Bight (geography)

In geography, a bight is a bend or curve in a coastline, river, or other geographical feature.[1] It typically indicates a large, open bay, often only slightly receding.[2] It is distinguished from a sound by being shallower. Traditionally, explorers defined a bight as a bay that could be sailed out of on a single tack in a square-rigged sailing vessel, regardless of the direction of the wind (typically meaning the apex of the bight is less than 25 degrees from the edges).

The term is derived from Old English byht (“bend, angle, corner; bay, bight”) and is not etymologically related to "bite" (Old English bītan).

Great Australian Bight Marine Park
A stretch of coastline of the Great Australian Bight

Notable bights

References

  1. ^ "Definition of bight in English". Oxford Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 9 August 2016.
  2. ^ "What is a bight?". National Ocean Service. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 9 August 2016.
Bight

bight may refer to:

Bight (geography), recess of a coast, bay, or other curved feature

Bight (knot), a curved section, slack part, or loop in rope (used in the terminology of knot-tying)

German Bight

The German Bight (German: Deutsche Bucht; Danish: tyske bugt; Dutch: Duitse bocht; West Frisian: Dútske bocht; North Frisian: Schiisk Bocht; sometimes also the German Bay) is the southeastern bight of the North Sea bounded by the Netherlands and Germany to the south, and Denmark and Germany to the east (the Jutland peninsula). To the north and west it is limited by the Dogger Bank. The Bight contains the Frisian and Danish Islands. The Wadden Sea is approximately ten to twelve kilometres wide at the location of the German Bight. The Frisian islands and the nearby coastal areas are collectively known as Frisia. The southern portion of the bight is also known as the Heligoland Bight. Between 1949 and 1956 the BBC Sea Area Forecast (Shipping Forecast) used "Heligoland" as the designation for the area now referred to as German Bight.

Outline of oceanography

The following outline is provided as an overview of and introduction to Oceanography.

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