Bibb Falk

Bibb August Falk (January 27, 1899 – June 8, 1989) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago White Sox (1920–28) and Cleveland Indians (1929–31).

Born in Austin, Texas, Falk played football and baseball at the University of Texas before signing with the White Sox in 1920. He was a spare outfielder with the Sox until news of the 1919 Black Sox scandal broke and eight players were suspended; Falk replaced Shoeless Joe Jackson in left field. Falk was a consistent hitter, ending his career after twelve seasons with a .314 career batting average. He was also known as a heady player whose merciless riding of opponents earned him the nickname "Jockey." His best season was in 1926 with the White Sox; he had a .345 batting average, 43 doubles, and 108 runs batted in, and finished 12th in MVP voting that year.[1] After the 1928 season, he was traded to the Cleveland Indians for Chick Autry, and played three more seasons in the major leagues before retiring as a player and becoming a coach.

After Major League coaching stints with the Indians (1933) and Boston Red Sox (1934), Falk coached baseball at the University of Texas from 1940 to 1942, then again from 1946 to 1967, winning consecutive College World Series titles in 1949 and 1950. In 1975, the new Disch-Falk Field at the University of Texas was named in honor of Falk and his former coach, Billy Disch. He died at age 90 in Austin.[2]

Bibb Falk
Bibb Falk
Left fielder
Born: January 27, 1899
Austin, Texas
Died: June 8, 1989 (aged 90)
Austin, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 17, 1920, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 1931, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Batting average.314
Home runs69
Runs batted in784
Teams
As player

As manager

References

  1. ^ "Bibb Falk Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 30, 2016.
  2. ^ Bibb Falk dies at 90

External links

1924 Chicago White Sox season

The 1924 Chicago White Sox season was a season in major league baseball. Despite the best efforts of player-manager Eddie Collins, the White Sox finished last in the American League for the first time.

1928 Chicago White Sox season

The 1928 Chicago White Sox season was a season in Major League Baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League, 29 games behind the pennant-winning New York Yankees.

1929 Cleveland Indians season

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1949 NCAA Baseball Tournament

The 1949 NCAA Baseball Tournament was the third NCAA-sanctioned baseball tournament that determined a national champion. The tournament was held as the conclusion of the 1949 NCAA baseball season. The College World Series was played at Wichita Municipal Stadium in Wichita, Kansas from June 22 to June 25. The third tournament's champion was the Texas Longhorns, coached by Bibb Falk. The Most Outstanding Player was named for the first time, with the inaugural award going to Tom Hamilton of Texas. This was the first of six championships for the Longhorns through the 2012 season.

1949 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1949 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas in the 1949 NCAA baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Clark Field. The team was coached by Bibb Falk in his 7th season at Texas.

The Longhorns won the College World Series, defeating the Wake Forest Demon Deacons in the championship game.

1950 College World Series

The 1950 College World Series was the fourth NCAA-sanctioned baseball tournament that determined a national champion. The tournament was held as the conclusion of the 1950 NCAA baseball season and was played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska from June 15 to June 23. It was the first College World Series to be held at the stadium, which hosted the event through 2010. The tournament's champion was the Texas Longhorns, coached by Bibb Falk. The Most Outstanding Player was Ray VanCleef of Rutgers. The championship was the second consecutive for the Longhorns.

The tournament consisted of no preliminary round of play, as teams were selected directly into the College World Series. From 1947 to 1949, there likewise was no preliminary round, as the teams were chosen based on committee selections, conference champions, and district playoffs. From 1954 to the present, teams compete in the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament preliminary round(s), to determine the eight teams that play in the College World Series.

1950 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1950 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas in the 1950 NCAA baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Clark Field. The team was coached by Bibb Falk in his 8th season at Texas.

The Longhorns won the College World Series, defeating the Washington State Cougars in the championship game.

1953 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1953 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 1953 NCAA baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Clark Field. The team was coached by Bibb Falk in his 11th season at Texas.

The Longhorns reached the College World Series final, but were eliminated by Michigan.

Billy Disch

William John Disch (October 15, 1872 – February 3, 1953) was an American baseball player and coach. He served as the head baseball coach at the University of Texas at Austin from 1911 to 1939 and as an advisory coach for 12 seasons afterwards. Often called the Connie Mack of college baseball, Disch earned a 513–180–12 record at Texas and garnered 20 Southwest Conference titles. At the time he coached, there were no NCAA postseason playoffs for national honors. Along with Bibb Falk, Disch is one of the two namesakes of UFCU Disch–Falk Field.

He was listed as a scout for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball in 1948.

Blair Cherry

Johnson Blair Cherry (August 7, 1901 – September 10, 1966) was a baseball and football coach for the University of Texas at Austin, and is a member of the Longhorn Hall of Honor and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.

Charles A. Keith

Charles Alexander Keith (February 28, 1883 – June 22, 1960) was an American football, basketball and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Eastern Kentucky University in 1912 after serving as the head baseball coach at the University of Texas in 1910. Keith was a Rhodes Scholar and a member of the faculty at Eastern Kentucky for 41 years.

Cliff Gustafson

Cliff Gustafson is a former Texas high school & college baseball coach who was, for twenty-nine seasons, the head coach of The University of Texas at Austin Longhorn baseball team.

David Pierce (baseball)

David Pierce is an American college baseball coach. He is currently the head coach at The University of Texas at Austin. Pierce was named head coach of the Longhorns on June 29, 2016.

H. R. Schenker

Henry Richard Schenker (April 21, 1882 – May 3, 1922) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Texas at Austin in 1906 and at Mercer University in 1907, compiling a career college football record of 12–4. Schenker was also the head baseball coach at Texas in the spring of 1907, tallying a mark of 16–8.

Schenker was born on April 21, 1882 in Holyoke, Massachusetts. He graduated from Yale University in 1905. He died on May 3, 1922 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Maurice Gordon Clarke

Maurice Gordon Clarke (born May 2, 1877) was an American football and baseball player and coach. The Omaha, Nebraska native served as head football coach at the University of Texas at Austin in 1899, at Western Reserve University—now a part of Case Western Reserve University—in 1900, and at Washington University in St. Louis, compiling a career college football record of 15–8–3. He was also the head baseball coach at Texas in the spring of 1900, tallying a mark of 14–2–1. Clarke was a graduate of the University of Chicago and played quarterback for the Chicago Maroons from 1896 to 1898 teams under Amos Alonzo Stagg. He also lettered in baseball at Chicago.

Texas Longhorns baseball

The Texas Longhorns baseball team represents The University of Texas at Austin in NCAA Division I intercollegiate men's baseball competition. The Longhorns currently compete in the Big 12 Conference.

The University of Texas began varsity intercollegiate competition in baseball in 1894. Texas is the winningest NCAA Division I college baseball program in terms of win percentage, with an all-time win-loss record of 3558–1323–32 (.727). The Longhorns rank second in all-time wins as of June 11, 2018, behind the Fordham Rams. As of the end of the 2018 conference season, Texas has won 78 regular season conference championships and 16 conference tournament championships in baseball.The Longhorns have won six NCAA baseball national championships (1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, and 2005) — second to Southern California's total of 12 — and have been the runner-up in the College World Series (CWS) Championship Games on six other occasions (1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2004, and 2009). Texas holds the records for most appearances in the College World Series (36), most individual CWS games won (85), most overall NCAA Tournament games won (240), and most NCAA Tournament appearances (59); the second-place programs in these categories have 25 CWS appearances (Miami), wins in 74 CWS games (Southern California), 192 overall NCAA Tournament wins (Florida State and Miami), and 56 NCAA Tournament appearances (Florida State), as of June 11, 2018.

Former Longhorns who have gone on to success in Major League Baseball include Roger Clemens, Calvin Schiraldi, Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Spike Owen, Mark Petkovsek, Greg Swindell, Brandon Belt, and Huston Street.

From 1997 to 2016, the Longhorns were led by head coach Augie Garrido, who holds the record for most wins in NCAA baseball history. The team is currently led by third-year head coach David Pierce. Texas plays its home games at UFCU-Disch-Falk Field.

UFCU Disch–Falk Field

UFCU Disch–Falk Field is the baseball stadium of the University of Texas at Austin. It has been home to Texas Longhorns baseball since it opened on February 17, 1975, replacing Clark Field as the home of the Longhorns.

The stadium is named for former Longhorns coaches Billy Disch and Bibb Falk. Beginning August 1, 2006, the name of the stadium was changed to UFCU Disch–Falk Field, following a sponsorship deal with a local credit union, University Federal Credit Union.

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