Betty Ballantine

Elizabeth Jones Ballantine (September 25, 1919 – February 12, 2019), better known as Betty Ballantine, was an American publisher, editor, and writer.[1] She was born during the Raj to a British colonial family. After her marriage to Ian Ballantine in 1939, she moved to New York where they created Bantam Books in 1945 and established Ballantine Books in 1952.[2][3] They became freelance publishers in the 1970s. Their son, Richard, was an author and journalist specializing in cycling topics.

Betty Ballantine
Born
Elizabeth Jones

September 25, 1919
DiedFebruary 12, 2019 (aged 99)
OccupationPublisher, editor, writer
Known forBantam Books
Spouse(s)Ian Ballantine
ChildrenRichard Ballantine

Company

Ian and Betty Ballantine won one special World Fantasy Award for professional work in 1975 and another one shared with Joy Chant and other creators of The High Kings (Bantam, 1983), a reference book on the Matter of Britain that incorporates retellings. (It was also a runner-up in nonfiction Hugo and Locus Award categories.)[4][5] Betty Ballantine received a Special Committee Award from the annual World Science Fiction Convention in 2006 and a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement from the World Fantasy Convention in 2007.[4][6] The Ballantines were both inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2008, with a shared citation.[7]

Publication

Ballantine wrote the novel The Secret Oceans published by Bantam in 1994 (ISBN 0553096605) with illustrations by twelve artists.[8]

References

  1. ^ Italie, Hillel. "Paperback pioneer Betty Ballantine dead at 99". Seattle Times. Retrieved February 13, 2019.
  2. ^ Clute, John; Peter Nichols (1993). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 83–84. ISBN 0-312-09618-6.
  3. ^ ""Paperback Publishers"". Archived from the original on 2012-04-17. Retrieved 2017-06-02.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link). Hyde Park Books; retrieved 2013-04-08.
  4. ^ a b "Ballantine, Betty". The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Archived from the original on 2010-09-01. Retrieved 2010-07-05.
  5. ^ The High Kings title listing at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB); retrieved 2013-04-08. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  6. ^ World Fantasy Convention (2010). "Award Winners and Nominees". Archived from the original on 2010-12-01. Retrieved 2011-02-04.
  7. ^ ""2008 Science Fiction Hall of Fame Ceremony Tickets On Sale May 15"". Archived from the original on 2008-05-10. Retrieved 2008-05-10.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link). Press release April/May 2008. Experience Music Project and Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame; retrieved 2013-03-19.
  8. ^ "Betty Ballantine – Summary Bibliography", ISFDB; retrieved 2013-03-21.

Further reading

External links

2019

2019 (MMXIX)

is the current year, and is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

2019 has been assigned as International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements by the United Nations General Assembly given that it coincides with the 150th anniversary of its creation by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869.

47th World Science Fiction Convention

The 47th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Noreascon 3 (or "... Three", or "... III"), was held August 31–September 4, 1989, at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Hilton Hotel, Boston Park Plaza, and the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.The chairman was Mark L. Olson. The Guests of Honor were Andre Norton, Ian & Betty Ballantine (pro), and The Stranger Club (fan). Seven surviving members of the latter group—the first known science fiction club in the Boston area, and responsible for organizing Boskone I, New England's first science fiction convention, in 1941—attended, including Harry Stubbs (Hal Clement). Total attendance was 6,837, of 7,795 paid memberships.

64th World Science Fiction Convention

The 64th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), styled L.A.con IV, was held in Anaheim, California, United States, from August 23–27, 2006. The venue for the 64th Worldcon was the Anaheim Convention Center and the nearby Hilton and Marriott hotels. The organizing committee was chaired by Christian B. McGuire.

The total registered membership of the convention, based on preliminary post-con data reported by the committee, was 6,832, of which 5,913 physically attended. The members came from 23 different countries. By far the largest contingent was from the United States, followed by Canada, UK, Australia and Japan.

Ballantine (surname)

Ballantine is a surname of Scottish Gaelic, Swiss, South African and Germanic origin. It is first found in Lanarkshire, where the family had been settled since ancient times. The name has also been variously spelled Ballantyne, Bannatyne, Ballanden.

Ballantine Adult Fantasy series

The Ballantine Adult Fantasy series was an imprint of American publisher Ballantine Books. Launched in 1969 (presumably in response to the growing popularity of Tolkien's works), the series reissued a number of works of fantasy literature which were out of print or dispersed in back issues of pulp magazines (or otherwise not easily available in the United States), in cheap paperback form—including works by authors such as James Branch Cabell, Lord Dunsany, Ernest Bramah, Hope Mirrlees, and William Morris. The series lasted until 1974.

Envisioned by the husband-and-wife team of Ian and Betty Ballantine, and edited by Lin Carter, it featured cover art by illustrators such as Gervasio Gallardo, Robert LoGrippo, David McCall Johnston, and Bob Pepper. The agreement signed between the Ballantines and Carter on November 22, 1968 launched the project. In addition to the reprints comprising the bulk of the series, some new fantasy works were published as well as a number of original collections and anthologies put together by Carter, and Imaginary Worlds, his general history of the modern fantasy genre.The series was never considered a money-maker for Ballantine, although the re-issue of several of its titles both before and after the series' demise shows that a number of individual works were considered successful. The Ballantines supported the series as long as they remained the publishers of Ballantine Books, but with their sale of the company to Random House in 1973 support from the top was no longer forthcoming, and in 1974, with the end of the Ballantines' involvement in the company they had founded, the series was terminated.After the termination of the Adult Fantasy series, Ballantine continued to publish fantasy but concentrated primarily on new titles, with the older works it continued to issue being those with proven track records. In 1977, both its fantasy and science fiction lines were relaunched under the Del Rey Books imprint, under the editorship of Lester and Judy-Lynn del Rey. Carter continued his promotion of the fantasy genre in a new line of annual anthologies from DAW Books, The Year's Best Fantasy Stories, also beginning in 1975. Meanwhile, the series' lapsed mission of restoring classic works of fantasy to print had been taken up on a more limited basis by the Newcastle Forgotten Fantasy Library, launched in 1973.

Ballantine Books

Ballantine Books is a major book publisher located in the United States, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine with his wife, Betty Ballantine. It was acquired by Random House in 1973, which in turn was acquired by Bertelsmann in 1998 and remains part of that company today. Ballantine's logo is a pair of mirrored letter Bs back to back. The firm's early editors were Stanley Kauffmann and Bernard Shir-Cliff.

Balrog Award

The Balrog Awards were a set of awards given annually from 1979 to 1985 for the best works and achievements of speculative fiction in the previous year. The awards were named after the balrog, a fictional creature from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. The awards were originally announced by editor Jonathan Bacon in Issue #15 of Fantasy Crossroads and presented at the Fool-Con II convention on April Fool's Day, 1979 at Johnson County Community College, Kansas. The awards were never taken seriously and are often referred to, tongue-in-cheek, as the "coveted Balrog Awards".

Bantam Books

Bantam Books is an American publishing house owned entirely by parent company Random House, a subsidiary of Penguin Random House; it is an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group. It was formed in 1945 by Walter B. Pitkin, Jr., Sidney B. Kramer, and Ian and Betty Ballantine, with funding from Grosset & Dunlap and Curtis Publishing Company. It has since been purchased several times by companies including National General, Carl Lindner's American Financial and, most recently, Bertelsmann; it became part of Random House in 1998, when Bertelsmann purchased it to form Bantam Doubleday Dell. It began as a mass market publisher, mostly of reprints of hardcover books, with some original paperbacks as well. It expanded into both trade paperback and hardcover books, including original works, often reprinted in house as mass-market editions.

Dragonquest

Dragonquest is a science fantasy novel by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey. It is the sequel to Dragonflight, set seven years later and the second book in the Dragonriders of Pern series. Dragonquest was first published by Ballantine Books in May 1971.

I, Libertine

I, Libertine was a literary hoax novel that began as a practical joke by late-night radio raconteur Jean Shepherd.

Ian Ballantine

Ian Keith Ballantine (February 15, 1916 – March 9, 1995) was a pioneering American publisher who founded and published the paperback line of Ballantine Books from 1952 to 1974 with his wife, Betty Ballantine. The Ballantines were both inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2008, with a shared citation.

James Gurney

James Gurney (born June 14, 1958) is an artist and author best known for his illustrated book series Dinotopia, which is presented in the form of a 19th-century explorer’s journal from an island utopia cohabited by humans and dinosaurs. He lives in Rhinebeck, New York, in the Hudson Valley of New York State.

Joy Chant

Joy Chant (born 13 January 1945) is a British fantasy writer. She is best known for the three House of Kendreth novels, published 1970 to 1983. Her legal name is Eileen Joyce Rutter.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2003

Nebula Awards Showcase 2003 is an anthology of science fiction short works edited by Nancy Kress. It was first published in trade paperback by Roc/New American Library in April 2003.

Norwescon

Norwescon is one of the largest regional science fiction and fantasy conventions in the United States. Located in SeaTac in Washington state, Norwescon has been running continuously since 1978.

"Norwescon" was also the name of the 8th World Science Fiction Convention, held in Portland, Oregon, in 1950.

Restoree

Restoree (1967) is a science fiction novel by American writer Anne McCaffrey, her first book published.

It is the story of a young woman who survives being abducted by aliens and finds a new life on another planet.

Betty Ballantine edited Restoree which initiated a long relationship between McCaffrey and Ballantine Books, or later its science fiction imprint Del Rey.

Richard Ballantine

Richard Ballantine (25 July 1940 – 29 May 2013) was a cycling writer, journalist and cycling advocate. Born in America, the son of Ian and Betty Ballantine of Ballantine Books, and educated at the Browning School in New York and Columbia University, he principally resided in London, England. He is most famous for his 1972 Richard's Bicycle Book and its subsequent editions. He was also an editor at Rufus Publications (founded by his parents) and founded several magazines including Bicycle magazine.

World Fantasy Convention

The World Fantasy Convention is an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy. The World Fantasy Awards are presented at the event. Other features include an art show, a dealer's room, and an autograph reception.The convention was conceived and begun by T. E. D. Klein, Kirby McCauley and several others.

World Fantasy Special Award—Professional

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional is given each year to individuals for their professional work in the preceding calendar year in fields related to fantasy that is not covered by other World Fantasy Award categories. These have included editors of magazines and novels, publishers, and authors of non-fiction works. Occasionally, especially in the first few years of the award, some publishing companies were nominated along with individual editors and publishers. The nomination reasons were not specified in the first year of the award, and have sometimes not been specified beyond "contributions to the genre". Individuals are also eligible for the Special Award—Non-professional category for their non-professional work. The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 145 individuals and four publishing companies have been nominated; 53 people have won, including ties and co-nominees. For his work at Donald M. Grant, Publisher Donald M. Grant has won three times out of eight nominations, and six other nominees have won twice. Ian Ballantine and Betty Ballantine have won twice out of two nominations each for their non-fiction and publishing work, and Peter Crowther twice out of four nominations for his work at PS Publishing. Edward L. Ferman won twice out of six nominations for his work at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Stephen Jones twice out of six for his editing and anthology work, and Gordon Van Gelder twice out of seven nominations for his editing work in both books and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Ellen Datlow has received the most nominations with ten, winning once, for her editing and anthology work, and David Pringle has the most nominations without winning with five, for his work at Interzone and for "contributions to the genre".

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