Bill Doak

William Leopold Doak (January 28, 1891 – November 26, 1954) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher who spent 11 years with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Doak was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1914 he went 19–6 and led the league with an ERA of 1.72. Doak won 20 games in 1920, and led the NL in ERA again in 1921. On June 14, 1924, Doak was traded by the Cardinals to the Brooklyn Robins for Leo Dickerman.[1]

He returned to St. Louis for a short time in 1929 before retiring. His lifetime record is 169–157, with an ERA of 2.98 and 1,014 strikeouts. Even though Doak played with many unremarkable teams, he is among the Cardinals' top 10 in eight pitching categories; his 32 shutouts rank second behind Bob Gibson.

Doak's main pitch, the spitball, earned him the nickname "Spittin' Bill". When the pitch was outlawed in 1920, Doak was one of 17 pitchers allowed to continue throwing the spitball.

Doak made his most lasting contribution to baseball by innovating the design of the baseball glove. In 1920, he suggested to Rawlings that a web should be laced between the first finger and thumb, saying it would create a natural pocket.[2] The Bill Doak glove soon replaced all other baseball gloves and is the standard to this day.

Doak retired to Bradenton, Florida, where he owned a candy shop (Bill Doak's Sweet Shop), and also coached the Bradenton High School baseball team, which made it to the state championship. He died in Bradenton, aged 63.

Bill Doak
Bill doak pitcher
Pitcher
Born: January 28, 1891
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died: November 26, 1954 (aged 63)
Bradenton, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 1, 1912, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
May 13, 1929, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Win–loss record169–157
Earned run average2.98
Strikeouts1,014
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/leagues/MLB/1924-transactions.shtml
  2. ^ Burke, Larry (1995). The Baseball Chronicles - A Decade-by-Decade History of the All-American Pastime. New York, NY: Smithmark Publishing. p. 33. ISBN 0831706805.

External links

1913 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1913 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 32nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 22nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 51–99 during the season and finished 8th in the National League.

1914 Major League Baseball season

The 1914 Major League Baseball season.

1914 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1914 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 33rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 23rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 81–72 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1915 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1915 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 34th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 24th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–81 during the season and finished 6th in the National League. The legendary Rogers Hornsby made his National League debut on September 10.

1916 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1916 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 35th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 25th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 60–93 during the season and finished tied for seventh and last in the National League.

Rogers Hornsby became a regular in the Cardinals lineup starting in 1916. Hornsby played at least one game at each infield position. He immediately established himself as one of the league's leading hitters, finishing the 1916 season fourth in the batting race with a .313 average, and smacking 15 triples, one short of the league's lead.

1917 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1917 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 36th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 26th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 82–70 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1918 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1918 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 37th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 27th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 51–78 during the season and finished 8th in the National League. It would be the last time the Cardinals would finish in last place until 1990, when they finished sixth in the National League East.

1919 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1919 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 38th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 28th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 54–83 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1920 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1920 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 39th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 29th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 75–79 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1921 Major League Baseball season

The 1921 Major League Baseball season, ended when the New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in Game 8 of the World Series. 1921 was the first of three straight seasons in which the Yankees would lead the majors in wins. Babe Ruth broke the single season home run record for the third consecutive season by hitting 59 home runs in 152 games. Ruth also broke Roger Connor's record for the most home runs all time when he hit his 139th home run on July 18 against Bert Cole. The record for career strikeouts, previously held by Cy Young was also broken in 1921 by Walter Johnson; Johnson lead the league in strikeouts with 143 and ended the season with 2,835 strikeouts. Young struck out 2,803 during his career. The Cincinnati Reds set a Major League record for the fewest strikeouts in a season, with only 308. Future hall of famers Kiki Cuyler and Goose Goslin both debuted in September 1921.

1921 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1921 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 40th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 30th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–66 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1922 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1922 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 41st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 31st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 85–69 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1923 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1923 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 42nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 32nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 79–74 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1924 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1924 Brooklyn Robins put up a good fight with the rival New York Giants before falling just short of the pennant. Staff ace Dazzy Vance led the league in wins, ERA, strikeouts and complete games to be named the National League Most Valuable Player.

1927 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1927 Brooklyn Robins had another bad year. They tied a National League record on May 21 by using five pitchers in the eighth inning.

1928 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1928 Brooklyn Robins finished in 6th place, despite pitcher Dazzy Vance leading the league in strikeouts for a seventh straight season as well as posting a career best 2.09 ERA.

1929 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1929 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 48th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 38th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 78–74 during the season and finished 4th in the National League.

List of St. Louis Cardinals team records

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). in 1892. Before joining the NL, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships, tying one other, and 23 league pennants. 11 of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; the other championship and tie occurred in 1885–1886. 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

Notable players have defined, in part, the Cardinals' success and history. Stan Musial owns the most career batting records with 22. Rogers Hornsby owns the most single-season records with 11. Bob Gibson owns the most career pitching records with 18. Silver King owns the most single-season pitching records with nine.

Red Ames

Leon Kessling "Red" Ames (August 2, 1882 – October 8, 1936) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals, and Philadelphia Phillies.

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