Bill Duggleby

William James Duggleby (March 16, 1874 – August 30, 1944), nicknamed "Frosty Bill", was a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies. He played from 1898 to 1907. He also played two games for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1902 and nine games for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1907. Duggleby is the first of four major league players to hit a grand slam in his first major league at-bat; Jeremy Hermida, Kevin Kouzmanoff and Daniel Nava are the other three. As of 2011, he still holds the Phillies team record for hit batsmen for a career (82).

Duggleby was one of the "jumpers" who left the Phillies in 1902 for other teams, including (in Duggleby's case) Connie Mack's new American League team, the Athletics. The Phillies filed suit to prevent the "jumpers" — in particular, Nap Lajoie, Bill Bernhard, and Chick Fraser — from playing for any other team, a plea which was rejected by a lower court before being upheld by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Duggleby was the first of the "jumpers" to return to the Phillies, on May 8, 1902, after playing only two games with the A's.

He was the manager of the Minor League Baseball team, the Albany Babies, in 1912.

Duggleby, a native of Utica, New York, died in Redfield, New York in 1944.

Bill Duggleby
Bill Duggleby
Pitcher
Born: March 16, 1874
Utica, New York
Died: August 30, 1944 (aged 70)
Redfield, New York
Batted: Unknown Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 21, 1898, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 7, 1907, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Win-Loss Record93-102
Strikeouts453
Earned run average3.18
Teams

See also

External links

1874 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1874 throughout the world.

1898 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1898 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1898 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1898 throughout the world.

1901 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1901 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1902 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1902 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 53 losses.

1902 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1902 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 56–81, 46 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1903 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1903 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 49–86, 39½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1904 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1904 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1905 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1905 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1906 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1906 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 71 wins and 82 losses.

1907 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1907 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1907 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1907 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 26th season for the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise. It involved the Pirates finishing second in the National League.

The offense was led by Tommy Leach and Hall of Famers Honus Wagner and Fred Clarke. Wagner led the NL in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and stolen bases. The Pirates scored the most runs of any team.

Albany Babies

The Albany Babies were a Class C league minor league baseball team located in Albany, Georgia. The team played in the South Atlantic League from 1911 to 1916.

Duggleby (surname)

Duggleby is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Adam Duggleby (born 1984), British cyclist

Bill Duggleby (1874–1944), American baseball player

Vincent Duggleby (born 1939), British financial journalist

Jeremy Hermida

Jeremy Ryan Hermida (born January 30, 1984) is a former professional baseball outfielder. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Florida Marlins, Boston Red Sox, Oakland Athletics, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres, and in Nippon Professional Baseball for the Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters. He bats left-handed and throws right-handed.

Kevin Kouzmanoff

Kevin Kouzmanoff (born July 25, 1981) is an American former professional baseball third baseman and current hitting coach in the Oakland Athletics organization. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians, San Diego Padres, Oakland Athletics, Colorado Rockies and Texas Rangers.

Kouzmanoff is the third of only four players in history to hit a grand slam in his first major league at-bat, after Bill Duggleby in 1898 and Jeremy Hermida in 2005, and followed by Daniel Nava in 2010. Both Kouzmanoff and Nava accomplished this feat on the first pitch they saw.

Kouzmanoff is of Macedonian descent.

List of Major League Baseball players (D)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 864 players with a last name that begins with D who have been on a major league roster at some point.

List of Philadelphia Phillies team records

The Philadelphia Phillies have participated in 127 seasons in Major League Baseball since their inception in 1883. Through 2009, they have played 19,035 games, winning 9,035 and losing 10,162, for a winning their tenure as members of Major League Baseball's National League.

Chuck Klein, the franchise's only batting Triple Crown winner, holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2009 season, with eight, including career slugging percentage, career on-base plus slugging (OPS), and single-season extra-base hits. He is followed by Billy Hamilton, who holds seven records, including career batting average and the single-season runs record.

Several Phillies hold National League and major league records. Pitcher/outfielder John Coleman is the most decorated in this category, holding three major league records, all from the franchise's inaugural season. Coleman set records for losses, earned runs allowed, and hits allowed, all in 1883 when he also set three additional franchise pitching records. Shortstop Jimmy Rollins broke Willie Wilson's record for at-bats in a single season with 716 in 2007, and first baseman Ryan Howard also set the major league record for strikeouts in a single season that same year with 199, before it was broken by Mark Reynolds of the Arizona Diamondbacks the following year. The 1930 Phillies, who went 52–102, set two more National League records, allowing 1,993 hits and 1,193 runs in the regular season.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (D)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 99 have had surnames beginning with the letter D. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: outfielder Ed Delahanty, who played two stints for Philadelphia—from 1888 to 1889, and again from 1891 to 1901; and outfielder Hugh Duffy, who was a Phillie for three seasons (1904–1906) after being out of the major leagues for two years. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Delahanty's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as is catcher Darren Daulton. Delahanty holds two franchise records, amassing 442 doubles and 157 triples to lead all Phillies in those categories. Pitcher Bill Duggleby also holds a record; he hit 81 batters in his eight-year career in Philadelphia.Among the 60 batters in this list, outfielder Vern Duncan's .417 batting average is the highest mark; he amassed five hits in twelve plate appearances with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Dick Davis (.311 in two seasons), Kiddo Davis (.302 in two seasons), Spud Davis (.321 in eight seasons), Delahanty (.348 in eleven seasons), Alexander Donoghue (.318 in one season), and George Durning (.357 in one season). Daulton's 134 home runs and Delahanty's 1,288 runs batted in lead all players whose surnames begin with D.Of this list's 40 pitchers, Valerio de los Santos and Robert Dodd share the best win–loss record by winning percentage; each won one game while losing none. Duggleby's 90 wins and 99 losses are most among the members of this list, as are his 445 strikeouts. Dave Downs' 2.74 earned run average (ERA) in the only season of his career is the best mark in that category. Red Donahue is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, accomplishing the feat on July 8, 1898.One player, Ed Daily, has made 30% or more of his Phillies appearances as a pitcher and a position player. He amassed a 42–36 pitching record with a 2.77 ERA while batting .230 with six home runs as an outfielder.

Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Important figures
Retired numbers
Key personnel
World Series
championships
(2)
NL pennants (7)
Divisionchampionships (11)
Minor league
affiliates
Broadcasting

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.