Bill Carrigan

William Francis Carrigan (October 22, 1883 – July 8, 1969), nicknamed "Rough", was a Major League baseball catcher and manager. He played for the Boston Red Sox between 1906 and 1916, and he was a player-manager for the last four of those seasons. In 1915 and 1916, Carrigan's teams won back-to-back World Series, he was the only Red Sox manager to accomplish that feat in franchise history. He was said to exert a positive influence on young Red Sox star Babe Ruth, serving as his roommate and his manager.

After his playing career, Carrigan was a partner in a large chain of New England vaudeville and movie theaters. He returned to the Red Sox as a manager between 1927 and 1929; the team finished in last place in each of those seasons. He then returned to his native Lewiston, where he was named a bank president in 1953 and where he died in 1969.

Bill Carrigan
Bill Carrigan Baseball Card
Catcher / Manager
Born: October 22, 1883
Lewiston, Maine
Died: July 8, 1969 (aged 85)
Lewiston, Maine
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 7, 1906, for the Boston Americans
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1916, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.257
Home runs6
Runs batted in235
Games managed1,003
Managerial record489–500
Winning %.494
Teams
As Player

As Manager

Career highlights and awards

Early life

Carrigan was born in Lewiston, Maine.[1] Carrigan's brother John was a talented pitcher, and Carrigan served as his catcher. Carrigan played football and baseball at Lewiston High School; he also played roller polo, but it caused him to get into fights, and his brother pleaded with him to stop playing.[2] He studied at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.[3] At the time, Holy Cross was known for sending its baseball players to the major leagues.[4]

Early baseball career

Cy Young etc 1912
L to R: Cy Young, Jake Stahl, Carrigan and Michael T. McGreevy during spring training in 1912

Carrigan started his career as a platoon catcher and played all ten seasons with the Boston Red Sox. Biographer Richard A. Johnson noted that Carrigan was known in baseball for combining toughness with intelligence. For a portion of his time in Boston, Carrigan's roommate was Babe Ruth. "Carrigan served Ruth as a combination father confessor, drill sergeant, psychologist and Dutch uncle," wrote Johnson.[4] Ruth called Carrigan the best manager he ever played for. Carrigan also had a close relationship with Detroit Tigers star Ty Cobb. Both Carrigan and Cobb were known for their intense play on the field, but they were friends and Cobb often came to Maine to visit Carrigan.[4]

A schism was forming along religious lines among Red Sox players and coaches in the early 1910s. Players like Tris Speaker held anti-Catholic sentiments, and they supported their manager, Stahl. Carrigan was among a group of Catholics on the team who were more aligned with team co-owner Jimmy McAleer. Midway through the 1913 season, McAleer fired Stahl and made Carrigan a player-manager.[5] Author Thomas Whalen writes that Speaker and Carrigan once had a fistfight, and Carrigan won the fight, helping him to establish a sense of authority.[6]

The Red Sox finished in second place in 1914. In July of that year, they paid $25,000 to Baltimore of the International League for Babe Ruth, Ernie Shore and Ben Egan. Ruth gave up 21 hits in 23 innings pitched for the Red Sox that year.[7]

Hubert Dutch Leonard & Bill Carrigan
Hubert "Dutch" Leonard and Bill Carrigan (right), 1916

Carrigan received a dispensation from the Catholic Church to marry a Protestant woman, Beulah Bartlett, before the 1915 baseball season. They had been friends since childhood.[8] Carrigan led the team to world championships in 1915 and 1916, compiling an 8–2 record as a manager in World Series play. Until Terry Francona duplicated the feat in 2007, he was the only manager to have won two World Series titles with Boston.

In August 1916, Carrigan approached Red Sox owner Joseph Lannin about the possibility of retiring soon. His father-in-law's death had left some family business outstanding.[9] The next month he decided that he would step down at the end of the season, wanting to decrease the time he spent traveling. He was also looking to devote more attention to a movie theater partnership known as the Maine and New Hampshire Theater Corporation.[10] Lannin had hoped that Carrigan would change his mind, but other things were on Carrigan's mind. He and his wife had a child, also named Beulah, in November,[11] and they later had another daughter, Constance, and a son, William Jr.[12]

Hiatus from baseball

With Carrigan having turned down Lannin's pleas to remain manager of the Red Sox, and with Lannin having sold the team, new owner Harry Frazee named Jack Barry as Carrigan's successor in January 1917.[13] Carrigan pursued his theater venture. The group owned as many as fifty theaters and there were three other partners in the corporation: a Lewiston man named William P. Gray; a former Mayor of Portsmouth, Albert Hyslop; and former New Hampshire Governor John H. Bartlett. In January 1922, Carrigan sold his interests in the corporation to Gray; the Washington Times said that Carrigan was thought to have received between $200,000 and $250,000.[14]

Return to the Red Sox

In the years after Carrigan's unexpected departure from the Red Sox, he was often the subject of rumors about a return to baseball. In the article announcing the sale of his theater shares, the Washington Times even speculated that he might be preparing to buy the Red Sox from Frazee.[14] Carrigan did return to the Red Sox, but it was as a manager and not until 1927. He was unable to duplicate his previous success, as Boston finished in last place for three straight seasons.[4]

By early December 1929, Carrigan said he was uncertain whether he would accept President Bob Quinn's offer to return as Red Sox manager. Despite the team's struggles, James O'Leary of The Boston Globe wrote that "Pres Quinn and every baseball fan in New England and throughout the entire American League circuit would like to see the veteran back on the job next season."[15] Carrigan resigned on December 20.[16]

Billy Carrigan (July 1965 - Winthrop Maine)
Carrigan at his summer home on Annabessacook Lake, Winthrop, Maine, July 1965

Later life

In 1953, Carrigan was named president of People's Savings Bank in Lewiston.[17] In 1958, Carrigan's wife died.[12] Carrigan died at Central Maine General Hospital in Lewiston at the age of 85.[17] He was posthumously elected to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2004.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sketches of 13 Who Played Here in '12." Boston Record American, April 21, 1962, p. 11.
  2. ^ "'Rough' local baseball legend". Lewiston Sun Journal. June 24, 2008.
  3. ^ Sawyer, Ford. "'Retired Lewiston banker is lured back to Boston by love of baseball." Boston Globe, December 5, 1926, p. C11.
  4. ^ a b c d Reardon, Michael (2005). "From Fitton Field to The Big Show | Holy Cross Magazine". www.holycross.edu.
  5. ^ Nowlin, Bill; Levin, Lan; Desrochers, Dan; Bouchard, Maurice (2012). Opening Fenway Park with Style: The 1912 Champion Red Sox. SABR, Inc. p. 185. ISBN 9781933599366.
  6. ^ O'Rourke, John (April 8, 2011). "When the Red Sox Ruled". BU Today.
  7. ^ Russell, Richard M. (2014). A Brief History of the Boston Red Sox. p. 24. ISBN 9781257855643.
  8. ^ "Bill Carrigan married again". The Boston Globe. January 6, 1915.
  9. ^ "Barry, Wagner or Donovan may succeed Bill Carrigan as manager". The Boston Post. September 13, 1916.
  10. ^ Whalen, Thomas J. (2011). When the Red Sox Ruled: Baseball's First Dynasty, 1912-1918. Government Institutes. p. 138. ISBN 9781566639026.
  11. ^ "Bill Carrigan's baby photographed for Post". The Boston Post. November 26, 1916.
  12. ^ a b Nowlin, Bill; Levin, Lan; Desrochers, Dan; Bouchard, Maurice (2012). Opening Fenway Park with Style: The 1912 Champion Red Sox. SABR, Inc. p. 68. ISBN 9781933599366.
  13. ^ "Barry named Red Sox pilot; terms secret". Chicago Tribune. January 6, 1917.
  14. ^ a b "'Bill' Carrigan likely successor to Frazee as Boston club owner". Washington Times. January 19, 1922.
  15. ^ O'Leary, James C. (December 7, 1929). "Carrigan undecided". The Boston Globe.
  16. ^ "1929 sports review". The Minneapolis Star. January 11, 1930.
  17. ^ a b "Bill Carrigan, 85, dead; piloted Sox champions". The Boston Globe. July 9, 1969.

External links

1909 Boston Red Sox season

The 1909 Boston Red Sox season was the ninth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 63 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1911 Boston Red Sox season

The 1911 Boston Red Sox season was the eleventh season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the final season that the team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds, before moving to Fenway Park.

1913 Boston Red Sox season

The 1913 Boston Red Sox season was the thirteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 71 losses.

1914 Boston Red Sox season

The 1914 Boston Red Sox season was the fourteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 62 losses.

1915 Boston Red Sox season

The 1915 Boston Red Sox season was the fifteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies in the 1915 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's third World Series.

1916 Boston Red Sox season

The 1916 Boston Red Sox season was the sixteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 63 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Brooklyn Robins in the 1916 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's second consecutive and fourth overall World Series.

1916 World Series

In the 1916 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Brooklyn Robins four games to one. It was the first World Series meeting between the teams.

Casey Stengel shone on offense for the Robins in the 1916 Series, but the Red Sox pitching corps ultimately proved too much for the denizens of Flatbush. The Sox's Babe Ruth pitched thirteen shutout innings in Game 2, starting a consecutive scoreless innings streak that would reach 29 in 1918. As with the 1915 Series, the Red Sox played their home games at the larger Braves Field, and it paid off as they drew a then-record 43,620 people for the final game.

Brooklyn fielded some strong teams under their manager and namesake Wilbert Robinson in the late 1910s. The Robins, also interchangeably called the Dodgers, would win the pennant again in 1920, but the American League teams were generally stronger during that interval. It would be 39 years before the Dodgers would win their first World Series title in 1955.

The two franchises met again in the postseason for the first time in 102 years in the 2018 World Series, 60 years after the Dodgers relocated to Los Angeles. The record for most innings played in a World Series game, set by Game 2 in 1916, at 14, was broken by Game 3 in 2018, at 18. Just like their first matchup in the World Series, the Red Sox would eventually go on to defeat the Dodgers in five games to win their ninth World Series championship.

1927 Boston Red Sox season

The 1927 Boston Red Sox season was the 27th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 51 wins and 103 losses.

1927 Major League Baseball season

The 1927 Major League Baseball season began in April 1927 and ended with the World Series in October. No no-hitters were thrown during the season.

The New York Yankees, whose lineup featured Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, dominated the American League with 110 wins. The Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series.

1928 Boston Red Sox season

The 1928 Boston Red Sox season was the 28th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 57 wins and 96 losses.

1928 Major League Baseball season

The 1928 Major League Baseball season.

1929 Boston Red Sox season

The 1929 Boston Red Sox season was the 29th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 58 wins and 96 losses.

1929 Major League Baseball season

The 1929 Major League Baseball season.

2007 World Series

The 2007 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2007 season. The 103rd edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion Colorado Rockies and the American League (AL) champion Boston Red Sox; the Red Sox swept the Rockies in four games. It was the Rockies' first appearance in a World Series. The Red Sox's victory was their second World Series championship in four seasons and their seventh overall; it also marked the third sweep in four years by the AL champions. The series began on Wednesday, October 24 and ended on Sunday, October 28.

Terry Francona became the second Red Sox manager to win two World Series titles, following Bill Carrigan, who won the 1915 and 1916 World Series. Including the last three games of the AL Championship Series, the Red Sox outscored their opposition 59–15 over their final seven games. Francona also became the first manager to win his first 8 World Series games. The Rockies, meanwhile, became the first NL team to get swept in a World Series after sweeping the League Championship Series, and just the second team ever to suffer such a fate, following the Oakland Athletics in 1990. This fate would again be suffered by the 2012 Detroit Tigers, being swept by the San Francisco Giants in the World Series after sweeping the New York Yankees in the ALCS.

Heinie Wagner

Charles Francis "Heinie" Wagner (September 23, 1880 – March 20, 1943) was an American baseball player and manager. He played shortstop for the New York Giants (1902) and the Boston Red Sox (1906–1918). He was also the manager of the Red Sox during the 1930 baseball season.

Wagner was born in Harlem, New York, in September 1880. He began his baseball career playing for the Waverly Club in the New York State League in 1901. In 1902, he began the season playing for Columbus in the American Association, and played briefly in 17 games for the New York Giants of the National League. He spent the remainder of the 1902 season with the Newark Sailors and continued to play for the Eastern League team through 1906.

In 1906, Wagner joined the Boston Red Sox. He played for the Red Sox from 1906 to 1918, missing only the 1914 and 1917 seasons. He was the captain of Boston's 1912 World Series championship team. He also played for the Red Sox World Series championship teams in 1915, 1916 and 1918. Wagner and Harry Hooper were the only players to play on all four of the Red Sox World Series championship teams of the era.Wagner was considered to be a valuable infielder while playing with the Red Sox and was reputed to have "an exceptionally powerful and accurate throw." He was also known to block the basepaths with his "exceptionally big" feet. With 141 career stolen bases for the Red Sox, Wagner ranked third in team history when he retired (trailing Hall of Famers Harry Hooper and Tris Speaker) and still ranks fifth on the all-time Red Sox stolen base list.After being released by the Red Sox in January 1916, Wagner served as the player-manager of the Hartford team in the Eastern League for the first part of the 1916 season. He returned to the Red Sox in late June 1916.

In 1920, Wagner closed out his playing career as the player-manager of the Norfolk Mary Janes in the Virginia League.After seven years out of baseball, Wagner was hired as a coach for the Boston Red Sox under Bill Carrigan. He was reported to be Carrigan's "right-hand man" during the 1928, 1929, and 1930 seasons. In 1930, he was hired as manager of the Red Sox after Carrigan retired. In Wagner's sole season as manager, the Red Sox finished last in the American League with a 52–102 (.338) record. On September 29, 1930, Wagner's resignation as manager of the Red Sox was accepted by team president Bob Quinn. He never managed again.

After retiring from baseball, Wagner worked as the superintendent of a lumber yard in New Rochelle, New York. He also coached the baseball teams of the New Rochelle Police and Fire Departments and Elks Club.Wagner was married to Martha Hahn Wagner. They had two sons and four daughters. In March 1943, Wagner died of a heart ailment at his home on Van Guilder Avenue in New Rochelle at age 62.

Jake Stahl

Garland "Jake" Stahl (April 13, 1879 – September 18, 1922) was an American first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball with the Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators, and New York Highlanders. A graduate of the University of Illinois, he was a member of the Kappa Kappa chapter of Sigma Chi. He started off as a catcher before being traded to the Senators, where he moved to first base full-time, with occasional stints in the outfield. He was regarded as a good fielder and an average hitter, although he did lead all hitters in the American League in home runs with 10 in 1910. He also struck out 128 times that year, a record that would stand until 1938.

As a player-manager, he led the Senators to two seventh-place finishes, and in his second managerial stint led the Red Sox to the 1912 World Series title. His success was short-lived, as he had a falling-out with his teammates and resigned midway through the 1913 season. His successor, Bill Carrigan, would win two more World Series titles for the Sox. Stahl died of tuberculosis in Monrovia, California at age 43.Stahl has a measure of immortality as the acknowledged eponym of the term "jaking it", a baseball phrase for faking an injury to stay out of the lineup, or otherwise loafing.Stahl was not related to Red Sox teammate Chick Stahl, despite contemporary accounts erroneously listing them as brothers.

Joe Kerrigan

Joseph Thomas Kerrigan (born November 30, 1954 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former relief pitcher, manager and longtime pitching coach in Major League Baseball.

List of Boston Red Sox managers

The Boston Red Sox are a professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). There have been 47 different managers in their franchise history; four during the era of the Boston Americans (1901–1907) and the rest under the Boston Red Sox (1908–present). In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. Since 1912, the Red Sox have played their home games at Fenway Park.Jimmy Collins was the first manager of the Americans and managed from 1901 to 1906. Joe Cronin managed the most games with 1,987 and wins with 1,071 with the Red Sox. Terry Francona, a recent manager of the Red Sox, managed the most playoff games with 42 and wins with 28. Bill Carrigan and Francona have each won two World Series championships. Carrigan won his two championships in 1915 and 1916, while Francona won his two championships in 2004 and 2007. John McNamara and Jimy Williams are the only two Red Sox managers to win the AL Manager of the Year Award, in 1986 and 1999 respectively. On October 22, 2017 the Red Sox named Alex Cora their manager after firing John Farrell on October 11, 2017.

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