Bill Forester

George William Forester (August 9, 1932 – April 27, 2007) was a professional American football linebacker in the National Football League.[1][2] He played eleven seasons for the Green Bay Packers (19531963) and was selected to four Pro Bowls. He was selected to the Packers Hall of Fame in 1974.

Bill Forester
No. 69, 71
Born:August 9, 1932
Dallas, Texas
Died:April 27, 2007 (aged 74)
Dallas, Texas
Career information
Position(s)Linebacker
Height6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight237 lb (108 kg)
CollegeSouthern Methodist
High schoolDallas (TX) Woodrow Wilson
NFL draft1953 / Round: 3 / Pick 31
Career history
As player
1953–1963Green Bay Packers
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls1959, 1960, 1961, 1962
Honors
Career stats

Early years

Born and raised in Dallas, Texas, Forester graduated from its Woodrow Wilson High School in 1949 at age 16. He was an all-city, all-state, and all-Southern fullback / linebacker for the Wildcats and played in the 1949 Texas High School Coaches Association All-Star Game.

Forester played college football in Dallas at SMU and was named All-Southwest Conference (SWC) linebacker in 1951 and 1952. He also played on the defensive line and at fullback. Following his senior season in 1952, he was selected to play in the East–West Shrine Game in December and the College All-Star Game in Chicago in August 1953.

Playing career

Forester was selected in the third round (31st overall) of the 1953 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers. He played on the Packer defense for eleven seasons, from 1953 through 1963, as a defensive tackle for three of his first four seasons, with one season at left outside linebacker. He then moved to middle linebacker for a few games in 1957, and later to the right side where he would play the rest of his career at.[1] Forester played under four head coaches in Green Bay; the last was Vince Lombardi, who arrived in his seventh season in 1959. He was a member of Lombardi's first two NFL championship teams in 1961 and 1962, both wins over the New York Giants.[3]

Forester made All-Pro five times (19591963) and played in four Pro Bowls (19591962). He was a defensive captain for seven seasons and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in early 1974.[4] Forester was inducted into his high school's hall of fame in 1999 and into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2015, the Professional Football Researchers Association named Forester to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2015 [5]

After football

Forester moved back to Dallas and ran a successful sporting goods business for decades before his retirement.[1]

Death

After a long illness, Forester died at age 74 in 2007.[2] He is buried at Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in North Dallas.

References

  1. ^ a b c Hendricks, Martin (November 29, 2012). "Forester provided Packers with talented versatility". Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Former Packers linebacker Bill Forester dies at 74". USA Today. Associated Press. April 30, 2007. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  3. ^ Maule, Tex (December 18, 1961). "Green Bay: a corner on defense". Sports Illustrated. p. 28.
  4. ^ "10 Packers added to team hall of fame". Milwaukee Journal. January 7, 1974. p. 12, part 2.
  5. ^ "Professional Researchers Association Hall of Very Good Class of 2015". Retrieved November 10, 2016.

External links

1953 Green Bay Packers season

The 1953 Green Bay Packers season was their 35th season overall and their 33rd in the National Football League. The club posted a 2–9–1 record under head coach Gene Ronzani and interim co-coaches Ray McLean, and Hugh Devore, and finished last in the newly named Western Conference.

Fourth-year head coach Ronzani led the team for the first ten games, but resigned after a nationally televised Thanksgiving Day loss, his eighth loss to the Detroit Lions in four seasons; McLean and Devore co-coached the last two games of the season, both losses.

It was the only in-season coaching change in Packers history, until 2018. This season also marked the first season that the Packers played at the recently completed Milwaukee County Stadium.

1958 Green Bay Packers season

The 1958 Green Bay Packers season was their 40th season overall and their 38th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 1–10–1 record under first-year head coach Ray McLean for a last-place finish in the league in 1958 and the worst record ever posted by a Packers team.

In the immortal words of New York sportswriter and Green Bay native Red Smith: "they overwhelmed one opponent, under-whelmed ten, and whelmed one." The tie came in week two and the three-point win in week five; during the seven-game losing streak to end the season the Packers lost by an average margin of over 22 points and got no closer than ten. The Packers finished 1958 allowing a league-worst 382 points in the 12-game season (31.8 points per game).

McLean was the top assistant on the coaching staff in 1957 and was given a one-year contract as head coach after Lisle Blackbourn was fired in early January 1958 with a year remaining ($25,000) on a five-year contract. Following the final game of the 1958 season, McLean resigned on December 17, which paved the way for the historic hiring of Vince Lombardi in January 1959.The underachieving 1958 team was loaded with talent, with future hall of famers Bart Starr, Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Jim Ringo, Forrest Gregg, and Jerry Kramer, as well as future All-Pros Ron Kramer, Max McGee, Bill Forester, and Dan Currie.

1960 All-Pro Team

Selectors of All-Pros for the 1960 National Football League season included the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and The Sporting News (SN).

1962 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1962. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1962 Green Bay Packers season

The 1962 Green Bay Packers season was their 44th season overall and their 42nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 13–1 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 16–7 in the NFL Championship Game, the Packers second consecutive defeat of the Giants in the championship game. This marked the Packers' eighth NFL World Championship.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1962 Packers as the fifth-greatest defense in NFL history, noting, "The great 1962 Packers had a rock-solid defense front to back, with five Hall of Famers: defensive linemen Willie Davis and Henry Jordan, linebacker Ray Nitschke, cornerback Herb Adderley, and safety Willie Wood. (They also had 1962 All-Pro linebackers Dan Currie and Bill Forester.) Green Bay gave up just 10.8 points per game, shutting out opponents three times. The Packers held opposing QBs to a 43.5 rating, due, in part, to Wood's league-leading nine interceptions. The Packers' defense allowed the Giants 291 yards in the NFL championship game, but held the Giants offense scoreless as the Packers won, 16–7 (New York scored on a blocked punt)."

The Packers' +267 point differential (points scored vs. points against) in 1962 is the best total of any NFL team in the 1960s. Cold Hard Football Facts says that the 1962 Packers "may have been the best rushing team in the history of football. And that team etched in historic stone the image of Lombardi's three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust Packers that is still so powerful today."

1963 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press National Football League's All-Pro Team in 1963.

Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

Bob Forte

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Bob Monnett

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Charley Brock

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Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

Jesse Whittenton

Urshell James "Jesse" Whittenton (May 9, 1934 – May 21, 2012) was an American football player who played nine seasons in the NFL, mainly for the Green Bay Packers.

Whittenton also played on the Senior PGA Tour in the late 1980s. His best finish was T-21 at the 1989 Showdown Classic.

List of Green Bay Packers Pro Bowl selections

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are currently members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL), and are the third-oldest franchise in the NFL. The team has had representatives to the Pro Bowl every year since 1950 except for nine seasons. Below is a list of the Pro Bowl selections for each season.

Mike Douglass (American football)

Michael Reese Douglass (born March 15, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former American football player. He played outside linebacker for the Green Bay Packers (1978–1985) and the San Diego Chargers (1986) in the National Football League. He ranks third in the lists of tackles made by a Packers player.

Nate Barragar

Nathan Robert Barragar (June 3, 1907 – August 10, 1985) was an American collegiate and professional football player.

Pete Tinsley

Elijah Pope "Pete" Tinsley (March 16, 1913 – May 11, 1995) was a professional football player, born in Sumter, South Carolina, who played guard, defense and offense for eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979.

Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery

Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery is located at 7405 West Northwest Highway in North Dallas, Texas (USA). It is owned by Service Corporation International. Among the notable persons interred here are:

Mary Kay Ash (1918–2001), businesswoman

Harry W. Bass, Jr. (1927-1998), businessman

Orville Bullington (1882-1956), lawyer and Republican politician

Maureen Connolly (1934–1969), champion tennis player

Grace Noll Crowell (1877–1969), poet

Jim Cummins (1945–2007), NBC News reporter

Bill Forester (1932–2007), NFL linebacker (1953–1963)

Greer Garson (1904–1996), British-American actress

Ted Hinton (1904-1977), deputy sheriff involved in the capture of the bandits Bonnie and Clyde

William Hootkins (1948-2005), actor

Tom Hughes (1931–1994), managing producer of Dallas Summer Musicals

H. L. Hunt (1889–1974), businessman, one of the wealthiest men in the world

Neel Kearby (1911–1944), World War II Medal of Honor recipient

Freddie King (1934–1976), blues musician

Tom Landry (1924–2000), Hall of Fame head coach of Dallas Cowboys; cenotaph at Texas State Cemetery in Austin

Cyrus Longworth Lundell (1907–1994), scientist

Merlyn Mantle (1932–2009), author and widow of Mickey Mantle

Mickey Mantle (1931–1995), Hall of Fame baseball player

Clint Murchison, Jr. (1923–1987), businessman, founder of Dallas Cowboys

Wilbert Lee O'Daniel (1890–1969), governor of Texas and U.S. senator

B.M. "Mack" Rankin Jr. (1930–2013), businessman, co-founder of Freeport-McMoRan

August Schellenberg (1936-2013), Métis actor

Annette Strauss (1924–1998), mayor of Dallas, Texas

John Tower (1925–1991), United States Senator from 1961 to 1985; cenotaph at Texas State Cemetery in Austin; the first Mrs. Tower, the former Lou Bullington (1920-2001), is also interred at Sparkman-Hillcrest.

George Washington Truett (1867-1944), pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas from 1897 to 1944

Joseph Franklin Wilson (1901–1968), politician

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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