Big Eight Conference

The Big Eight Conference was a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored football. It was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA)[2] by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri,[2] University of Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis. Additionally, the University of Iowa was an original member of the MVIAA, while maintaining joint membership in the Western Conference (now the Big Ten Conference).

The conference was dissolved in 1996. Its membership at its dissolution consisted of the University of Nebraska, Iowa State University, the University of Colorado at Boulder, the University of Kansas, Kansas State University, the University of Missouri, the University of Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State University. The Big Eight kept its headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri.

In February 1994, the Big Eight and the Southwest Conference announced that the two leagues had reached an agreement to form a new conference.[3] The eight members of the Big Eight joined with SWC schools Texas, Texas A&M, Baylor, and Texas Tech to form the Big 12 Conference the following year. A vote was conducted on whether to keep the new conference's headquarters in Kansas City, and by a vote of 7–5 the conference members voted to move to Irving, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. The two Oklahoma schools, all four Texas schools, and Colorado voted for the move while both Kansas schools, Nebraska, Missouri, and Iowa State voted for Kansas City.[4]

Big Eight Conference
Big Eight Conference logo
Established1907
Dissolved1996
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision I
Members8 (final), 12 (total)
Sports fielded
  • 21[1]
    • men's: 11
    • women's: 10
RegionMidwestern United States, Mountain States, West South Central States
Former namesMissouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1907–1964)
Big Six Conference (1928–1948, unofficial)
Big Seven Conference (1948–1957, unofficial)
Big Eight Conference (1957–1964, unofficial)
HeadquartersKansas City, Missouri
CommissionerCarl C. James (final) 1980–1996
Websitehttp://bigeightsports.com
Locations
Big Eight Conference locations

History

Formation

The conference was founded as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) at a meeting on January 12, 1907, by five charter members: the University of Kansas, the University of Missouri, the University of Nebraska, Washington University in St. Louis. The University of Iowa who was also a member of the Western Conference (now the Big Ten Conference) was also a joint member of the conference. Iowa only participated in football and outdoor men's track and field.[5]

Early membership changes

In 1908, Drake University and Iowa Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) joined the MVIAA, increasing the conferences membership to seven. Iowa who was a joint member departed in 1911 to only compete in the Western Conference, but Kansas State University joined the conference in 1913. Nebraska left in 1918 to play as an independent for two seasons before returning in 1920. In 1919, the University of Oklahoma and Saint Louis University applied for membership, but were disapproved due to deficient management of their athletic programs.[6] The conference then added Grinnell College in 1919, with the University of Oklahoma applying again and being approved in 1920. Oklahoma A&M University (now Oklahoma State University) joined in 1925, bringing conference membership to ten, an all-time high.[7]

Conference split

At a meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska, on May 19, 1928, the conference split up. Six of the seven state schools (all except Oklahoma A&M) formed a conference that was initially known as the Big Six Conference.[2] Just before the start of fall practice, the six schools announced they would retain the MVIAA name for formal purposes. However, fans and media continued to call it the Big Six. The three private schools – Drake, Grinnell, and Washington University – joined with Oklahoma A&M to form the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC).[8] The old MVIAA's administrative staff transferred to the MVC.

The similarity of the two conferences' official names, as well as the competing claims of the two conferences, led to considerable debate over which conference was the original and which was the spin-off, though the MVIAA went on to become the more prestigious of the two. For the remainder of the Big Eight's run, both conferences claimed 1907 as their founding date, as well as the same history through 1927. To this day, it has never been definitively established which conference was the original.

Big Eight cities
Locations of final Big Eight Conference full member institutions, 1957–1995

Conference membership grew with the addition of the University of Colorado on December 1, 1947, from the Mountain States Conference.[9] Later that month, Reaves E. Peters was hired as "Commissioner of Officials and Assistant Secretary" and set up the first conference offices in Kansas City, Missouri. With the addition of Colorado, the conference's unofficial name became the Big Seven Conference, coincidentally, the former unofficial name of the MSC.

The final membership change happened ten years later, when Oklahoma A&M joined (or rejoined, depending on the source) the conference on June 1, 1957,[10] and the conference became known as the Big Eight. That same year, Peters' title was changed to "Executive Secretary" of the conference. He retired in June 1963 and was replaced by Wayne Duke, whose title was later changed to "Commissioner".

In 1964, the conference legally assumed the name "Big Eight Conference". In 1968 the conference began a long association with the Orange Bowl, sending its champion annually to play in the prestigious bowl game in Miami, Florida.

Formation of the Big 12 Conference

In the early 1990s, most of the colleges in Division I-A (now known as the Football Bowl Subdivision) were members of the College Football Association; this included members of the Big Eight and Southwest Conferences. Following a Supreme Court decision in 1984, the primary function of the CFA was to negotiate television broadcast rights for its member conferences and independent colleges. In February 1994, the Southeastern Conference announced that they, like the Big Ten, Pac-10, and Notre Dame before them, would be leaving the CFA and negotiate independently for a television deal that covered SEC schools only. This led The Dallas Morning News to proclaim that "the College Football Association as a television entity is dead".[11] More significantly, this change in television contracts ultimately would lead to significant realignment of college conferences, with the biggest change being the dissolution of the Big Eight and the Southwest Conferences and the formation of the Big 12.

After the SEC's abandonment of the CFA, the Southwest Conference and the Big Eight Conference saw potential financial benefits from an alliance to negotiate television deals, and quickly began negotiations to that end, with ABC and ESPN. Though there were complications over the next several weeks (some of which are detailed below), on February 25, 1994, it was announced that a new conference would be formed from the members of the Big Eight and four of the Texas member colleges of the Southwest Conference.[12][13][14] Though the name would not be made official for several months, newspaper accounts immediately dubbed the new entity the "Big 12".[15] Charter members of the Big 12 included the members of the Big Eight plus Baylor, Texas, Texas A&M and Texas Tech.

Dissolution

Following the formation of the Big 12 Conference in 1994, the Big Eight continued operations till August 30, 1996, when the conference was formally dissolved and its members officially began competition in the Big 12 Conference. Although the Big 12 was essentially the Big Eight plus the four Texas schools, the Big 12 regards itself as a separate conference and does not claim the Big Eight's history as its own.

Members

Final members

Institution Location
(population)
Founded Type Enrollment Endowment Nickname Mascot Varsity sports National titles(See chart below)
University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado
(83,312)
1876 Public 30,128 $665,000,000[16] Buffaloes Ralphie the Buffalo / Chip 14 28
Iowa State University Ames, Iowa
(47,198)
1858 Public 28,682[17] $452,200,000[18] Cyclones Cy the Cardinal 16 18
University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas
(65,608)
1865 Public 30,004[19] $1,005,000,000[16] Jayhawks Big Jay / Baby Jay 16 13
Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas
(37,712)
1863 Public 23,588[20] $277,600,000[16] Wildcats Willie the Wildcat 14 0
University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri
(69,101)
1839 Public 33,318[21] $974,900,000[16] Tigers Truman the Tiger 18 2
University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska
(191,972)
1869 Public 24,100[22] $1,140,000,000[16] Cornhuskers Herbie Husker / Lil' Red 21 23
University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma
(80,071)
1890 Public 29,721 $968,400,000[16] Sooners Sooner Schooner / Boomer and Sooner 19 27
Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma
(36,676)
1890 Public 23,307 $311,000,000[23] Cowboys Pistol Pete / Bullet 16 55

Previous members

Institution Location
(population)
Founded Type Enrollment Endowment Nickname Varsity sports NCAA titles[24]
Drake University Des Moines, Iowa
(193,187)
1881 Private 3,164 $135,000,000[16] Bulldogs 18 3
Grinnell College Grinnell, Iowa
(8,902)
1846 Private 1,688 $1,260,000,000[25] Pioneers 18 0
University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa
(59,735)
1847 Public 30,825 $791,231,000[16] Hawkeyes 24 25
Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri
(396,685)
1853 Private 13,995 $4,600,000,000[26] Bears[27] 17 19 (Div. III)

Membership timeline

Full members Other Conference

Subsequent conference affiliations

Team Left for Current home
Colorado Big 12 Conference Pac-12 Conference1
Drake Missouri Valley Conference Pioneer Football League
Missouri Valley Conference2
Grinnell Missouri Valley Conference Midwest Conference3
Iowa Big Ten Conference
Iowa State Big 12 Conference
Kansas
Kansas State
Missouri Big 12 Conference Southeastern Conference4
Nebraska Big 12 Conference Big Ten Conference5
Oklahoma Big 12 Conference
Oklahoma State
Washington-St. Louis Missouri Valley Conference University Athletic Association6
  1. ^ Colorado left the Big 12 for the Pac-12 beginning with the 2011–12 season.
  2. ^ Drake withdrew from the Missouri Valley Conference from 1951–1956. The MVC stopped sponsoring football in 1985; Drake remains a member for all non-football sports. The football program dropped to Division III in 1987, playing as an independent until a change in NCAA rules forced the program to play in Division I. When the new rule took effect in 1993, Drake joined the newly formed Pioneer League, a football-only league playing at the FCS level that prohibits the awarding of football scholarships.
  3. ^ Grinnell joined the Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference beginning with the 1939–40 season; their affiliation from 1928–1939 is unclear.[28] The MCAC merged with the Midwest Athletic Conference for Women to form the Midwest Conference beginning with the 1994–95 season.
  4. ^ Missouri left the Big 12 for the SEC beginning with the 2012–13 season.
  5. ^ Nebraska left the Big 12 for the Big Ten beginning with the 2011–12 season.
  6. ^ Washington-St. Louis left the MVC in 1946; it joined the College Athletic Conference from 1962 through 1971, and became a charter member of the University Athletic Association, which began play with the 1986–87 season. It was independent in all other years.[29]

Commissioners

Conference champions

Men's basketball

Following are the MVIAA/Big Eight regular-season conference champions from 1908 to 1996 (showing shared championships in italics):[1][35]

Men's basketball regular-season championships (1908–1996)
School Total titles Outright titles Years
Colorado 5 3 1954 · 1955 · 1962 · 1963 · 1969
Drake 0 0
Grinnell 0 0
Iowa State 4 2 1935 · 1941 · 1944 · 1945
Kansas 43 32 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1914 · 1915 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 ·
1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 ·
1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1946 · 1950 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1957 ·
1960 · 1966 · 1967 · 1971 · 1974 · 1975 · 1978 · 1986 · 1991 · 1992 ·
1993 · 1995 · 1996
Kansas State 17 14 1917 · 1919 · 1948 · 1950 · 1951 · 1956 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 ·
1963 · 1964 · 1968 · 1970 · 1972 · 1973 · 1977
Missouri 15 12 1918 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1930 · 1939 · 1940 · 1976 · 1980 · 1981 ·
1982 · 1983 · 1987 · 1990 · 1994
Nebraska 7 2 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1916 · 1937 · 1949 · 1950
Oklahoma 13 8 1928 · 1929 · 1939 · 1940 · 1942 · 1944 · 1947 · 1949 · 1979 · 1984 ·
1985 · 1988 · 1989
Oklahoma State 2 1 1965 · 1991
Washington (St. Louis) 0 0

Football

Shared championships are shown in italics:[1][36]

Football conference championships (1907–1995)
School Total titles Outright titles Years
Colorado 5 3 1961 · 1976 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991
Drake 0 0
Grinnell 0 0
Iowa 1 0 1907
Iowa State 2 0 1911 · 1912
Kansas 5 2 1908 · 1930 · 1946 · 1947 · 1968
Kansas State 1 1 1934
Missouri 12 10 1909 · 1913 · 1919 · 1924 · 1925 · 1927 · 1939 · 1941 · 1942 · 1945 ·
1960 · 1969
Nebraska 41 31 1907 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1921 ·
1922 · 1923 · 1928 · 1929 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 ·
1940 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1975 ·
1978 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1988 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 ·
1995
Oklahoma 34 26 1920 · 1933 · 1938 · 1943 · 1944 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 ·
1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1962
1967 · 1968 · 1972 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 ·
1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987
Oklahoma State 2 1 1926 · 1976
Washington (St. Louis) 0 0

Kansas would have won the 1960 title, but after found to be using an ineligible player they were forced to forfeit their victories over Missouri and Colorado, which meant that Missouri was awarded the 1960 Big Eight title.
Oklahoma initially won the 1972 title, but after it was found that they used ineligible players, they were penalized by the NCAA, though they did not force OU to forfeit games. The Big Eight asked them to forfeit three games and awarded the title to Nebraska, but Oklahoma still claims these wins and this title.

National championships won by MVIAA/Big Eight members

The following is a complete list of the 100 AIAW, NCAA and college football championships won by teams that were representing the Big Eight Conference in NCAA- or AIAW-recognized sports at the time of the championship.[24]

Football (11):
1950 – Oklahoma
1955 – Oklahoma
1956 – Oklahoma
1970 – Nebraska
1971 – Nebraska
1974 – Oklahoma
1975 – Oklahoma
1985 – Oklahoma
1990 – Colorado
1994 – Nebraska
1995 – Nebraska

Baseball (4):
1951 – Oklahoma
1954 – Missouri
1959 – Oklahoma State
1994 – Oklahoma

Men's basketball (2):
1952 – Kansas
1988 – Kansas

Men's Cross Country (3):
1953 – Kansas
1989 – Iowa State
1994 – Iowa State

Women's Cross Country (5):
1975 – Iowa State
1976 – Iowa State
1977 – Iowa State
1978 – Iowa State
1981 – Iowa State

Men's golf (9):
1963 – Oklahoma State
1976 – Oklahoma State
1978 – Oklahoma State
1980 – Oklahoma State
1983 – Oklahoma State
1987 – Oklahoma State
1989 – Oklahoma
1991 – Oklahoma State
1995 – Oklahoma State

Men's gymnastics (14):
1971 – Iowa State
1973 – Iowa State
1974 – Iowa State
1977 – Oklahoma
1978 – Oklahoma
1979 – Nebraska
1980 – Nebraska
1981 – Nebraska
1982 – Nebraska
1983 – Nebraska
1988 – Nebraska
1990 – Nebraska
1991 – Oklahoma
1994 – Nebraska

Men's/Women's Skiing (14):
1959 – Colorado
1960 – Colorado
1972 – Colorado
1973 – Colorado
1974 – Colorado
1975 – Colorado
1976 – Colorado
1977 – Colorado
1978 – Colorado
1979 – Colorado
1982 – Colorado (men's)
1982 – Colorado (women's)
1991 – Colorado
1995 – Colorado

Men's Indoor Track (4):
1965 – Missouri
1966 – Kansas
1969 – Kansas
1970 – Kansas

Women's Indoor Track (3):
1982 – Nebraska
1983 – Nebraska
1984 – Nebraska

Men's Outdoor Track (3):
1959 – Kansas
1960 – Kansas
1970 – Kansas

Women's volleyball (1):
1995 – Nebraska

Wrestling (27):
1928 – Oklahoma State
1933 – Iowa State
1936 – Oklahoma
1951 – Oklahoma
1952 – Oklahoma
1957 – Oklahoma
1958 – Oklahoma State
1959 – Oklahoma State
1960 – Oklahoma
1961 – Oklahoma State
1962 – Oklahoma State
1963 – Oklahoma
1964 – Oklahoma State
1965 – Iowa State
1966 – Oklahoma State
1968 – Oklahoma State
1969 – Iowa State
1970 – Iowa State
1971 – Oklahoma State
1972 – Iowa State
1973 – Iowa State
1974 – Oklahoma
1977 – Iowa State
1987 – Iowa State
1989 – Oklahoma State
1990 – Oklahoma State
1994 – Oklahoma State

National team titles by institution

The national championships listed below are for the final eight members of the conference, as of July 2014. Football, Helms, and equestrian titles are included in the total, but excluded from the column listing NCAA and AIAW titles.

Big Eight National Championships
School Total titles Titles as a member
of the Big Eight
NCAA and AIAW titles[24] Notes
Colorado 28 15 27 CU has 1 recognized football title and 1 AIAW title
Iowa State 18 18 18 ISU has 5 AIAW titles
Kansas 13 11 11 KU has 2 Helms basketball titles
Kansas State 0 0 0
Missouri 2 2 2
Nebraska 23 16 18 NU has 5 recognized football titles and 1 AIAW title
Oklahoma 27 19 20 OU has 7 recognized football titles
Oklahoma State 57 21 52 OSU has 4 equestrian titles and 1 recognized football title

Racial integration

The history of the Big Eight Conference straddles the era of racial segregation in the United States, particularly as it relates to African Americans.

Before the formation of the conference, three African-American brothers at the University of Kansas are the first known to have participated in organized sports for a league school: Sherman Haney played baseball for KU beginning in 1888, followed by Grant Haney and then Ed Haney, the last of whom also played football at KU in 1893.[37] At the same time, the University of Nebraska football team had on its roster George Flippin, the son of a slave, beginning in 1891.[37] Nebraska's football team featured three more African-American players over the next 12 years. Notable among these NU players was Clinton Ross, who in 1911 apparently became the first African-American to participate in sport in the MVIAA, following the league's formation in 1907.[38]

Race relations in the United States, however, deteriorated in the early 20th century, and African-American athletes disappeared almost entirely from the conference in the four decades after Ross's final season at NU in 1913. The lone exception during the following decades was Iowa State. In 1923 Jack Trice became the first African-American athlete at Iowa State – and the only one in the conference. Tragically, Trice died two days after playing his second football game with Iowa State, due to injuries suffered during the game (against Minnesota). Jack Trice Stadium at Iowa State is now named in his honor. Trice was followed at Iowa State by Holloway Smith, who played football for ISU in 1926 and 1927. After Smith, the league's teams were all-white for more than two decades. (During this time all of the major professional sports leagues in the U.S. were also segregated.)

Modern era

The modern era of full integration of league sports began at Kansas State, with Harold Robinson. In 1949, Harold Robinson played football for Kansas State with an athletic scholarship. In doing so, Robinson broke the modern "color barrier" in conference athletics, and also became the first ever African-American athlete on scholarship in the conference.[39][40] Harold Robinson later received a letter of congratulations from Jackie Robinson, who had reintegrated major league baseball in 1947 while playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers.[39]

In the spring of 1951 the conference's baseball color barrier was broken by Kansas State's Earl Woods, and in the winter of 1951–1952 Kansas State's Gene Wilson and Kansas's LaVannes C. Squires jointly broke the conference color barrier in basketball.

Nebraska was the third league school to (re)integrate its athletic teams, with Charles Bryant joining the football team in 1952.[41] Iowa State would be next, with Harold Potts and Henry Philmon reintegrating the Cyclone football team in 1953.[42] The following season, Franklin Clarke became the first varsity African-American football player at the University of Colorado. In 1955, Homer Floyd became the first African-American to play football for the KU Jayhawks since Ed Haney in 1893. Sports teams at the remaining three conference schools (Oklahoma, Missouri and Oklahoma State) were subsequently all integrated by the end of the 1950s. Most notably, Prentice Gautt became the first black player for Bud Wilkinson at Oklahoma in 1956.

Conference facilities

This is a listing of the conference facilities as of the last year of the conference 1995–1996.

School Football stadium Capacity Basketball arena Capacity Baseball Stadium Capacity
Colorado Folsom Field 51,655 Coors Events Center 11,065 Prentup Field (Concluded in 1980) N/A
Iowa State Jack Trice Stadium 43,000 Hilton Coliseum 14,356 Cap Timm Field (Concluded in 2001) 3,500
Kansas Memorial Stadium 50,250 Allen Fieldhouse 16,300 Hoglund Ballpark 2,500
Kansas State KSU Stadium 43,000 Bramlage Coliseum 13,500 Frank Myers Field 2,000
Missouri Faurot Field 62,023 Hearnes Center 13,611 Simmons Field 2,000
Nebraska Memorial Stadium 76,500 Bob Devaney Center 13,000 Buck Beltzer Stadium 1,500
Oklahoma Owen Field 74,897 Lloyd Noble Center 11,528 L. Dale Mitchell Baseball Park 2,700
Oklahoma State Lewis Field 56,790 Gallagher-Iba Arena 6,381 Allie P. Reynolds Stadium 3,821

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "BigEightSports.com". Retrieved August 13, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c Murphy, Austin (November 28, 2011). "Bordering On Hatred: Rivalry Week will once again deliver must-see matchups, but this year's Kansas-Missouri showdown is like no other: It may very well be the last". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2011-11-25.
  3. ^ "Texas Giants Merge With Big 8". The Nevada Daily Mail, via Google News. Associated Press. February 27, 1994.
  4. ^ "Big 12 Conference offices to be located in Dallas". The Fort Scott Tribune. Fort Scott, Kansas. Associated Press. February 3, 1996.
  5. ^ "Iowa". www.bigeightsports.com.
  6. ^ "Oklahoma Refused". Lawrence Journal-World. Lawrence, Kansas. May 31, 1919.
  7. ^ "Oklahoma Aggies in Valley Group". Lawrence Journal-World. December 6, 1924.
  8. ^ "Big Six Grid Squads Take Field Tomorrow". The Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. September 16, 1928.
  9. ^ Fullerton, Jr., Hugh (May 27, 1947). "Sports Roundup". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Associated Press.
  10. ^ a b "Group To Ask NCAA Opinion". St. Petersburg Times. Associated Press. May 19, 1957.
  11. ^ Maisel, Ivan (February 12, 1994). "SEC Officially Leaves CFA; Big East Will Follow Soon". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved August 25, 2012.
  12. ^ "Politics played big part information of Big 12". The Deseret News. February 28, 1994. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  13. ^ "Texas Giants Merge With Big 8". The Nevada Daily Mail. Associated Press. February 27, 1994.
  14. ^ "Presidents Decide on Name: Big 12". Lawrence Journal-World. Associated Press. May 13, 1994.
  15. ^ "Politics played big part in formation of Big 12". February 28, 1994. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-07-01. Retrieved 2011-01-29.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  17. ^ "Iowa State University fall enrollment soars to a record 28,682 students". Iowa State University. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2011.
  18. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-12-14. Retrieved 2010-02-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  19. ^ KU Fall 2009 Enrollment Archived 2011-07-19 at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ "Kansas State University Fact Book 2010" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-03-21. Retrieved 2011-08-15.
  21. ^ "New Semester Sets Records". Archived from the original on 20 September 2011. Retrieved 22 August 2011.
  22. ^ "NU enrollment highest in 13 years; up for 5th consecutive year". nebraska.edu. Archived from the original on 20 July 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2011.
  23. ^ http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/oklahoma-state-3170
  24. ^ a b c "Summary ALL DIVISIONS/COLLEGIATE TOTAL CHAMPIONSHIPS" (PDF). Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  25. ^ Brainard, Jeffrey (27 January 2011). "Endowments Regain Ground With 12% Returns" – via The Chronicle of Higher Education.
  26. ^ "Trustees meet, dedicate Brauer Hall – The Source – Washington University in St. Louis". 1 October 2010.
  27. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-23. Retrieved 2011-09-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  28. ^ http://www.grinnell.edu/files/downloads/Grinnell%20College%20Football%20Season-by-Season%20Records_0.pdf
  29. ^ "About Bear Sports".
  30. ^ "Reaves Peters, Ex-Big 8 Head, Dies of Cancer". Kansas City, Missouri: Lawrence Journal-World. January 31, 1966. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  31. ^ "Big Ten Official Athletic Site". www.bigten.org. Archived from the original on 2011-04-07. Retrieved 2011-09-23.
  32. ^ "Neinas Sports Services". www.neinassports.com. Archived from the original on 2011-09-24. Retrieved 2011-09-23.
  33. ^ "Carl James".
  34. ^ "Former Big Eight Commissioner Carl James Passes Away Saturday".
  35. ^ "Big Eight Conference basketball history" (PDF). Big 12 Conference. Retrieved August 13, 2013.
  36. ^ "Big Eight Conference football record book" (PDF). Big 12 Conference. Retrieved August 13, 2013.
  37. ^ a b "Lapchick: Pioneering student-athletes required courage". ESPN.com. 20 February 2008.
  38. ^ "Nebraska U". unlhistory.unl.edu.
  39. ^ a b "Athlete Who Broke Big 12 Race Barrier Dies". CBS College Sports. May 13, 2006. Retrieved 2010-03-17.
  40. ^ Baker, S Zebulon, "'To help foster athletic equality here in the Midwest': Defeating Jim Crow in the Big Seven Conference." Kansas History 39:2 (2016): 74-93. http://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/2016summer_baker.pdf
  41. ^ "Ken Geddes – No. 89 – Nebraska's Greatest Athletes". dataomaha.com.
  42. ^ "Iowa State Athletics". www.cyclones.com.

External links

1960 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1960 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1960 college football season. The team compiled an 11–0 record (7–0 against Big 8 opponents), won the Big 8 championship, defeated Navy in the 1961 Orange Bowl, was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 295 to 93. Dan Devine was the head coach for the third of 13 seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The 1960 season included one of the most famous games in the history of Missouri vs. Kansas rivalry. Kansas used an ineligible player, Bert Coan, in the game, and the win was officially awarded to Missouri, bringing its record to 11–0 instead of 10–1.

The team's statistical leaders included Mel West with 650 rushing yards and 650 yards of total offense, Ron Taylor with 302 passing yards, Danny LaRose with 151 receiving yards, and Donnie Smith with 78 point scored.

1961 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1961 Colorado Buffaloes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Colorado during the 1961 college football season. Head coach Sonny Grandelius led the team to a 7–0 mark in the "Big 8" and 9–2 overall.

1962 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1962 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1962 NCAA University Division football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were coached by head coach Bud Wilkinson.

1963 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1963 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1963 college football season. In their sixth season under head coach Jack Mitchell, the Jayhawks compiled a 5–5 record (3–4 against conference opponents), tied for fourth in the Big Eight Conference, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 207 to 122. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Gale Sayers with 917 rushing yards and 155 receiving yards and Steve Renko with 505 passing yards. Ken Coleman and Pete Quatrochi were the team captains.

1963 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1963 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big Eight Conference in the 1963 college football season. The team was coached by Bob Devaney and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1964 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1964 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big Eight Conference in the 1964 college football season. The team was coached by Bob Devaney and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1965 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1965 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1965 college football season. In their eighth season under head coach Jack Mitchell, the Jayhawks compiled a 2–8 record (2–5 against conference opponents), tied for sixth in the Big Eight Conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 215 to 119. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Dan Miller with 356 rushing yards, Sims Stokes with 271 receiving yards and Bill Fenton with 500 passing yards. Greg Roth and Mike Shinn were the team captains.

1967 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1967 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1967 NCAA University Division football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were coached by head coach Chuck Fairbanks. The Sooners defeated Tennessee, 26–24, to win the Orange Bowl in Miami.

1968 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1968 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1968 college football season. In their second season under head coach Pepper Rodgers, the Jayhawks compiled a 9–2 record (6–1 against conference opponents), tied with Oklahoma for the Big Eight Conference championship, lost to Penn State in the 1969 Orange Bowl, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 394 to 190. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Bobby Douglass with 1,316 passing yards, John Riggins with 866 rushing yards and George McGowan with 592 receiving yards. John Zook was the team captain.Quarterback Bobby Douglass finished 7th in Heisman Trophy voting receiving 9 1st place votes.

1968 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1968 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1968 NCAA University Division football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were coached by head coach Chuck Fairbanks.

1969 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1969 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1969 college football season. The team compiled a 9–2 record (6–1 against Big 8 opponents), finished in a tie for the Big 8 championship, lost to Penn State in the 1970 Orange Bowl, was ranked No. 6 in the final AP Poll, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 365 to 191. Dan Devine was the head coach for the 12th of 13 seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's statistical leaders included Joe Moore with 1,312 rushing yards, Terry McMillan with 1,963 passing yards and 2,157 yards of total offense, Mel Gray with 705 receiving yards, and Henry Brown with 71 points scored.

1970 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1970 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1970 NCAA University Division football season. In their fourth and final season under head coach Pepper Rodgers, the Jayhawks compiled a 5–6 record (2–5 against conference opponents), tied for sixth place in the Big Eight Conference, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 277 to 270. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Dan Heck with 1,169 passing yards, John Riggins with 1,131 rushing yards and Ron Jessie with 308 receiving yards. Larry Brown was the team captain.

1976 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1976 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado Boulder in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. In their third season under head coach Bill Mallory, the Buffaloes compiled an 8–4 record (5–2 against Big 8 opponents), finished in a three-way tie for the Big 8 championship, and outscored their opponents, 305 to 225. The team played its home games on campus at Folsom Field in Boulder, Colorado.

On New Year's Night, Colorado played in the Orange Bowl for the first time in fifteen years, but were defeated 27–10 by the Ohio State Buckeyes of the Big Ten Conference.

1976 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team

The 1976 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team represented Oklahoma State University during the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. Running back Terry Miller had 1714 rushing yards on 291 attempts, averaging 5.9 yards per attempt, and 23 touchdowns. Miller finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy voting.

1991 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1991 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado at Boulder in the 1991 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by 10th year head coach Bill McCartney, played their home games in Folsom Field in Boulder, Colorado, and were members of the Big Eight Conference. They finished with a record of 8–3–1 (6–0–1 Big 8) to finish as co-conference champions, and they lost to Alabama 30–25 in the 1991 Blockbuster Bowl. In the final AP Poll and Coaches' Poll, Colorado was ranked #20 in both polls.

Big Eight Conference (IHSAA)

The Big Eight Conference is an athletic conference currently comprising six IHSAA Class AAA high schools located in Southwestern Indiana with one IHSA Class 2A/3A member in Southern Illinois. The conference members are small city-based schools located in Daviess, Dubois, Gibson, Knox, Posey, and Warrick counties in Indiana and Wabash County in Illinois.

Big Eight Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big Eight Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year was an annual basketball award given to the Big Eight Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1956–57 season and concluded after the 1995–96 season (the Big Eight disbanded and was re-formed into the present day Big 12 Conference). From 1960 through 1967 no award was given out. Wayman Tisdale of Oklahoma and Danny Manning of Kansas are the only players to have received the award three times. Manning was also the consensus National Player of the Year in 1988. Six other players won the award twice, last performed by Bryant Reeves of Oklahoma State (1993/95).

Missouri claimed the most winners with eight, followed by Kansas, Kansas State and Oklahoma with seven apiece.

Big Eight Conference Men's Basketball Tournament

The Big Eight Conference was an NCAA athletic conference that existed from 1907 to 1996, when it and the Southwest Conference disbanded to create the Big 12 Conference. The post-season conference tournament was instituted in 1977 and from that time the winner won the conference's automatic NCAA Tournament bid. From 1977 until 1985, the quarterfinals were played on the campus sites of the higher seeded teams. The last Big Eight men's basketball tournament ran through the conference's final season in 1996. Missouri won the most Big Eight tournament titles with six. Colorado was the only conference member not to win at least one tournament title during its existence.

List of Oklahoma Sooners football seasons

The Oklahoma Sooners college football team competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision, representing the University of Oklahoma in the Big 12 Conference. The Sooners have played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma since 1923.The Sooners claim seven national championships. They have also recorded 46 total conference championships, twelve undefeated, untied seasons and the longest winning streak in Division I FBS history with 47 straight victories. The Oklahoma football program is one of the most successful programs in history, with 598 wins and a winning percentage of .764 since the end of World War II, leading the nation in both stats. Their total of 896 wins ranks sixth all-time in FBS history, and their all-time winning percentage of .704 ranks third among all teams with at least 600 games played.Football was introduced to the university by John A. Harts in 1895. Harts was a student from Kansas who had played the game in his home state. The university had its first paid coach in Vernon L. Parrington, who led the Sooners to a record of nine wins, one loss, and two ties over four seasons. Bennie Owen brought Oklahoma to the national stage during his 22-year tenure as head coach. He retired with a 122–54–16 record, including four seasons in which the team went unbeaten. During Owen's tenure, Oklahoma became a charter member of the Southwest Conference, in which they remained for five years before leaving to join the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The MVIAA conference would later transform into the Big Six, Big Seven, and finally the Big Eight Conference.

In 1947, Oklahoma promoted Bud Wilkinson, then an assistant coach, to head coach. Wilkinson led the Sooners to national championships in 1950, 1955, and 1956, as well as a stretch of 47 consecutive victories that began in 1953 and ended in 1957. Wilkinson's tenure included a streak of 13 consecutive conference championships (in addition to one by his predecessor). Oklahoma continued to perform well after Wilkinson left, but only returned to the national title picture following the hiring of Barry Switzer in 1973. Switzer began similarly to Wilkinson, with eight consecutive conference championships in addition to national championships in 1974 and 1975. Switzer added Oklahoma's sixth national championship in 1985.After a decline that lasted more than a decade, Oklahoma again won the national championship in 2000, after coach Bob Stoops had been hired the previous year. By then Oklahoma had joined a new conference, the Big 12 conference, a combination of the Big Eight Conference and four Texas schools of the Southwest Conference. Since becoming head coach, Stoops has won ten conference championships, while no other team in the Big 12 has more than three. Through the 2017 season, Oklahoma has compiled an overall record of 896 wins, 324 losses, and 53 ties. The Sooners have won 46 conference championships and have appeared in 51 bowl games, most recently in the 2018 Orange Bowl.

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