Aid in Selling Trade Pact". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-08-21.
  7. ^ Ifill, Gwen (September 9, 1993). "Clinton to Delay Effort for Trade Pact". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-08-21. ...Bill Frenzel, the former Republican Congressman ... is now helping lead the Nafta lobbying effort for the Administration.
  8. ^ "Geoffrey Kabaservice Interview on "Rule and Ruin"". Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  9. ^ Walsh, John (1984). Document Number: GALE|A3513749 "Coalition recognizes ten Friends of Science" Check |url= value (help) (Fee – via Fairfax County Public Library). Science. Gale Biography In Context. 226: 675. doi:10.1126/science.226.4675.675. PMID 17774937. Retrieved 2011-08-21.
  10. ^ Neely, Brett. "Former Minnesota U.S. Rep. Bill Frenzel dies". Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  11. ^ "Bill Frenzel, Key Voice on Economics in House, Dies at 86". The New York Times. 18 November 2014. Retrieved 6 October 2016.

External links

1972 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota

All of the 8 Minnesota incumbents were re-elected.

92nd United States Congress

The Ninety-second United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1971, to January 3, 1973, during the third and fourth years of Richard Nixon's presidency.

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the 1960 Census. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

98th United States Congress

The Ninety-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1983, to January 3, 1985, during the third and fourth years of Ronald Reagan's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the 1980 U.S. Census. The Republicans controlled the Senate, while the Democrats controlled the House of Representatives.

Bretton Woods Committee

The Bretton Woods Committee is an American organization created in 1983 as a result of the agreement between U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Fowler, and U.S. Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, Charls Walker – at the time a Democrat and a Republican, respectively. The agreement they arrived upon was that world leaders should express to the public the significance of international finance institutions (IFIs), like the Bretton Woods Institutions, and how important it was for their prominence in the world to be maintained. After the 1944 Bretton Woods Conference, the International Monetary Fund and World Bank were established; they are now often referred to as "Bretton Woods Institutions".The original goal of the Committee was to improve the awareness of the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization, and other major development banks and their actions to accelerate economic growth, lessen poverty, and increase financial stability.The Committee is described as being nonpartisan and composed of notable individuals, more specifically members of the Committee who claim to work and agree upon the significance of international economic synergy which in their view results in well-functioning, adept Bretton Woods Institutions that move to create universal economic progress.

Clark MacGregor

Clark MacGregor (July 12, 1922 – February 10, 2003) was a Republican U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 3rd Congressional District.

MacGregor was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and graduated cum laude from Dartmouth College in 1944 and the University of Minnesota Law School in 1946. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1960, defeating six-term Democratic incumbent Roy Wier, and served in the 87th, 88th, 89th, 90th, and 91st congresses, January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1971.

In 1963, MacGregor appeared in a satirical revue by Dudley Riggs' Brave New Workshop.

He was a delegate to the 1964 and 1968 Republican National Convention from Minnesota. He was an unsuccessful candidate for U.S. Senator from Minnesota in 1970, running against former Democratic Vice President Hubert Humphrey. MacGregor was Assistant to Richard Nixon for congressional relations in 1970, Counsel to the President on congressional relations (1971–1972), Chairman of the Committee to Re-elect the President (July to November 1972) following John Mitchell's resignation from the position in the Watergate political scandal.

After 1973, he left politics. He continued to live in Washington, D.C., worked for United Technologies Corporation, and was on the boards of the National Symphony Orchestra and the Wolf Trap Foundation.

Frenzel

Frenzel is a German family name that originated in the Rhineland, and today is prevalent among Volga Germans and in east-central Germany, focused on Dresden. It is a patronymic name meaning son of Franciscus.

There are several historical figures named Frenzel:

Alfred Frenzel - Cold War-era Czechoslovakian spy

Anton Frenzel (1790-1873), bishop of Ermland

Bartholomäus Frenzel (mention 1576), German poet

Bill Frenzel - Minnesota Congressman

Elisabeth Frenzel (1915-2014), German literary notable

Eric Frenzel (1988-), German skier

Ernst Frenzel (born 1904), German banker, SA brigade leader and Reichstag delegate

Fritz Frenzel (1855-1915), German writer and publisher (alias August Bäbchen)

Gotfried Frenzel (born 1929), German art historian and restorer

Hans Frenzel (1921-1989), German broadcast director

Herbert Frenzel (novelist), German novelist

Herbert A. Frenzel (1908-1995), German theatre notable

Hermann Robert Frenzel (1850-?), German organist and technical writer

Hermann Walter Gotthold Frenzel (1895-?), German HNO physician and Luftwaffe officer, inventor of the Frenzel maneuver to balance pressure

Ivo Frenzel (1924-2014), German author, Daten deutscher Dichtung

Johann Gottlieb Frenzel (1715-1780), German lawyer, historian and philosopher

Johann Gottlieb Abraham Frenzel (1782-1855), German coppersmith

Karl Frenzel (1827-1914), German writer and critic

Karl Frenzel (1911—1996) - German Nazi SS-Oberscharführer, one of Sobibor's SS commanders

Michael Frenzel

Oskar Frenzel (1855-1915), German animal and landscape painter

Paul Frenzel (1824-1872), German animal and landscape painter

Walther Frenzel (1884-1970), German engineer and professor of textile chemistryFurther, there are several businesses named Frenzel, among them a Düsseldorf manufacturer.

Geoff Michel

Geoff Michel (born November 13, 1963) is a Minnesota politician and former member of the Minnesota Senate who represented District 41, which included portions of the southwestern Twin Cities suburbs of Edina and Bloomington in Hennepin County. A Republican, he was first elected to the Senate in 2002, succeeding retiring Senator Roy Terwilliger, who represented the area as District 42 before the 2002 legislative redistricting. Michel was reelected in 2006 and 2010.Michel was named deputy majority leader in January 2011. In December 2011 he briefly served as interim majority leader after the resignation of former leader Amy Koch, leaving the position when the Republican caucus replaced its leadership team. Michel is chair of the Senate Jobs and Economic Growth Committee and of the Senate Rules and Administration Subcommittee for Redistricting. He also served on the Senate's Rules and Administration and Taxes committees, and on the Rules and Administration subcommittees for Committees and for Conference Committees. Michel was an assistant minority leader from 2005 to 2011. His special legislative concerns included education, transportation, and taxes.In March 2012, Michel announced he would not seek reelection to the Minnesota Senate. On March 19, 2012, an ethics complaint was filed against Michel by Senator Sandy Pappas. Pappas claimed that Michel had “betrayed the public’s trust” by providing an inaccurate statement to the media and that he had brought “dishonor and disrepute” to the Minnesota Senate. The Minnesota Senate Rules and Administration Subcommittee on Ethical Conduct conducted two hearings into the complaint, but deadlocked on a resolution. The ethics complaint against Michel remains unresolved.

The short time that Michel served as Interim Senate Majority Leader has come under additional scrutiny due to a pending lawsuit from a former employee of the Minnesota Senate, Michael Brodkorb. Michel was listed in initial paperwork regarding Brodkorb's planned lawsuit over his termination from the Minnesota Senate. On May 25, 2012, the Minnesota Senate released legal bills showing they had spent $46,150 in the first 3 months of 2012 to prepare a defense to Brodkorb's suit.On June 19, 2012, the Minnesota Senate announced additional legal bills in the amount of $38,533, bringing the total legal costs incurred by the Minnesota Senate due to the termination of Brodkorb to almost $85,000 since the end of the May 2012.Michel is an attorney, and works as a corporate counsel for Securian Financial Group. He also served as legal counsel for Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson's office from 1990 to 1994, and was a legislative assistant to former U.S. Congressman Bill Frenzel. He graduated from Minnetonka High School in Minnetonka, then attended Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, earning a B.A. degree. He went on to the University of Minnesota Law School, earning a J.D. degree.Michel has served on various government and community boards and organizations. He is a former board member of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, and a former chair of the chamber's education committee. He is also a former member of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Citizen Board. He is a board member of the Minnesota Children's Museum, and of the Edina Soccer Club.

Jim Ramstad

James Marvin Ramstad (born May 6, 1946) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Minnesota.

July 31

July 31 is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 153 days remaining until the end of the year.

List of Brookings Institution scholars

This list of Brookings Institution scholars contains current or former notable scholars from the Brookings Institution. This list is not exhaustive.

List of United States Representatives from Minnesota

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Minnesota. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Minnesota. The list of names should be complete as of January 3, 2019, but other data may be incomplete.

Mark Kennedy (politician)

Mark Raymond Kennedy (born April 11, 1957), is an American businessman, politician, and administrator, who is currently serving as the 12th president of the University of North Dakota, having previously led the George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management. A Republican, he served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota from 2001 to 2007. Kennedy did not seek re-election in 2006, instead running in the 2006 election for U.S. Senate. He lost the general election to Democratic–Farmer–Labor nominee Amy Klobuchar.

Mark W. Olson

Mark Walter Olson (March 17, 1943 – September 12, 2018) was an American economist and politician who was a member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 2001 to 2006. Filling an unexpired term to end on January 31, 2010, he resigned on June 21, 2006 in order to run the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

November 17

November 17 is the 321st day of the year (322nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 44 days remaining until the end of the year.

Peter B. Davidson

Peter B. Davidson is an American lawyer and government official who currently serves as the General Counsel of the United States Department of Commerce. From 2003 to 2017, he was the senior vice president for federal government relations at Verizon Communications. Before that he held positions as general counsel to the United States Trade Representative, vice president for congressional relations at US West and Qwest, general counsel and policy director to the Majority Leader of the House of Representatives, attorney-advisor in the Office of Legal Counsel of the United States Department of Justice, director of congressional and media relations at the United States Information Agency, staffer to Representatives Dick Armey and Bill Frenzel, and law clerk on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.

Presidential system

A presidential system is a democratic and republican system of government where a head of government leads an executive branch that is separate from the legislative branch. This head of government is in most cases also the head of state, which is called president.

In presidential countries, the executive is elected and is not responsible to the legislature, which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. Such dismissal is possible, however, in uncommon cases, often through impeachment.

The title "president" has persisted from a time when such person personally presided over the governing body, as with the President of the Continental Congress in the early United States, prior to the executive function being split into a separate branch of government.

A presidential system contrasts with a parliamentary system, where the head of government is elected to power through the legislative. There is also a hybrid system called semi-presidentialism.

Countries that feature a presidential or semi-presidential system of government are not the exclusive users of the title of president. Heads of state of parliamentary republics, largely ceremonial in most cases, are called presidents. Dictators or leaders of one-party states, popularly elected or not, are also often called presidents.

Presidentialism is the dominant form of government in the continental Americas, with 19 of its 23 sovereign states being presidential republics. It is also prevalent in Central and southern West Africa and in Central Asia.

Prevention of Genocide Act of 1988

The Prevention of Genocide Act of 1988 was a United States Senate bill to punish Iraq for chemical weapons attacks on the Kurds at Halabja during the Iran–Iraq War. It was defeated after intense lobbying of Congress by the Reagan-Bush White House which then supported Iraq's Saddam Hussein as a counterbalance to post-revolutionary Iran.

St. Paul Academy and Summit School

St. Paul Academy and Summit School is a college preparatory independent day school in Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, for students in grades K–12.

The school was established through a merger in 1969 of St. Paul Academy, a school for boys, and Summit School, a school for girls. St. Paul Academy was founded in 1900 and Summit School in 1917. Accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Central States, SPA is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the Cum Laude Society, and The College Board.

Recent commencement speakers have included Al Franken, Wilhelmina Wright, Coretta Scott King,

and Garrison Keillor.

United States congressional delegations from Minnesota

These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Minnesota's delegation(s) to the 92nd–101st United States Congresses (ordered by seniority)
92nd Senate: W. Mondale | H. Humphrey House: J. Blatnik | A. Quie | J. Karth | A. Nelson | D.M. Fraser | J.M. Zwach | R. Bergland | B. Frenzel
93rd Senate: W. Mondale | H. Humphrey House: J. Blatnik | A. Quie | J. Karth | A. Nelson | D.M. Fraser | J.M. Zwach | R. Bergland | B. Frenzel
94th Senate: W. Mondale | H. Humphrey House: A. Quie | J. Karth | D.M. Fraser | R. Bergland | B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar
94th Senate: H. Humphrey | W. Anderson House: A. Quie | J. Karth | D.M. Fraser | R. Bergland | B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar
95th Senate: H. Humphrey | W. Anderson House: A. Quie | D.M. Fraser | R. Bergland | B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar | B. Vento
95th Senate: W. Anderson | M.H. Brown House: A. Quie | D.M. Fraser | B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland
95th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: A. Quie | D.M. Fraser | B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland
96th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | R. Nolan | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | A. Erdahl | M.O. Sabo
97th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | T. Hagedorn | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | A. Erdahl | M.O. Sabo | V. Weber
98th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | M.O. Sabo | V. Weber | T. Penny | G. Sikorski
99th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | M.O. Sabo | V. Weber | T. Penny | G. Sikorski
100th Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | M.O. Sabo | V. Weber | T. Penny | G. Sikorski
101st Senate: D. Durenberger | R. Boschwitz House: B. Frenzel | J. Oberstar | B. Vento | A. Stangeland | M.O. Sabo | V. Weber | T. Penny | G. Sikorski

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