Bid McPhee

John Alexander "Bid" McPhee (November 1, 1859 – January 3, 1943) was an American 19th-century Major League Baseball second baseman. He played 18 seasons in the majors, from 1882 until 1899, all for the Cincinnati Reds franchise. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000. Known more for his fielding than his hitting, McPhee was the last second baseman to play without a glove.[1]

Bid McPhee
Bid McPhee, Cincinnati Red Stockings, baseball card portrait LCCN2007686981
1888 baseball card of McPhee
Second baseman
Born: November 1, 1859
Massena, New York
Died: January 3, 1943 (aged 83)
San Diego, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 2, 1882, for the Cincinnati Red Stockings
Last MLB appearance
October 15, 1899, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.272
Hits2,258
Home runs53
Runs batted in1,072
Stolen bases568
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction2000
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Early career

Born in Massena, New York, McPhee broke into professional baseball in 1877 as a catcher with the Davenport Brown Stockings of the Northwestern League.[2] He played for Davenport for three seasons, shifting to second base during the 1879 season.[2] After not playing baseball in 1880, he joined an independent team in Akron, Ohio in 1881.[2] Before the 1882 season, he signed a contract to play for the Cincinnati Red Stockings, a team in the newly formed American Association.[3]

Major League Baseball career

Making his major league debut on May 2, 1882, the 22-year-old McPhee had a batting average of just .228, but he led the league in several fielding categories, including putouts and fielding percentage.[3] With McPhee in the lineup for 78 out of their 80 games, the Red Stockings won the inaugural AA championship. McPhee was the only starting second baseman Cincinnati had for the first 18 seasons of its existence, accompanying the team to the National League in 1890, when they became the Cincinnati Reds. In last two seasons of his career, he was the oldest player in the major leagues.[3]

Over 18 years, McPhee batted .271, hit 53 home runs, hit 188 triples, scored 1678 runs, had 1067 runs batted in, and stole 568 bases. He had ten 100-plus seasons in runs scored and regularly led the league in many defensive categories despite playing without a glove for the first 14 years of his career. Without the benefit of the padding provided by fielding gloves, McPhee toughened his hands by soaking them in salt water.

Shortly after retiring as a player in 1899, McPhee rejoined the Reds as a manager. At the team's helm for 1901 and part of 1902, he posted 79 wins and 124 losses for a .389 winning percentage.

Death and honors

McPhee died in 1943. He was cremated and his ashes were interred in the mausoleum at Cypress View Memorial Gardens in San Diego, California.

McPhee was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000, more than 100 years after he played in his last major league game. He is the only Hall of Famer to spend significant time in the American Association. He is one of three Baseball Hall of Famers, along with Johnny Bench and Barry Larkin, who played their entire career in Cincinnati. McPhee is also the only Hall of Famer who played on the 1882 pennant-winning Cincinnati Red Stockings team.

Two years after his induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame, McPhee was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame.

See also

References

  1. ^ Blevins, Dave. The Sports Hall of Fame Encyclopedia: Baseball, Basketball, Football, Hockey, Soccer. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 667. ISBN 978-0-8108-6130-5.
  2. ^ a b c Baseball Biography Project: Bid McPhee
  3. ^ a b c Bid McPhee Statistics and History at Baseball-Reference

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Harry Stovey
American Association Home Run Champion
1886
Succeeded by
Tip O'Neill
Preceded by
Dave Orr
Hitting for the cycle
August 26, 1887
Succeeded by
Harry Stovey
1882 Cincinnati Red Stockings season

The 1882 Cincinnati Red Stockings season was a season in American baseball. It was the first season for the team as a member of the American Association. This team took the nickname from the previous National League team that played from 1876–1879 but otherwise was not related. The Red Stockings (sometimes called the "Reds") won the first AA championship this season.

1883 Cincinnati Red Stockings season

The 1883 Cincinnati Red Stockings season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American Association with a record of 61–37, 5 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1885 Cincinnati Red Stockings season

The 1885 Cincinnati Red Stockings season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American Association, 16 games behind the St. Louis Browns.

1886 Cincinnati Red Stockings season

The 1886 Cincinnati Red Stockings season was a season in American baseball. The Red Stockings finished in fifth place in the American Association, 27.5 games behind the St. Louis Browns.

1887 Cincinnati Red Stockings season

The 1887 Cincinnati Red Stockings season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in second place in the American Association with a record of 81–45, 14 games behind the St. Louis Browns.

1890 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1890 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 77–55, 10½ behind the Brooklyn Bridegrooms. Directly after the season ended, owner Aaron Stern sold the club to Al Johnson.

1891 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1891 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. Shortly before the start of the baseball season, owner Al Johnson sold the club to John T. Brush. The team finished in a tie for last place in the National League with the Pittsburgh Pirates with a record of 56–81, 30.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1892 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1892 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The National League expanded to 12 teams in 1892, and it was announced that the season would be split into two halves, with the winner of each half meeting each other in a "World's Championship Series". The team finished with a combined record of 82–68, fifth-best in the National League, finishing in fourth place in the first half and in eighth place in the second half.

1893 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1893 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished tied for sixth place in the National League with a record of 65–63, 20.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1895 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1895 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds finished in eighth place in the National League with 66 wins and 64 losses, 21 games behind the Baltimore Orioles.

1901 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1901 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in last place in the eight-team National League with a record of 52 wins and 87 losses, 38 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1902 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1902 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 70–70, 33.5 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

2000 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2000 followed the system in use since 1995.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two: Carlton Fisk and Tony Pérez.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected three people from multiple classified ballots:

Sparky Anderson, Bid McPhee, and Turkey Stearnes.

Induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, were held July 23 with George Grande as emcee.

Frank Bancroft

Francis Carter Bancroft (May 9, 1846 – March 30, 1921) was an American manager in Major League Baseball for the Worcester Ruby Legs, Detroit Wolverines, Cleveland Blues, Providence Grays, Indianapolis Hoosiers, and Cincinnati Reds of the National League, as well as the Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association. His greatest success came with the Grays, when he won the 1884 World Series with a record of 84–28 (.750 winning percentage). His stops with teams were short, usually in an interim role, with his last stop being with the Reds after Bid McPhee left the job as manager. Bancroft was 56 years old at the time.

He died in Cincinnati at age 74.

John McPhee (disambiguation)

John McPhee (born 1931) is an American writer.

John McPhee may also refer to:

John McPhee (politician) (1878–1952), Premier of Tasmania

John McPhee (footballer) (1937–2015), Scottish footballer

John McPhee (motorcyclist) (born 1994), British Grand Prix motorcycle racer

John Duncan McPhee (1894–1953), physician and politician in Ontario, Canada

Bid McPhee (John Alexander McPhee, 1859–1943), American baseball player

List of Cincinnati Reds team records

This is a list of team records for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. (The Reds do not recognize records set before 1900.)

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Fred Pfeffer is the all-time leader in errors as a second baseman with 857 career. Pfeffer is the only second basemen to commit over 800 career errors. Bid McPhee (792) and Cub Stricker (701) and the only other second basemen to commit more than 700 career errors.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Bid McPhee is the all-time leader in career putouts as a second baseman with 6,552. Eddie Collins (6,526) and Nellie Fox (6,090) are the only other second basemen with over 6,000 career putouts.

Second baseman

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base in Major League Baseball since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Good second basemen need to have very good range since they have to field balls closer to the first baseman who is often holding runners on, or moving towards the base to cover. On a batted ball to right field, the second baseman goes out towards the ball for the relay. Due to these requirements, second base is sometimes a primarily defensive position in the modern game, but there are hitting stars as well.

BBWAA Vote
Veterans Committee
J. G. Taylor Spink Award
Ford C. Frick Award
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires

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